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Making Digital Movies in a Web 2.0 World

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Title: Making Digital Movies in a Web 2.0 World


1
Making Digital Movies in a Web 2.0 World
2
What is Digital Storytelling?
  • Digital Storytelling is the modern expression of
    the ancient art of storytelling. Digital stories
    derive their power by weaving images, music,
    narrative and voice together, thereby giving deep
    dimension and vivid color to characters,
    situations, experiences, and insights.
  • - Digital Storytelling Association
  • http//electronicportfolios.org/digistory/

3
Why Digital Storytelling?
  • In The Classroom
  • Students can demonstrate their grasp of concept
  • Synthesized Brain
  • Creative outlet
  • Students can use a myriad of media, photos,
    images, songs, video, sound to express themselves
    and their stories
  • ELL Instruction
  • Use media to help reach ESL students matching
    vocabulary and imagery
  • It is engaging a format that the YouTube
    generation is accustomed

4
Building the Brand in Corporate America
  • Digital storytelling is more than a technique.
    In fact, it's become something of a movement
    among both artists and business people.
  • One convert is Bill Dauphinais, 53, of
    PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC). He's been using
    it to teach members of the accounting and
    consulting giant about the PwC brand. Dauphinais
    has collected stories about PwC's founders,
    partners, and clients, and he's captured those
    stories on digital video and housed them on a PC.
    Now he travels the world, regaling employees with
    video tales of the firm's core values.
  • "Brands are built around stories," says
    Dauphinais. "And stories of identity -- who we
    are, where we've come from -- are the most
    effective stories of all. This is a powerful way
    to bring them to life.
  • Pink, Daniel Whats Your Story? FastCompany
    From Issue 21 December 1998, 30 December
    2008 http//www.fastcompany.com/magazine/21/rftf.h
    tml

5
Building the Brand in Corporate America
  • COCA-COLA
  • Solicits stories they not only post on the Web,
    but at Coke's digital storytelling exhibit in the
    Atlanta headquarters.
  • Example Indiana housewife Iris Bell's tale of
    her dad's lucky Coke bottle, which traveled with
    him through World War II to Burma, back home to
    America, and survived a house fire. Says Iris
    ''The bottle was daddy's good-luck charm.''
  • Whats Your Story? BUSINESSWEEK ONLINE MAY
    15, 2000 ISSUE http//www.businessweek.com/2000/0
    0_20/b3681104.htm

6
Who else is telling Digital Stories?
Barak Obama inauguration the first digital
president
Barak Obama tops 1 million Facebook supporters I
will recruit new teachers and make new
investments in rural schools, well connect all
of America to 21st century technology and
telecommunications posted 1/9/2009
Source http//www.computerweekly.com/galleries/23
4215-5/Barack-Obama-tops-1-million-Facebook-suppor
ters.htm
7
What media can I use?
  • Videos
  • Images
  • Sounds
  • Songs
  • Speeches
  • Sound Effects

Discovery Education streaming
8
What tools can I use?
  • Digital Editing Software
  • Moviemaker free for PC
  • Photostory 3 free for PC
  • iMovie free for Mac
  • iPhoto free for Mac
  • Adobe Premier Elements not free
  • Final Cut Pro not free

9
What tools can I use?
  • Digital Hardware
  • Digital Camera
  • Digital Video Camera
  • Webcam
  • PC or Mac
  • Mic

10
Seven Elements of Storytelling
  • Point of View In thinking about the point of a
    story, we should also be considering the reason
    for the story. Why this story, now, for this
    group of people?
  • A Dramatic Question In a romance, will the girl
    get the guy? In an adventure, will the hero reach
    the goal? In a crime or murder mystery, who did
    it? When any of these questions are answered, the
    story is over.
  • Emotional Content
  • Did the story engage your emotions? Did it
    make you sad, happy, excited, etc?
  • 4. Adding Your Voice
  • Personalizes your story, helps with ELL
    instruction, scripting, etc
  • The Power of a Soundtrack
  • Soundtracks set the mood of our day, change the
    way we perceive the visual information streaming
    into our eyes, and establish a rhythm for our
    step.
  • Economy If the writer and director do a good job,
    they will shoot just what is necessary to keep
    the story visually rich while moving forward,
    with only the minimum of dialogue and number of
    scenes necessary to allow us to envision the
    larger story.
  • Pacing
  • The rhythm of a story determines much of what
    sustains an audiences interest. A fast-paced
    movie with many quick edits and upbeat music can
    suggest urgency, action, nervousness,
    exasperation, and excitement. Conversely, a slow
    pace will suggest contemplation, romanticism,
    relaxation, or simple pleasures.

Center for Digital Storytelling
http//www.storycenter.org/programs.html
11
Lets look at some examples
  • Point of View In thinking about the point of a
    story, we should also be considering the reason
    for the story. Why this story, now, for this
    group of people?
  • A Dramatic Question In a romance, will the girl
    get the guy? In an adventure, will the hero reach
    the goal? In a crime or murder mystery, who did
    it? When any of these questions are answered, the
    story is over.
  • Emotional Content
  • Did the story engage your emotions? Did it
    make you sad, happy, excited, etc?
  • 4. Adding Your Voice
  • Personalizes your story, helps with ELL
    instruction, scripting, etc
  • The Power of a Soundtrack
  • Soundtracks set the mood of our day, change
    the way we perceive the visual information
    streaming into our eyes, and establish a rhythm
    for our step.
  • Economy If the writer and director do a good
    job, they will shoot just what is necessary to
    keep the story visually rich while moving
    forward, with only the minimum of dialogue and
    number of scenes necessary to allow us to
    envision the larger story.
  • Pacing
  • The rhythm of a story determines much of what
    sustains an audiences interest. A fast-paced
    movie with many quick edits and upbeat music can
    suggest urgency, action, nervousness,
    exasperation, and excitement. Conversely, a slow
    pace will suggest contemplation, romanticism,
    relaxation, or simple pleasures.

12
Lets look at some examples
  • Point of View In thinking about the point of a
    story, we should also be considering the reason
    for the story. Why this story, now, for this
    group of people?
  • A Dramatic Question In a romance, will the girl
    get the guy? In an adventure, will the hero reach
    the goal? In a crime or murder mystery, who did
    it? When any of these questions are answered, the
    story is over.
  • Emotional Content
  • Did the story engage your emotions? Did it
    make you sad, happy, excited, etc?
  • 4. Adding Your Voice
  • Personalizes your story, helps with ELL
    instruction, scripting, etc
  • The Power of a Soundtrack
  • Soundtracks set the mood of our day, change
    the way we perceive the visual information
    streaming into our eyes, and establish a rhythm
    for our step.
  • Economy If the writer and director do a good
    job, they will shoot just what is necessary to
    keep the story visually rich while moving
    forward, with only the minimum of dialogue and
    number of scenes necessary to allow us to
    envision the larger story.
  • Pacing
  • The rhythm of a story determines much of what
    sustains an audiences interest. A fast-paced
    movie with many quick edits and upbeat music can
    suggest urgency, action, nervousness,
    exasperation, and excitement. Conversely, a slow
    pace will suggest contemplation, romanticism,
    relaxation, or simple pleasures.

13
Lets look at some examples
  • Point of View In thinking about the point of a
    story, we should also be considering the reason
    for the story. Why this story, now, for this
    group of people?
  • A Dramatic Question In a romance, will the girl
    get the guy? In an adventure, will the hero reach
    the goal? In a crime or murder mystery, who did
    it? When any of these questions are answered, the
    story is over.
  • Emotional Content
  • Did the story engage your emotions? Did it
    make you sad, happy, excited, etc?
  • 4. Adding Your Voice
  • Personalizes your story, helps with ELL
    instruction, scripting, etc
  • The Power of a Soundtrack
  • Soundtracks set the mood of our day, change
    the way we perceive the visual information
    streaming into our eyes, and establish a rhythm
    for our step.
  • Economy If the writer and director do a good job,
    they will shoot just what is necessary to keep
    the story visually rich while moving forward,
    with only the minimum of dialogue and number of
    scenes necessary to allow us to envision the
    larger story.
  • Pacing
  • The rhythm of a story determines much of what
    sustains an audiences interest. A fast-paced
    movie with many quick edits and upbeat music can
    suggest urgency, action, nervousness,
    exasperation, and excitement. Conversely, a slow
    pace will suggest contemplation, romanticism,
    relaxation, or simple pleasures.

14
Lets look at some examples
  • Point of View In thinking about the point of a
    story, we should also be considering the reason
    for the story. Why this story, now, for this
    group of people?
  • A Dramatic Question In a romance, will the girl
    get the guy? In an adventure, will the hero reach
    the goal? In a crime or murder mystery, who did
    it? When any of these questions are answered, the
    story is over.
  • Emotional Content
  • Did the story engage your emotions? Did it
    make you sad, happy, excited, etc?
  • 4. Adding Your Voice
  • Personalizes your story, helps with ELL
    instruction, scripting, etc
  • The Power of a Soundtrack
  • Soundtracks set the mood of our day, change
    the way we perceive the visual information
    streaming into our eyes, and establish a rhythm
    for our step.
  • Economy If the writer and director do a good
    job, they will shoot just what is necessary to
    keep the story visually rich while moving
    forward, with only the minimum of dialogue and
    number of scenes necessary to allow us to
    envision the larger story.
  • Pacing
  • The rhythm of a story determines much of what
    sustains an audiences interest. A fast-paced
    movie with many quick edits and upbeat music can
    suggest urgency, action, nervousness,
    exasperation, and excitement. Conversely, a slow
    pace will suggest contemplation, romanticism,
    relaxation, or simple pleasures.

15
Finding safe source material
  • http//jdorman.wikispaces.com/digitalstorytelling
  • www.discoveryeducation.com
  • (search 20K images, sounds effects, video
    content k-12)
  • www.archive.org
  • Images.google.com

Finding free source materialthat youll want to
screen first
  • www.flickr.com (creative commons)

16
Finally, well need to put our story into context
  • Storyboarding www.kitzu.org
  • Atomic Learning storyboard pro download for
    free
  • Scripting www.discoveryeducation.com gt
    professional developmentgttrainers toolkit

17
Podcasting
podcast.phila.k12.pa.us
18
Gcast.com
  • http//www.gcast.com/u/dlaufenberg/main

19
More Movie Making with Web 2.0 Tools
  • Animoto.com add images and songs to create a
    music video!
  • Voicethread.com add images and video and
    voice commentary from you or your students
    build a collaborative story!
  • Vuvox.com Cut and paste images and video and
    links to other sites to create an interactive
    video
  • Muveemix.com like animoto but will mix in video
    images and very easy

20
Using your social networks to tell a story!
Jack and Jill went up a hill and when they
reached the top were pleasantly surprised to find
that a party was going on DESPITE the cold
weather! No worries they said. We're
prepared. And they promptly opened their packs of
supplies. Their noses were cold and they
shivered a lot but, they enjoyed the spot, atop,
a lot. During the creation of this story authors
from FL, PA, NJ, and MD contributed
www.twitter.com
21
Other Social Networking Tools
  • Plurk.com
  • Wikispaces.com (free for educators)
  • Blogs (every DEN Star gets one for free)
  • Facebook

22
  • Thank You!
  • Matt_monjan_at_discovery.com
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