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Differences in traffic judgments between young and old adult pedestrians

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Differences in traffic judgments between young and old adult pedestrians Professor: Liu Student: Ruby Motive & Purpose Motive Older pedestrians crashes has a high ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Date added: 7 August 2019
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Title: Differences in traffic judgments between young and old adult pedestrians


1
Differences in traffic judgments between young
and old adult pedestrians
  • Professor Liu
  • Student Ruby

2
Motive Purpose
  • Motive
  • Older pedestrians crashes has a high percentage
    than young pedestrians.
  • Purpose
  • The authors want to know the behavior between
    younger and older pedestrians.

3
Reference
Authors Year Result
Alexander et al. Sheppard and Pattinson 1990 1986 Older pedestrians have a higher risk when they crossing the road than younger pedestrians.
Fildes et al. 1994 Pedestrians accounted for 19 dead and almost have 30 are older people (gt65 years old).
Stelmach and Nahom Trigs et al. 1992 1994 The older peoples perceptual, sensory and cognitive are reduced.
4
Blackspot Accident Analysis
  • Blackspots
  • Road sites which show high crash records.
  • 4 crashes within a midblock section of 1 km, or
    six pedestrian crashes within 1 km in a local
    traffic area within a 3-year period is a
    blackspot area.

5
Method
  • Duration
  • 1987-mid-1995
  • Total accident
  • 52
  • Pedestrian
  • 19 older pedestrians (65 years old)
  • 33 younger pedestrians

6
Road location
  • The older pedestrians are lacking of
    consideration for traffic in the far-side lane.
  • Maybe we can say that higher crash rates in the
    far-side lane because the older pedestrians walk
    slowly.

7
First test
  • Location shopping centers on arterial roads in
    Melbourne.
  • Set up two video cameras to observe the people
    who across the roads.
  • 80 older and 80 younger pedestrians.
  • 10 A.M and 1 P.M. on weekdays.

8
Layout of observational filming
9
Results- Kerb delay
  • Kerb delay
  • The duration in the back of the last car passed a
    waiting pedestrian to the first step forward onto
    the roadway.
  • There was a significant difference between groups
    for kerb delay.

10
Results- Gap acceptance
  • Gap acceptance
  • The distance of a near-side oncoming car from a
    pedestrian at the first step forward to cross the
    road.
  • The younger pedestrians significant shorter gaps
    than older pedestrians.

11
Results- Time-of-arrival of car and pedestrian
crossing times
  • Time-of-arrival of car and pedestrian crossing
    times
  • The closest near-side car were calculated from
    the time when a pedestrian took the first step
    forward to cross at the time when the vehicle
    reached the crossing point.

12
Results- Time-of-arrival of car and pedestrian
crossing times
13
Results- Crossing styles
  • Crossing styles
  • The crossing times and the traffic distribution
    during the road cross fro all pedestrians in each
    groups.
  • Non-interactive who adopted an extra safe.
  • Interactive crossers who adopted a less safe
    strategy.
  • Near-side traffic
  • Far-side traffic
  • Both direction of traffic

14
Results- Crossing styles
15
Discussion
  • The older pedestrians took longer to leave the
    kerb after a car passed their line of crossing.
  • Older people behave in a less safe than younger
    adults when making judgments on gaps in the
    traffic.
  • Many older people may have difficulties judging
    the nearness of a car when stepping off the kerb.

16
Discussion
  • In a complex environment of two-way traffic,
    older people will think two problems, one is the
    directions of traffic and another is making
    decisions.
  • Some older people will cross the far-side
    traffic, in this reason they will get crash very
    often because their walking speed is very slowly.

17
Second test
  • Location shopping centers on arterial roads in
    Melbourne.
  • Set up two video cameras to observe the people
    who across the roads.
  • 40 older and 40 younger pedestrians.
  • In gap acceptance , time-of-arrival and crossing
    time measures were obtained for 33 younger people
    and 31 older people.
  • 10 A.M and 1 P.M. on weekdays.

18
Results
  • Average traffic flow and car speed were
    comparable for the two groups.

19
Results-Kerb delay
  • No significant in these two groups.

20
Result-Gap acceptance
  • No significance here.
  • Probably the experimenter number is too small.

21
Result-Time-of-arrival of vehicle and pedestrian
crossing times
22
Discussion
  • The older pedestrians behaved much more like
    younger and a little different from those in the
    first study.
  • The older people in the first study over
    compensate than younger people.

23
General Discussion
  • When age increases, the ability to cross the road
    becomes more difficult.
  • The older people difficulties in judging the gaps
    in traffic.
  • Older pedestrians are impaired compared to
    younger people because they take in less
    information and are less able to process the
    information to reach a decision.

24
General Discussion
  • The older people hard to change their attention
    because their capacity reduce.
  • Older people are hard to do the actively
    selecting or dividing attention between sources
    of information in order to make the right
    judgments.

25
Conclusions
  • When older people cross the road, they tend to
    adopt when the road have been identified.
  • Gap acceptance and time-of-arrival judgments are
    factors in safe road crossing behaviors on the
    road
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