Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP) PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6dc742-YmY2M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP)

Description:

Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP) Mary Mackrain, M.Ed- Statewide CCEP TA and Training Consultant – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:62
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 47
Provided by: Bear87
Learn more at: http://www.umich.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP)


1
Child Care Expulsion Prevention (CCEP)
Mary Mackrain, M.Ed- Statewide CCEP TA and
Training Consultant
2
Why do we need CCEP?
Overview of the Michigan Initiative
3
A Day in the Life of a Child in Michigan Source
Childrens Defense Fund, The State of Americas
Children Yearbook 2002
  • Every 26 minutesa child is born into poverty
  • Every 21 minutesa child is abused or neglected
  • Every 8 hoursa child dies before their 1st
    birthday
  • Every 3 daysa child or teen is killed by gunfire


4
How Are Our Children Being Affected?
  • One fourth to one third perceived as not
    being ready for school with concerns centering
    around emotional development
  • Preschool children being expelled from
    early childhood settings
  • Some are showing scars stemming from
    serious family problems
  • Others show signs of serious emotional
    difficulties
  • Pediatricians are prescribing psychotropic
    drugs for very young children with behavioral
    problems

5
  • (From the National Center for Children in Poverty
    article by Raver Knitzer)
  • Social and Emotional Competence and School
    Readiness
  • Young children who act in anti-social ways are
    provided with less instruction and less positive
    feedback, they tend to like school less, learn
    less and attend less
  • These children are at greater risk of dropping
    out and engaging in delinquent acts
  • Across studies, the social and emotional
    competence of young children predicts their
    academic performance in 1st grade, OVER and above
    their cognitive skills and family background!

Research Messages
6
(No Transcript)
7
Research Messages
  • (From the National Center for Children in Poverty
    article by Raver Knitzer)
  • Interventions that Work
  • For preschoolers at higher risk, research
    supports the use of interventions that target
    both parents and providers
  • Early findings from one on-site mental health
    consultation national demonstration indicate
    consistent cross-site effects of improved
    parenting and better child outcomes.

8
When surveying caregivers across the country,
what was the number one issue that they
complained about?
Long Hours
CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS!
9
A Look Into the CCEP Initiative
What Exactly is Child Care Expulsion Prevention?
10
A Collaborative Effort Funded by The Department
of Human Services, public assistance, child and
family welfare agency Administered by The
Department of Community Health
11
  • Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Model
  • (Cohen and Kaufman, 2000)
  • The mental health perspective emphasizes
  • Prevention of mental health disorders and
    fostering social and emotional well-being in all
    children
  • Identifying and helping children at risk
  • Recognizing that some children have serious
    challenges requiring more intensive services
  • Viewing parents, teachers and child care staff as
    collaborative partners.

12
(No Transcript)
13
The Cornerstones
  • Programmatic and child/family centered
    consultation
  • Skilled consultants
  • Reflective Consultation
  • Technical Assistance
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Collaboration

14
Our Goal
To support families and child care providers in
successfully nurturing the social and emotional
development of infants, toddlers and young
children (0-5) who are in early care settings.
15
What does it do?
  • An early childhood mental health consultant
    builds a relationship designed to improve the
    ability of parents, staff, programs and systems
    to
  • prevent, identify, treat, and reduce the impact
    of social and emotional problems among children
    in licensed child care settings, from birth to
    age five.

16
Values
The key to quality service throughout the state
17
  • All children deserve safe, stable, caring and
    nurturing environments
  • Children exhibiting challenging behavior are
    trying to communicate
  • Building healthy relationships among children,
    families providers and other early childhood
    professionals is core to building
    emotional/social competence
  • All children deserve to benefit from early
    childhood mental health consultation
  • Families and providers are active partners in all
    service provision

18
  • Services should be strength-based,
    developmentally appropriate and culturally
    competent
  • Consultants should strive to understand and
    respect the uniqueness of the values, beliefs and
    practices of others
  • Consultants should assist others to view
    childrens behavior within the ecological model,
    utilizing a reflective approach

19
CCEP is part of building resilience, not just
managing symptoms.
20
  • How do the projects work?
  • These are pro-active voluntary projects. A
    request for child or programmatic consultation
    may occur from parents or providers. Both the
    parent and the childcare provider/teacher must
    agree to participate in child centered
    consultation.
  • Once a referral is signed, a consultant will
    contact the parent and/or provider to set up a
    time to observe in the preschool/childcare
    setting and the home if applicable.
  • Following the observation, a meeting is then set
    up with the parent and/ or the provider to
    discuss and develop a plan of action.

21
Services Available
  • On site observations
  • Home visits for parents
  • Consultation for childcare providers
  • Parent-Provider conferences
  • Developmental Screening
  • Coordination of services and linkages to
    community resources
  • Training for childcare providers and families
  • Parenting support groups

22
When Should You Refer?
It is much easier to build a child than it is to
repair and adult.
23
  • If infants
  • Do not want to be held
  • Can not be comforted
  • Rarely look at caregivers
  • Are difficult to engage
  • Rarely coos, babbles or smiles

Adapted from the S/E Development Wheel, MIAIMH,
2004
24
  • If Toddlers
  • Are very fearful or irritable
  • Show little preference for parent/caregiver
  • Cant express feelings
  • Are unsmiling or withdrawn
  • Have extreme temper tantrums
  • Lack curiousity or enthusiasm

Adapted from the S/E Development Wheel, MIAIMH,
2004
25
  • If Caregivers.
  • Are concerned about a childs behavior
  • Are experiencing challenges with relationships
  • Are concerned about the emotional environment of
    the care setting
  • Want to strengthen partnerships with parents

26
If You or Someone That You Know..
  • Have unrealistic expectations of children
  • See this role as temporary, not invested
  • Feel a lack of respect for their profession
  • Feel unimportant
  • Are overwhelmed with personal problems
  • Seem depressed
  • Has difficulty with communication skills
  • Has too many demands
  • Just wants Support!

27
What is Happening Now? Currently, there are 12
CCEP projects across the state, serving 27
counties that operate as a collaborative effort
of the Michigan 4C Association and the MI. Dept.
of Community Health through funds from the Family
Independence Agency.
28
Are We Making an Impact?
All results that follow are adapted from the
2003-2004 End of year Quarterly Report
29
Child/Family Consultation
(Adapted from the CCEP end of year 2003-2004
Quarterly Report)
30
Number of Children Served
551Directly
7,646 Indirectly
31
Types of Settings Served
32
Reasons Children Are Referred for Services
33
Strategies Used
34
Ages of Children Served
35
Status of Child Care Placement
36
Consultations provided to child care
settingsYTD 3,401
Consultations provided to parents YTD 2,111
37
Programmatic Consultation
(Adapted from the CCEP end of year 2003-2004
Quarterly Report)
38
Training
118 trainings held 2,563 child care providers
39
Examples of Training Topics
  • Attachment sensitive practice in adoption and
    foster care
  • Working effectively with violent and aggressive
    states
  • Understanding grief and loss in early childhood
  • Adult relationship building
  • Social and emotional development 0-5

40
Examples of Strategies Used
  • Social and emotional programs (DECA)
  • Environmental tools (ITERS)
  • On-going workshops to support the mental health
    of staff
  • Relationship based practice (listening,
    consistency and empathy!)
  • Parent groups

41
Technical Assistance Includes
  • On-site consultation
  • Resource development
  • Training
  • Development and outreach

42
Technical Assistance
18 trainings held 903 professionals 219
consultations to new and existing sites
43
Our Belief
  • Early intervention is the key to helping children
    succeed in school. By enhancing the early care
    and learning experience, young children with
    behavioral difficulties are supported, their
    social emotional competency is enhanced, and
    they are better prepared for school.

44
Helpful ResourcesInformation for this
presentation was a collective adaptation of
material from the following Michigan resources
                    
Social and Emotional Development in Young
Children, A Guide developed by the Michigan
Department of Community Health can be downloaded
at http//www.michigan.gov/documents/Social_Emoti
onal_Development_in_Young_Children_Guide_88553_7.p
df   Social and Emotional Developmental Wheel The
developmental wheel can be ordered for 1.00 plus
shipping and handling by contacting Deborah
Kahraman at Michigan Association for Infant
Mental Health,13101 Allen Road, Southgate, MI
48195 Phone 734-785-7700, ext. 7194, Fax
734-287-1680 dkahraman_at_guidance-center.org
45
Social Emotional Health and School Readiness
What, how, and how much a child learns in school
will depend in large part on the social emotional
competence they have developed as preschoolers
Children who do not begin kindergarten socially
and emotionally competent are often not
successful in the early years of school and can
be plagued by behavioral, emotional, academic
and social development problems that follow them
into adulthood (Peth-Pierce, 2000).
46
For more information about Michigans CCEP
Initiative or to receive TA consultation, please
contactMary Mackrain, M.EdStatewide CCEP TA
Consultant248/594-3250mackrain_at_aol.com
About PowerShow.com