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Topics for Today

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Title: Engagement Learner Centered Teaching Last modified by: Created Date: 7/16/2011 6:14:38 PM Document presentation format: – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Topics for Today


1
Topics for Today
  • Curriculum and its current shifts in the United
    States
  • Effective student instruction to accommodate
    these shifts
  • Teacher evaluation process in our district

2
Definitions
  • CURRICULUM - WHAT is taught
  • INSTRUCTION - HOW it is taught
  • EVALUATION - HOW is teacher

  • effectiveness established

3
Primary Goal
4
21st Century student skills
  • Exhibit curiosity
  • Experiment with new ideas
  • See other points of view
  • Challenge their own beliefs
  • Engage in intellectual discussions
  • Ask provocative questions
  • Generate hypotheses
  • Exhibit respect for other viewpoints
  • Collaboration and teamwork
  • Critical thinking
  • Creative thinking

5
Standards Drive Curriculum
  • English Reading Standards
  • English Writing Standards
  • Math Standards
  • Science
  • Social studies
  • For each grade level K 12
  • Teachers have to teach all standards each year

6
New Common Standards
  • All states have the same standards
  • Go deep instead of broad
  • Content remains almost same
  • Students have to do higher level thinking tasks
    in the new standards
  • Focus on student LEARNING AND MASTERING the
    standard not the teacher just TEACHING it.

7
Curriculum Shifts English
  • 1. Building knowledge through content-rich
    nonfiction
  • 2. Reading, writing and speaking grounded in
    evidence from text, both literary and
    informational
  • 3. Regular practice with complex text and its
    academic language

8
Anchor Standards 1-3
  • Key Ideas and Details 1Read closely to determine
    what the text says explicitly and to make logical
    inferences from it cite specific textual
    evidence when writing or speaking to support
    conclusions drawn from the text.
  • Key Ideas and Details 2 Determine central ideas
    or themes of a text and analyze their
    development summarize the key supporting details
    and ideas.
  • 3. Key Ideas and Details 3 Analyze how and why
    individuals, events and ideas develop and
    interact over the course of a text.

9
Anchor standards 4-6
  • 4. Craft and Structure 4 Interpret words and
    phrases as they are used in a text, including
    determining technical, connotative, and
    figurative meanings, and analyze how specific
    word choices shape meaning or tone.
  • Craft and Structure 5 Analyze the structure of
    texts, including how specific sentences,
    paragraphs, and larger portions of the text
    (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza)
    relate to each other and the whole.
  • Craft and Structure 6 Assess how point of view
    or purpose shapes the content and style of a
    text.

10
Anchor standards 7-10
  • Integration Of Knowledge and Ideas 7 Integrate
    and evaluate content presented in diverse media
    and formats, including visually and
    quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 8 Delineate
    and evaluate the argument and specific claims in
    a text, including the validity of the reasoning
    as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the
    evidence.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 9 Analyze how
    two or more texts address similar themes or
    topics in order to build knowledge or to compare
    the approaches the authors take.
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10
    Read and comprehend complex literary and
    informational texts independently and
    proficiently

11
Math Shifts
  • Shift 1 Focus
  • Shift 2 Coherence
  • Shift 3 Procedural Fluency
  • Shift 4 Deep Conceptual
  • Understanding
  • Shift 5 Applications (Modeling)
  • Shift 6 Balanced Emphasis

12
Three Effective Strategies
  • 1. High Yield Strategies
  • 2. Critical Thinking Skills
  • 3. High Level Tasks

13
Student Engagement
14
Marzano Research
  • Average retention rate after 24 hours
  • Lecture
    5
  • Reading 10
  • Audio-Visual 20
  • Demonstration 30
  • Discussion Groups___________________ ___ __50
  • Practice by doing ______________________
    75
  • Teach others / immediate use of Learning ___
    90

15
1.High Yield Strategies
  • A. Similarities and Differences
  • B. Summarizing Note Taking
  • C. Visual representations
  • D. Advance Questions Organizers

16
A. Similarities and Differences
  • 1. Comparing Contrasting
  • 2. Classifying
  • 3. Creating Metaphors
  • 4. Creating Analogies

17
Comparing Contrasting
18
21st century student skills
  • Exhibit curiosity
  • Experiment with new ideas
  • See other points of view
  • Challenge their own beliefs
  • Engage in intellectual discussions
  • Ask provocative questions
  • Generate hypotheses
  • Exhibit respect for other viewpoints

19
Compare and contrast
20
Classifying
21
Tree map
22
Analogy
23
Bridge map
24
B. Summarizing and Note-taking
  • Summarizing
  • To effectively summarize, students must
  • delete some information,
  • substitute information, and
  • keep some information.
  • To accomplish this task, students must be able to
    analyze at a deep level.

25
Summarizing DEFINITON
  • the main idea of text or an
    experience in as FEW words as possible in new
    manner.

Restating
26
2. Summarizing and Note-taking
  • Note-taking
  • Note-taking requires student to determine what
    information is most important.
  • Verbatim notetaking is ineffective. Students are
    not engaged and not synthesizing.
  • They should be considered a work in progress.
    Adding and revising aids understanding.
  • The more notes the better

27
Cornell Notes
  • 1. Generate an essential question
  • 2. Generate questions individually/collaborati
    vely about
  • the text read or about to be read
  • 3. While conducting reading, take notes and
    respond
  • to the reading
  • 4. SUMMARIZE information at the end

28
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29
Two Part Guided Response
30
Informal Outline
  • Main Ideas Supporting Details
  • 1.
  • a.
  • b.
  • c.
  • 2. a.
  • b.
  • c.

31
2. Critical Thinking Skills
  1. Defining
  2. Describing
  3. Compare Contrast
  4. Classifying
  5. Whole to part
  6. Sequencing
  7. Cause Effect
  8. Analogies

32
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33
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34
C. Activities for Nonlinguistic
Representation
  • Organizers/Thinking Maps
  • Making physical models
  • Generating mental pictures
  • Drawing pictures or pictographs
  • Engaging in kinesthetic activities

35
Questioning
  • Focus on what is important
  • Higher level questions means deeper thinking
  • Giving think time increases depth in student
    answers

36
Ciardiellos Four Types of Questions Ciardiellos Four Types of Questions Ciardiellos Four Types of Questions
Question Type Question Stems Cognitive Operations
Memory Who, what, when, where? Naming, defining, identifying
Convergent Thinking Why, how, in what ways? Explaining, comparing, contrasting
Divergent Thinking Imagine, suppose, predict, if/then, how might? Predicting, hypothesizing, inferring
Evaluative Thinking Defend, justify, judge Valuing, judging, justifying choices
37
What Is When Is Where Is Which Is Who Is Why Is How Is
What Did When Did Where Did Which Did Who Did Why Did How Did
What Can When Can Where Can Which Can Who Can Why Can How Can
What Would When Would Where Would Which Would Who Would Why Would How Would
What Will When Will Where Will Which Will Who Will Why Will How Will
What Might When Might Where Might Which Might Who Might Why Might How Might
38
KWL

39
D. Advance Questions, Cues, and
Organizers

40
Strategies
  • Responding to stories
  • Charts, maps, and pictures
  • Setting up students prior knowledge by telling a
    little story before you begin to teach to help
    them connect to the information

41
3. High level student tasks
  • 1. Application
  • 2. Analysis
  • 3. Evaluation
  • 4. Synthesis

42
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43
Teacher Evaluation

44
1.Engaging and Supporting all Students in
Learning
  • Connecting students prior knowledge, life
    experience and interests with learning goals.
  • Using a variety of instructional strategies and
    resources to respond to students diverse needs
  • Facilitating learning experiences that promote
    autonomy, interaction, and choice.
  • Engaging students in problem solving, critical
    thinking, and other activities that make subject
    matter meaningful.
  • Promoting self-directed, reflective learning for
    all students.

45
2.Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments
for Student Learning
  • Creating a physical environment that engages all
    students.
  • Establishing a climate that promotes fairness and
    respect.
  • Promoting social development and group
    responsibility.
  • Planning and implementing classroom procedures
    and routines that support student learning.
  • Using instructional time effectively.

46
3.Understanding and Organizing Subject Matter
Learning for Student Learning
  • Demonstrating knowledge of subject matter content
    and student development.
  • Organizing curriculum to support student
    understanding of subject matter.
  • Interrelating ideas and information within and
    across subject matter areas.
  • Developing student understanding through
    instructional strategies that are appropriate to
    the subject matter.
  • Using materials, resources, and technologies to
    make subject matter accessible to students.

47
4.Planning Instruction and Designing Experiences
for All Students
  • Drawing on a valuing student backgrounds,
    interest, and developmental learning needs.
  • Establishing and articulating goals for student
    learning.
  • Developing and sequencing instructional
    activities and materials for student learning
  • Designing short-term and long-term plans to
    foster student learning
  • Modifying instructional plans to adjust for
    student needs.

48
5.Assessing Student Learning
  • Establishing and communicating learning goals for
    all students
  • Collecting and using multiple sources of
    information to assess student learning.
  • Involving and guiding all students in assessing
    their
  • own learning
  • Using the results of assessments to guide
    instruction.
  • Communicating with students, families, and other
    audiences about student progress.

49
6. Developing as a Professional Educator
  • Reflecting on teaching practice and planning
    professional development.
  • Establishing professional goals and pursuing
    opportunities to grow professionally.
  • Working with communities to improve professional
    practice.
  • Working with families to improve professional
    practice.
  • Working with colleagues to improve professional
    practice.
  • Balancing professional responsibilities and
    maintaining motivation.

50
Process of Evaluation
  • Goal setting meeting with principal at the
    beginning of the year
  • Teachers choose focus goals from 1-6 goals
  • Teacher and principal devise a plan to make the
    goals happen
  • Principal does two observations in the classroom
    provides written feedback
  • Principal does walk throughs in classroom
    frequently focuses on goals provides feedback

51
Process of Evaluation
  • Principal meets with the teacher at the end of
    the year and evaluates teacher based on focus
    goals AND other standards too
  • Teacher does a self-evaluation in writing
  • Principal also has student achievement data
    conversations all through the year
  • If teacher not performing adequately, teacher is
    put on a plan of improvrment

52
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