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National Center on Physical Activity and Disability

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National Center on Physical Activity and Disability James H. Rimmer, Ph.D., Professor University of Illinois at Chicago Director, National Center on Physical – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: National Center on Physical Activity and Disability


1
National Center on Physical Activity and
Disability
  • James H. Rimmer, Ph.D., Professor
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Director, National Center on Physical
  • Activity and Disability
  • IFC Executive Committee Co-Chair
  • September 13, 2007

2
Presentation Outline
  • Health Disparities in Adults and Youth with
    Disabilities
  • NCPADs
  • Central Mission
  • Resources
  • Future

3
Health Disparities In Adults with Disabilities
4
Without Disabilities
Health Disparities - Adults
With Disabilities
5
Health Disparities - Adults
Risk Factor
Percent
6
Health Disparities In Youth with Disabilities
7
Disparity in physical activity participation
among youth with disabilities
  • Youth with disabilities are 4.5 times more likely
    to be physically inactive compared to
    non-disabled youth.
  • Youth with disabilities are twice as likely as
    non-disabled youth to report watching TV for more
    than 4 hours per day.
  • 26.6 of youth with disabilities report 3 hours
    /school day of sedentary activities vs. 20.4 of
    youth without disabilities.

8
Youth with Disabilities are Vulnerable to
Overweight and Obesity
  • Researchers have reported a higher prevalence of
    overweight among children and adolescents with
  • Spina bifida
  • Prader-Willi syndrome
  • Down syndrome
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Brain Injury
  • Visual impairments
  • Learning Disabilities
  • ADHD and autism spectrum disorders
  • Rimmer et al. Obesity Levels Among Youth with
    Disabilities, J Adoles Health, 2007.

9
Prevalence of Overweight (BMI 95th) among
Youth (ages 617) by Disability and Sex.
Percentage
Source 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition
Examination Survey reported by Bandini et al.
(2005).
10
Overweight and Obese Youth are at Increased Risk
of Serious Health Issues
  • Chronic Conditions
  • High blood pressure
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Insulin resistance
  • Secondary Conditions
  • Mobility limitations
  • Extreme deconditioning
  • Fatigue
  • Pain
  • Depression
  • Social isolation

11
Adolescents with and without disabilities who
exercise lt once per week
Percent Exercising 1 / week
Steele et al., 2004 Data from the Canadian WHO
Cross-National Survey of Health Behaviors in
School-Aged Children (HBSC).
(OR 4.50 95 CI 3.55-5.72)
12
The Challenge Before Us
  • Physical activity is significantly lower and
    obesity significantly higher in youth and adults
    with disabilities.
  • The problem is exacerbated by
  • Children and adults with disabilities have less
    access to physical activity.
  • Technology and convenience items reduce energy
    expenditure in IADL and ADL.
  • Unemployment rate for working age people with
    disabilities is more than three times that for
    non-disabled people.

13
Cycle of Physical Inactivity and Onset of
Secondary Conditions
Development of secondary conditions
Physical inactivity
Onset or increase of functional limitations
Decreased capacity to engage in physical activity
14
NCPADs Three Central Features
  • A resource and information center on physical
    activity and disability, with thousands of
    references on the subject.
  • A health promotion center encouraging and
    supporting healthy lifestyles for people with
    disabilities.
  • A research and training center promoting further
    research on the benefits of physical activity and
    guiding best practice in the field.

15
What We Do
  • Identify, collect, synthesize, and organize
    materials on physical activity and disability.
  • Create useful resources for consumers,
    professionals, and researchers.
  • Increase public awareness of the importance of
    physical activity for people with disabilities.

16
More of What We Do
  • Promote increased participation in physical
    activity by people with disabilities.
  • Educate consumers and professionals about best
    practices and safe methods of exercise.
  • Identify important research issues and stimulate
    further research on physical activity and
    disability.

17
Pathways to Inclusion in Disability and Health
Healthy, Active Lifestyles FOR ALL
Barriers to Physical Activity Make it More
Difficult for People with Disabilities to Reach
the Goal
Empower the Person
Enable the Environment
Improve Physiological and Psychological Health
Promote Adherence
Increase Participation
Provide Access
18
How Do We Get There?
  • Better surveillance systems to track and monitor
    obesity and PA levels in Youth and Adults with
    disabilities
  • Evidence-based practices in physical activity and
    health promotion for youth and adults with
    disabilities
  • Inclusive (livable) communities for youth and
    adults with disabilities

19
How Do We Get There?
  • Health marketing campaigns aimed at increasing
    awareness and knowledge of major health
    disparities
  • Education and Training Programs that increase
    knowledge and awareness
  • Capacity Building (i.e., training students in
    public health, continuing education)

20
NCPAD Today
21
Website Enhancements
22
Interactive Features
23
Directories
  • The following searchable directories are
    available online at www.ncpad.org
  • NCPAD Programs Database http//www.ncpad.org/progr
    ams
  • NCPAD Personal Trainers Database
    http//www.ncpad.org/trainers
  • NCPAD Parks Database http//www.ncpad.org/parks
  • NCPAD Suppliers Database http//www.ncpad.org/supp
    liers

24
Technical Assistance
The NCPAD Contact Us Form
NCPAD Consumer Request Service System Form
25
Partnership with the Presidents Council on
Physical Fitness and Sports (PCPFS)
  • The initial focus of the partnership is on the
    development of a series of fact sheets.
  • Identified topics
  • International Classification of Functioning,
    Disability, and Health
  • Pedometers for people with disabilities
  • Resources to assist in locating accessible
    recreation programs and facilities
  • Including people with disabilities in media
    messaging (via pictures, placards, training
    toolkitsany special considerations for talking
    or working with people who have disabilities)

26
2007 Featured Products
  • A complete list of NCPAD-developed resources is
    available at www.ncpad.org/shop.

27
NCPADs Next Steps Connecting to State Public
Health Departments
28
Supporting State Implementation Projects in
Physical Activity
MT
ND
OR
NY
MI
IA
IL
CA
VA
KS
NC
NCPAD provides information resources and
technical assistance to the 16 State
Implementation Projects in the area of physical
activity for people with disabilities
Validated evidence based practice and effective
health promotion strategies for increasing
physical activity are fed back to NCPAD
AR
SC
NCPAD actively promotes adoption of evidence
based physical activity programs for people with
disabilities to all States
FL
29
Working at the Intersection of Disability and
Health
  • Establish framework for collecting, aggregating
    and synthesizing data from various State
    Disability and Health modules.
  • Build a longitudinal database that qualifies
    the health behaviors (i.e., physical activity,
    nutrition) of people with disabilities.
  • Track benefits of each program longitudinally
    (i.e., post-implementation).

30
Future Directions
  1. Customize (tailor) materials and content for
    specific target audiences.
  2. Establish a National Health Marketing Campaign
    targeted to specific audiences (e.g., public
    health professionals, providers, consumers,
    etc.).
  3. Develop safe, effective and innovative ways for
    online exergaming for people with disabilities.

31
Future Directions
  • Employ new and emerging technologies that
    encourage/motivate people with disabilities to
    live healthier, active lifestyles.
  • Online community of exercisers using sport, dance
    and general exercise.
  • Become an interactive Evidence-Based Center that
    connects ongoing DH projects with each funded
    State and rest of nation.

32
Technology and Innovation Resources
  • Accessible programs
  • Personal trainers
  • Exercise buddies
  • PEP
  • PEP for youth
  • Cooperative or competitive play
  • Full programs on DVD
  • Downloadable clips
  • Demonstrations of sport and recreation activities

User Supported Communities
Video Library
Interactive Online
33
Livable Communities/Universal Design
34
HEZ Toolkit
  • Toolkit to build Health Empowerment Zones (HEZ)
    for People with Disabilities
  • Accessible sidewalks and paths
  • Healthy food choices
  • Accessible recreation and exercise facilities
  • Transportation choices
  • Improving social networks

35
HEZ Toolkit
  • Toolkit content
  • Accessibility and Participation
  • Community Accessibility Survey
  • Facilities
  • AIMFREE (fitness facilities, parks, trails)
  • Grocery Store Assessment Instrument (physical
    availability and freshness/quality)
  • Built Environment
  • Health Empowerment Zone Environmental Assessment
    Tool (pathways, curb cuts)

36
HEZ Toolkit
  • Toolkit content (cont).
  • Health Behavior (exercise and nutrition)
  • PADS
  • B-PADS
  • Fat Fiber Questionnaire
  • Health Outcomes
  • Secondary Conditions Instrument

37
Training Professionals and Paraprofessionals
38
ACSM Distance Learning Initiative
Bridging the Gap
World of Disability
World of Fitness
39
Inclusive Fitness Trainer Certification Program
  • Health professionals gain entry-level knowledge
    specific to physical activity and disability

40
Capacity Building
41
IFC Call to Action
  • Work with the U.S. Surgeon General and the Office
    on Disability
  • Create partnerships to expand accessibility
  • Work with health care providers and organizations
    to increase physical activity for people with
    disabilities
  • Advocate for research and technologies
  • Recognize those who support the cause

42
  • http//www.incfit.org

43
Technology Innovation (PEPONLINE)
  • Tailor to personal needs and environmental
    factors.
  • Eliminate any and all barriers.
  • Make it easy to implement.
  • Keep it fluid - changing as the person changes.
  • Provide some type of feedback mechanism on a
    regular basis (i.e., monthly).
  • Account for seasonal changes (i.e. winter vs.
    summer).

44
PEPonline Coach Summary Screen
45
PEPonline Participant Screen
46
Personalized Attention
  • Friendly, highly trained people available by a
    toll-free telephone, TTY, e-mail, or fax to
    provide personalized responses to your questions.
  • Toll-free phone 1-800-900-8086 (v or tty)
  • E-mail to ncpad_at_uic.edu
  • Fax questions to 1-312-355-4058
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