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Story Literary Elements

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Story Literary Elements Some basics that every good story must have . Every story needs characters People Animals or Creatures * Knowing a Character Ways we can ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Story Literary Elements


1
Story Literary Elements
  • Some basics that every good story must have .

2
Every story needs characters
  • People

Animals
or Creatures
3
Knowing a Character
  • Ways we can learn about particular characters
  • Action what the character does
  • Dialogue what the character says
  • Narration what a narrator conveys
  • Appearance how the character looks
  • Name how the character is named

4
The protagonist is the good guy
5
The antagonist is the bad guy or force
6
Character by Change and Development
  • Static character one who remains the same, or
    very nearly so, throughout a story, unchanging
  • Dynamic character one who changes
  • Flat character a type or one-dimensional or,
    perhaps, a stock character with no depth or
    complexity of personality the faithful
    sidekick the shrewish wife the cruel
    stepmother the bad cop
  • Round character a three-dimensional character,
    sufficiently complex as to be believable as a
    person with all the depth and unpredictability
    that real people have, one having more facets
    than a flat character (Kennedy Gioia 61).

7
The time and place of the story is the setting
8
Theme
  • is a central idea which unifies the whole
    literary work.
  • It is an expression of the works possible
    meaning.
  • A story can have more than one theme.
  • Different readers may find one theme more
    intriguing or more important than another.

9
Plot
  • is a structure of events arising out of a
    conflict in a story (Plot).
  • Rather than simply defining plot as the events in
    a story, i.e., what happens, Kennedy Gioia
    define plot as the artistic arrangement of
    those events (10).
  • When writing about plot, focus on the arrangement
    of events.

10
Freytags Pyramid
  • German playwright Gustav Freytag drew a pyramid
    to illustrate the events of a dramatic plot
    Crisis
  • Complication (Falling (Rising
    action)
    action)
  • Resolution/Dénouement
  • Exposition

11
Stages of a Plot Exposition, Complication,
Crisis, Resolution/Dénouement
  • Exposition the opening portion of a story which
    sets the scene, introduces the main characters,
    tells us what happened before the story opened,
    and provides any other needed background
    information.
  • Complication or conflict any story needs some
    sort of conflict. Here are the major types of
    conflict which can occur person vs.
    person person vs. society person vs.
    nature person vs. self

12
  • Crisis a moment of greatest tension, the high
    point of crisis in a story, when the outcome is
    to be decided.
  • Resolution/Dénouement the outcome or conclusion
    literally, dénouement means the untying of the
    knot, an unraveling, for an explanation or
    tying up of loose ends.
  • Rising and Falling Action
  • The part of a structure before the crisis is
    called Rising Action, while the part after the
    crisis is Falling Action.

13
Exposition
  • A narrative device, often used at the beginning
    of a work, that provides necessary background
    information about the characters and their
    circumstances.
  • what has gone on before (flashback)
  • the relationships between characters
  • the development of a theme
  • the introduction of a conflict

14
A hint about what happened before is called a
flashback
Flashback techniques include memories, dreams,
stories of the past told by characters, or even
authorial sovereignty. (the author might say,
"But back in Tom's youth. . . .") Flashback is
useful for exposition, to fill in the reader
about a character or place, or about the
background to a conflict.
15
A hint about what will happen next is called
foreshadowing
For example, if you hear this
Then you know someones about to get eaten!
16
Great stories have a conflict
Man vs. Man
Man vs. Nature
Man vs. Society
Man vs. Self
Man vs. Machine
17
Types of Conflict
  • Remember types of conflict occurring in a short
    story
  • character vs. character
  • character vs. society
  • character vs. nature
  • character vs. self
  • __________________________________

18
Style, Tone, and Mood
  • Style relates to an authors use of vocabulary,
    level of diction, sentence structure, arrangement
    of ideas. It is a combination of two elements
    the idea to be expressed and the individuality of
    the author (Style 487).
  • Tone shows the authors attitude toward his or
    her subject. A tone might be formal, informal,
    intimate, solemn, sombre, playful, serious,
    ironic, condescending (Tone 503).
  • Mood The climate of  feeling in a literary work.
    The choice of setting, objects, details, images,
    and words all contribute towards creating a
    specific mood. For example, an author may create
    a mood of mystery around a character or setting
    but may treat that character or setting in an
    ironic, serious, or humorous tone

19
Irony
  • Irony is the contrast between what is expected
    or what appears to be and what actually is.
  • Verbal Irony The contrast between what is said
    and what is actually meant.
  • Irony of Situation This refers to a happening
    that is the opposite of what is expected or
    intended.
  • Dramatic Irony This occurs when the audience or
    reader knows more than the characters know.

20
Point of View
  • From what voice or angle of vision or perspective
    a story or other literary work is told.

I was framed! I just wanted to borrow a cup of
sugar!
That rotten wolf tried to eat us!!!!
21
Importance of Point of View
  • POV is one of the most important decisions an
    author makes in creating a story. It is NOT what
    is the an authors theme or opinion. It simply
    identifies whos the narrator and what that
    voices relation is to a story.
  • Who will tell the story?
  • Which characters do we as readers understand
    best?
  • How does the point of view prejudice us for or
    against characters in a story?

22
Point of View Types
  • 1st person the narrator is a character in the
    story and speaks with the
    pronoun I to narrate.
  • 3rd person the narrator is distanced from the
    story and speaks with a more impersonal voice
    using the pronouns she, he, or they

23
Types of 3rd person POV
  • 3rd person omniscient the narrator seems to
    know everything about every character, all their
    thoughts, motivations, and feelings. Frequently
    this narrative voice is assumed to be that of
    the storys author. But authors do not always
    intend for us to make that assumption. Most
    frequently, this narrative voice is simply
    unlocatable and cannot really be clearly
    identified.
  • Omniscient means all knowing (omni all)

24
  • 3rd person limited the narrator knows the
    thoughts, motivations, and feelings of a limited
    number of characters, not of all characters. Most
    commonly, the narrator shows us the storys
    action through the consciousness of only one
    character.

25
Whether youre the reader, or the writer, a great
story includes all these literary elements!!!
irony
foreshadowing
protagonist
plot
conflict
theme
crisis
characters
setting
flashback
antagonist
point of view
style, tone, and mood
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