The Legend of the Cherokee Rose No better symbol of the pain and suffering of the Trail of Tears than the Cherokee Rose. The mothers of the Cherokee grieved so much that the chiefs prayed for a sign to lift the mother - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Legend of the Cherokee Rose No better symbol of the pain and suffering of the Trail of Tears than the Cherokee Rose. The mothers of the Cherokee grieved so much that the chiefs prayed for a sign to lift the mother

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Title: The Legend of the Cherokee Rose No better symbol of the pain and suffering of the Trail of Tears than the Cherokee Rose. The mothers of the Cherokee grieved so much that the chiefs prayed for a sign to lift the mother


1
The Legend of the Cherokee Rose No better symbol
of the pain and suffering of the Trail of Tears
than the Cherokee Rose. The mothers of the
Cherokee grieved so much that the chiefs prayed
for a sign to lift the mothers spirits and give
them strength to care for their children. From
that day forward a beautiful new flower, a rose,
grew wherever a mothers tear fell to the ground.
The rose is white for the mothers tears. It
has a gold center, for the gold taken from the
Cherokee lands, and seven leaves on each stem
that represents the seven Cherokee clans that
made the journey. To this day, the Cherokee Rose
prospers along the route of the Trail of Tears.
2
INDIAN REMOVAL IN THE UNITED STATES
3
As the population grew, the colonists pushed
farther west into the territories occupied by the
American Indians.
4
Inevitably, this movement led to clashes over
land.
5
By the time Andrew Jackson became President in
1829, the native population east of the
Mississippi River had dwindled to 125,000.
6
In contrast, the non-Indians population had risen
to 13 million.
7
Jackson saw Indian Removal as an opportunity to
provide for the needs of the white farmers and
businessmen. He also claimed that removal was
also in the best interest of the Indians. Why?
8
Jackson to the Indians Where you now are, you
and my white children are too near to each other
to live in harmony and peace. Your game is gone,
and many of your people will not work and till
the earth. . . The land beyond the Mississippi
belongs to the President and no one else, and he
will give it to you forever.
9
How did the Five Civilized Tribes try to avoid
removal?
10
1. Adopted farming life style 2. Began to
receive formal education 3. Had own written
language 4. Established their own newspaper
(Cherokee Phoenix)  5.  Adopted white mans
idea of black slavery established plantations
11
How did Georgia begin the removal process of the
Cherokee and the other members of the Five
Civilized tribes within its border?
12
In an agreement with the federal government, the
state of Georgia gave up claims to large tracts
of western land in exchange for the federal
government negotiating treaties for Indian
removal.
13
Throughout the late 1820s, legal conflict over
ownership of Cherokee lands led the issue to the
halls of the U.S. Supreme Court.
How do you think the Supreme Court decided?
Why?
14
The Supreme Court and Chief Justice John Marshall
ruled the Cherokee could keep their lands because
of earlier federal treaties.
15
Furthermore, the court ruled the treaty was an
agreement between two nations and couldnt be
overruled by Georgia.
16
What do you think President Jackson and the
Georgia did next?
17
Georgia ignored the courts ruling. President
Jackson refused to enforce the ruling. He
remarked, Well, John Marshall has made his
decision, now let him enforce it.
18
As part of the Indian Removal Act of 1830,
federal agents misled tribal leaders into signing
removal treaties with the government.
19
In 1838, the Georgia militia was ordered to force
the Cherokee out of Georgia.
20
17,000 Cherokees were brutally rounded up and
marched to Indian territory in Oklahoma.
21
As many as 4,000 died along the Trail of Tears.
22
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23
I fought through the Civil War and have seen men
shot to pieces and slaughtered by the thousands,
but the Cherokee removal was the cruelest work I
ever knew. Georgia Soldier involved in
removal process
24
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25
Alexander, Jobe May 3, 1938 Jesse S.
Bell-Investigator Indian-Pioneer History,
S-149 Interview with Jobe Alexander Proctor,
Oklahoma I am a full blood Cherokee Indian born
in Going-Lake District, Indian Territory,
Cherokee Nation, March 10, 1854, and raised
there. My father, Dun-Ev-Nall Alexander was born
in Georgia and was driven West during the
immigration. All the Indians were gathered up or
rounded up by Federal soldiers and put in pens
and guarded until ready for the move they were
gathered up by the "Clans" and left their gardens
and crops, and some of the old homes of the
Cherokee are still standing in Georgia. The last
group that was rounded up revolted the leader
gave the signal to revolt and all turned on the
guards and took their guns away and murdered the
guards and they made for hide aways in the
mountains. That is why the Indians are back in
North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia. They
never were found or hunted much.
26
Life story of her grandfather, Washington Lee,
Cherokee Indian In 1838, my grandfather,
Washington Lee, came to the Territory and stopped
at Westville. He was driven from his home in
Georgia over the Trail of Tears with all the
other Cherokee Indians and while on the trail
somewhere he lost his father and mother and
sister, and never saw them any more. He did not
know whether they died or got lost. The
Cherokees had to walk all the old people who
were too weak to walk could ride in the
Government wagons that hauled the food and the
blankets which they allowed to have. The food was
most always cornbread or roasted green corn. Some
times the men who had charge of the Indians would
kill a buffalo and would let the Indians cut some
of it and roast it. The food on the Trail of
Tears was very bad and very scarce and the
Indians would go for two of three days without
water, which they would get just when they came
to a creek or river as there were no wells to get
water from. There were no roads to travel over,
as the country was just a wilderness. The men and
women would go ahead of the wagons and cut the
timber out of the way with axes. This trail
started in Georgia and went across Kentucky,
Tennessee and through Missouri into the Territory
and ended at Westville, where old Fort Payne was.
Old Fort Wayne was built to shelter the Indians
until some houses could be built.
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