The teachers I had that really cared sure got my attention. For example, my sixth and eighth grade English teachers were very personable. As a result, I not only worked harder for them, they became my role models. Years later I ended up teaching - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The teachers I had that really cared sure got my attention. For example, my sixth and eighth grade English teachers were very personable. As a result, I not only worked harder for them, they became my role models. Years later I ended up teaching

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Title: The teachers I had that really cared sure got my attention. For example, my sixth and eighth grade English teachers were very personable. As a result, I not only worked harder for them, they became my role models. Years later I ended up teaching


1
The teachers I had that really cared sure got my
attention. For example, my sixth and eighth
grade English teachers were very personable. As
a result, I not only worked harder for them, they
became my role models. Years later I ended up
teaching middle school English. Theres quite a
bit of power in the appropriate role model at the
right time in ones life! Eric Jensen
2
What's Up with the Teenage Brain Inquiring
Minds Want to Know
Julie Ross Siena Heights University
3
Adolescence
  • The period of physical and psychological
    development between childhood and adulthood.
  • Pure turmoil!!

4
Specialization of the Teenage Brain
TV
movies
shopping
Internet
Junk food
Sleep
Cell phone
Time with friends
Social life
30-minute showers
music
school
sports
Family time
5
Caution Massive Reconstruction Ahead
6
Neuronsbrain cells associated with learning
7
Critical parts
  • Hippocampusshort term memory
  • Corpus callosumquicker access
  • Temporal lobeslanguage maturation
  • Cerebellummotor coordination and learning
  • Parietal lobessensory input and spatial
    awareness
  • Amygdala--emotions
  • Frontal lobescritical thinking and
    problem-solving

8
What adolescents can do that younger children
cant (the older the adolescent, the better)
  • Understand sarcasm and irony
  • Hypothesize
  • Think abstractly
  • Comprehend complex math theorems
  • Use analogies, symbolism, metaphors, etc.
  • Consider things logically

Athletes and musicians can also show significant
improvement
9
Teenagers only seem irresponsible and
unreasonable when they are compared to people
older and younger. But viewed against the
backdrop of the profound and rapid neurological
and biological changes that are happening in
their bodies, their behavior is much more
understandable and logical.
10
Why cant adolescents think like adults?
  • Adultsfully developed frontal lobes allow for
    logical reasoning, analysis and deduction (can
    consider beyond the moment)
  • Adolescentsincomplete frontal lobes result in
    adolescent decisions from the amygdalathe
    emotional control center

This is an obvious cause of communication gaps!
The real secret to why adolescent dont act like
adults..
THEY DONT HAVE ADULT BRAINS!!!
11
Predict one common conflict between teens and
their parents or teens and their teachers
12
Common conflicts between teens and parents
  • Friends and dates
  • Curfews
  • Going out
  • Going steady
  • Hairstyles
  • Clothes
  • Where they are going
  • Household chores
  • Spending money responsibly
  • Car
  • Telephone
  • School grades
  • Homework
  • Behavior at school
  • Lack of respect for parents

13
Common conflicts between teens and teachers
  • Unfinished work
  • Bullying
  • Tardiness
  • Truancy
  • Lying
  • Why do I need to know this?
  • Vague directions
  • Verbal threats of class failure
  • Boring lessons
  • Inconsistent limits
  • Rules and consequences
  • Overreactions
  • Failure to listen
  • How many times do I have to tell you?
  • Bad attitude
  • Disrespect for authority

14
Adolescents are trying to cope in a school run
and designed by adults from an adult
perspective---adults with brains that are
structured and function in ways vastly different
from their own.
15
4 main triggers for the brains attention
  • Physical survival or pleasure
  • Use of ones name
  • Choice/control
  • Novelty

16
Teens are particularly susceptible to novelty
  • Is there novelty in the classroom?
  • Where will they get their novelty?

Novelty stimulates dopamine (the feel good
drug) in the brain!
17
Novelty, especially when attached to the thrill
of danger, is very attractive to adolescents
because it produces intense feelings of pleasure
that tempt even cautious and prudent teens to
dangerous experimentation.
18
Think of a lesson you regularly teach
  • Write down 3 different ways you could add novelty
    to that lesson

19
4 main triggers for the brains attention
  • Physical survival or pleasure
  • Use of ones name
  • Choice/control
  • Novelty

Another important trigger for the adolescent
brain..
Emotion
20
Living for emotion
  • Teen emotions can easily cement lifelong memories
    or form powerful learning blocks.
  • Are class lectures and discussions emotionally
    charged? (Remember, emotions also make us
    passionate about succeeding!)
  • Do paper-pencil tests generate emotion (besides
    stress!)?
  • Where will they get their emotion?

21
Teens seem to go out of their way to find thrills
and chills. If you can bring the emotions of
riding a roller coaster into your classroom,
students will find learning very exciting.
22
Why do they do what they do??
23
  • They have adolescent brains
  • They have difficulty anticipating consequences
  • Theyre trying to figure out who they are
  • They dont feel good about themselves
  • They want to feel good so they try risky things
  • They want to be accepted
  • They believe they are indestructible

24
Who Am I??
  • Teens experiment to try to find their own
    identity
  • Teens experiment to attract the others
  • Teens experiment to try to fit in

Who Am I? is also tied to a students
self-concept. Those with a negative self concept
are more at risk of dropping out of school,
becoming pregnant, or using drugs.
25
When students are asked to excel at the same
subjects and demonstrate knowledge in the same
way, is it any wonder that some teens criticize
themselves as never being able to fit in?
26
Risky Business
27
  • Novelty stimulates dopamine in the brain
  • Frontal lobes not developed to regulate emotions
  • Teens believe they are indestructible

28
Indestructible?? What???
29
Sleep (or lack thereof)
  • Melatoninhormone associated with sleep
  • Released at a different time during adolescence
    so time they can fall asleep is much later.
  • Average teen needs 9 ¼ hours
  • Lack of sleep
  • Harder to learn, think creatively, and control
    emotions increase in mood swings, irritability,
    depression and aggressiveness negative effect on
    the immune system

30
Addictions
  • Novelty stimulates dopamine in the brain
  • Alcohol provides pleasure for teens
  • Nicotine causes a dopamine spike
  • Teen smoking can result in a hard-wired
    addiction
  • Drugs are all about feeling goodthen teens
    want MORE of that feeling

Adolescents are particularly susceptible to
addictions like alcohol, nicotine and drugs
because the frontal lobes and hippocampus, the
very regions of the brain that are rapidly
changing in teens, are also the ones associated
with addiction.
31
Depression
  • Probably caused by a combination of genetics,
    environment and biology.
  • Serotonincalming neurotransmitter either
    teenage brain cant properly use it or it is so
    low that the brain cant run smoothly.
  • Neurons in the hippocampus whither and die.
  • Chances of depression increase as we physically
    develop during puberty.
  • As many as 1 in 12 teens suffer from clinical
    depression.
  • Can be a result of stress.
  • Can be a result of poor body image.

32
Suicide
  • Rate of teen suicide has tripled since 1960
  • 3rd leading cause of death among teens
  • 20-30 of HS students consider suicide
  • Can be a result of poor body image

33
Is life REALLY that complicated?
  • For an adolescent, YES!!
  • Burst of growth in the frontal lobes results in
    teens overcomplicating problems, idealizing the
    world, and saying one thing while doing another.

34
Stress and the Teenage Brain
35
Cortisol overload!
  • Neuromodulator released during moment of stress
    (physical, academic, emotional or environmental)
  • Stays in the body a long time
  • Depresses the immune system
  • Affects ability to remember and organize thoughts
  • More difficult reaction for girls because of
    their progesterone.

36
Stress Producers for Teenagers
  • Failing an exam
  • Physical appearance
  • Judgment or evaluation by others
  • Unrealistic classroom demands
  • The future
  • Problems with peers
  • Problems with a boyfriend or girlfriend
  • Any situation that threatens self-esteem
  • Disagreements with teachers, parents or other
    adults

37
What do they really want (though they cant
admit it)
  • Adult guidance and affirmation about who they
    are, what they believe in and where their life is
    headed
  • Structure
  • Specific and timely feedback so their brain can
    reevaluate what it thinks it knows.
  • To be treated as an equal by adults make
    decisions together

38
What the heck should I do??????
39
What we can do for our adolescent learners
tomorrow
  • Add novelty
  • Be emotional
  • Respect their emotions
  • Increase active learning
  • Make it meaningful
  • Give specific and timely feedback
  • Provide direct instruction in problem-solving and
    study skills
  • Develop exploratory programs
  • Connect with kids!

40
Our new understanding of the teenage brain and
its unique characteristics should be reflected in
how we run our schools and our classrooms. Now
that educators and scientists are aware of what
really drives teen cognition and behavior, middle
schools and high schools need to reexamine how
they are structured and how they can better help
their adolescent population.
41
Adolescence is a pivotal time in a persons
development. The changes teens experience
determine much about who they aretheir work
ethic, interests, self-esteem, moralityand who
they will become. This, in turn, shapes our
society teachers play a critical role in
determining the kinds of people who will lead us
into the future. Educating teenagers is not an
easy job but it is a rewarding one. As the world
becomes smaller and our activities more global,
teachers quite literally are changing the
worldone teenager at a time.
42
Julie Ross 517-264-7887 jross_at_sienaheights.edu
43
Bibliography
  • Feinstein, Sheryl. Secrets of the Teenage Brain.
    San
  • Diego, CA The Brain Store, 2004.
  • Gurian, Michael. Boys and Girls Learn
    Differently! A
  • Guide for Teachers and Parents. San Francisco,
  • CA Jossey-Bass, 2001.
  • Jensen, Eric. Brain-Based Learning The New
    Science of Teaching and Training. San Diego,
    CA The Brain Store, 2000.
  • Medina, John. Brain Rules. Seattle, WA Pear
    Press,
  • 2008.
  • Nunley, Kathie F. Keeping Pace with Todays
    Quick
  • Brains, Help4Teachers.com
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