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Integrating Web 2.0 into Accessible Online Learning

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Integrating Web 2.0 into Accessible Online Learning Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D. Interim Dean Center for Distance Learning Kelly Hermann Director College-wide Disability ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Integrating Web 2.0 into Accessible Online Learning


1
Integrating Web 2.0 into Accessible Online
Learning
Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D. Interim Dean Center for
Distance Learning
Kelly Hermann Director College-wide Disability
Services
2
Outline for today
  1. Introductions
  2. Definitions
  3. Emerging Technologies
  4. Online Learning at Empire State College
  5. Why is access important?
  6. Considerations for access
  7. When things dont work right access issues
  8. Conclusion, wrap-up, opportunities for feedback

3
What is a disability?
  • A diagnosed condition that limits a persons
    ability to perform one or more major life
    activities.
  • Major life activities include
  • Reading, writing, learning
  • Seeing, hearing, speaking
  • Thinking, breathing, walking, etc

4
Individual differences disability
  • Each table has been assigned a case
  • You will use this case for the rest of the
    workshop
  • Take a few minutes to get to know your person

5
Accessibility
  • Accessibility individuals are able to
    participate in activities, engage in programs or
    access information

6
Reasonable Accommodations
  • Those modifications made to ensure that
    individuals with disabilities are afforded an
    equal opportunity to participate
  • Legally defined in the ADA, accommodations do
    NOT
  • Fundamentally alter the nature of the program or
    activity
  • Reduce program standards
  • Pose an undue burden.

7
Assistive Technology
  • Software or equipment used to mitigate the impact
    of disability.
  • Many examples
  • Screen readers
  • Screen magnifiers
  • Text-to-speech readers
  • Speech-to-text dictation

8
Adult Learning Theory In brief
  • Many theories regarding how adults learn best and
    what they are looking for in their learning
    experiences
  • Several principles
  • Adults have limited time and attention due to
    competing demands, so
  • Adults want learning experiences to be relevant
    and meaningful
  • Adults want flexibility and individuality in
    their learning
  • Adults want their experience and expertise to
    count

9
Who are you designing for?
10
Who are you designing for?
11
Common Technology Tools
12
Emerging Technologies
LMS
13
Noteworthy TrendsHorizon Report 2011
  1. E-books
  2. Mobiles
  3. Augmented reality
  4. Game-based learning
  5. Gesture based computing
  6. Learning Analytics

14
Noteworthy TrendsHorizon Report 2011
  1. E-books
  2. Mobiles
  3. Augmented reality
  4. Game-based learning
  5. Gesture based computing
  6. Learning Analytics

Pranav Mistry, MIT Media Lab 'Sixth Sense
Device W3C Mobile Web Initiative
15
Noteworthy TrendsMobile Technology
  • "59 of adults now access the internet wirelessly
    using a laptop or cell phone"
  •  
  • "Nearly half of all adults (47) go online with a
    laptop using a Wi-Fi connection or mobile
    broadband car."

The Rise of Apps Culture Pew Internet and
American Life Project
16
Due in part to the web accessibility and
increased engagement many apps provide, it is
logical that apps users are more likely than
other adults to engage in almost every online
activity asked about in the survey. The Rise of
Apps Culture Pew Internet and American Life
Project
17
Impact on learning environments
18
Online learning at Empire State College
  • Center for Distance Learning
  • 500 online courses
  • 45 of total enrollments are online
  • 7,000 students

19
Online learning at Empire State College
  • New course features
  • Blogs
  • Map Blogs
  • Wikis
  • RSS Feeds
  • Second Life
  • E-lluminate video

20
Online learning at Empire State College
  • Working adults
  • Average Age 35
  • Study from locations in
  • New York State
  • United States
  • Global

21
Online learning at Empire State College
  • Common Areas of Study
  • Business, Management and Economics
  • Community and Human Services
  • Science, Math and Technology
  • Humanities

22
Online learning at Empire State College
  • Global Programs
  • International Programs
  • International Distance Learning
  • Nursing Program

23
Benefits and assets of online learning
  • Asynchronous anytime, anyplace
  • Flexibility
  • Small class size (20-22)
  • Individualized Mentoring
  • Peer discussions
  • Emerging technologies
  • Multiple literacies

24
Challenges of online learning
  • Evolving Learning environments
  • Ongoing innovation
  • Scalability
  • Continuity in experience
  • Access to emerging tools
  • Building community

25
Innovation thinking outside the box
  • Mobile Learning Task Force
  • Using iPad to Teach Math
  • Exploring Content Delivery, Communication and
    Convenience with Mobile Technologies
  • Studies in Mobile Media
  • Kindling a Passion for Reading
  • American Popular Music

26
Innovation thinking outside the box
Reading Comprehension
27
Innovation thinking outside the box
Map Blogs
28
Innovation thinking outside the box
Multimedia Timeline
29
Innovation thinking outside the box
Innovation in Online Learning
30
Please fill in the blank
  • But, Kelly, we have always done our
    presentations this way. And ___ ___ _____ ____
    __ _____ ______

31
  • IT HAS NEVER BEEN A PROBLEM BEFORE.

32
Why is access important?
  • Beyond the legal mandates for compliance.
  • Participant expectations and satisfaction
  • The information you need to present is important
    to you and those who need to hear it.

33
Legal basis for requiring access
  • Section 508
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • ADA Amendments Act of 2008
  • NYS Division of Human Rights Law

34
Considerations for access
  • What are the characteristics of your audience?
  • What are the resources available for your use?
  • What tools or products will you be including in
    your online activity?
  • What questions should I be asking? Of my tools
    and resources? Of my content?
  • Always ask - Where are the potential barriers to
    access?

35
Audience issues
  • Disability affects individuals in different ways
    depending on severity, onset, etc.
  • Acquired disabilities vs. congenital
  • Sensory impairments are often the most
    challenging to accommodate

36
Questions to ask tools
  • What is it used for? How much flexibility is
    built in to how the tool can be used?
  • What is the user interface like? How big are the
    icons? Is the interface intuitive? Or are
    detailed directions needed for successful use?
  • Does it use a technology that is known to have
    compatibility issues with assistive technology?
    (e.g., white boards using flash)
  • What does the producer say about accessibility?

37
Examples of common tools
  • Take a look at your tool
  • Think about your case -
  • What are the benefits of using the tool?
  • What potential challenges to access do you see in
    the tool?

38
Questions to ask content
  • Why do I need to include this information?
  • How have I broken this information up into
    pieces? Does it make sense?
  • What language choices can I make to make sure the
    information is clear?
  • How does this information need to be presented?
    Is there information that is communicated either
    completely visually or auditorily that I need to
    present in another way?

39
Addressing Potential Barriers
  • Accessibility is really about increasing
    usability and can benefit all participants, not
    just those with disabilities.
  • Universal design
  • The design of products and environments to be
    usable by all people, to the greatest extent
    possible, without the need for adaptation or
    specialized design.

40
Universal Design
  • Architectural concept developed by Ron Mace, a
    wheelchair user, in 1985

41
Seven Principles of UDFrom the Center for
Universal Design, UNC http//www.ncsu.edu/www/ncs
u/design/sod5/cud/index.htm
  • Equitable Use
  • Flexibility in Use
  • Simple Intuitive Use
  • Perceptible Information
  • Tolerance for Error
  • Low Physical Effort
  • Size Space for Approach Use

42
Universal Design no access issues? Right?
  • WRONG!!
  • A universally designed training or workshop or
    website is the best start you can ask for and
    will eliminate some peoples needs to request
    accommodations but it is not the answer to all
    access issues

43
What would you do?
  • Time to design a new program!
  • You know that the person described in your case
    will be attending.
  • What steps will you take?
  • How can the universal design principles help?

44
Common accommodation needs
  • Correctly formatted documents in electronic
    formats
  • Be careful of PDFs and other file formats!
  • Extra time to process information
  • Assistance from a reader when technologies are
    incompatible or too cumbersome
  • Live chat rooms notoriously difficult to work
    with for a number of disability diagnoses
  • Using outside web resources, e.g., You Tube

45
Other issues
  • Technology can be anxiety provoking for those
    with and without disabilities
  • You are not only asking someone to learn
    something new you may be asking them to learn in
    a way that is foreign to them.

46
How do we fix it?
  • Think about the purpose of the information the
    user needs and then think outside of the box to
    figure out how to make it work.
  • Some examples
  • You Tube assignment
  • Online tutorial service white board use
  • Traffic light example

47
Equality vs. Equivalency
48
FROM THE ACCESS MANIFESTOHTTP//JOECLARK.ORG/BO
OK/SASHAY/SERIALIZATION/ACCESSMANIFESTO.HTML
  • EQUALITY IS A MISNOMER.
  • EQUIVALENCY IS THE GOAL.

49
Thomas P. Mackey, Ph.D. Interim Dean Center for
Distance Learning Tom.Mackey_at_esc.edu
Kelly Hermann Director College-wide Disability
Services Kelly.Hermann_at_esc.edu
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