Sensation and Perception - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Sensation and Perception PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6ca836-OTBkN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Sensation and Perception

Description:

Chapter 4 Sensation and Perception – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:17
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 48
Provided by: rsc85
Learn more at: http://www.bloomhs.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Sensation and Perception


1
Chapter 4
  • Sensation and Perception

2
Section 1
  • Sensation and Perception
  • The Basics

3
Sensation
  • The stimulation of sensory receptors and the
    transmission of sensory information to the
    central nervous system
  • Brain and spinal cord
  • Sensory receptors are located in the eyes, ears
    and elsewhere in the body.
  • The stimulation of the senses is automatic

4
Perception
  • Process through which we interpret sensory
    simulation.
  • Reflects learning, expectations and attitudes.

5
Stimulation of the senses and the ways in which
people interpret that stimulation is effected by
concepts
  • Absolute threshold
  • Difference threshold
  • Signal detection theory
  • Sensory adaptation

6
Absolute Threshold
  • The weakest amount of a stimulus that can be
    sense.
  • Some people are more sensitive than other
  • Hearing test
  • The first sound you can hear

7
Difference Threshold
  • Low enough so we can see, hear, smell, taste, and
    feel
  • But not too low to overload us with information
  • The minimum amount of difference that can be
    detected between 2 stimuli
  • Paint chips
  • Dark-dark
  • Dark-a little lighter

8
Signal Detection Theory
  • A method of distinguishing sensory stimuli that
    takes into account not only their strengths but
    also
  • Setting
  • Your physical state
  • Your mood
  • Your attitudes
  • Also considers psychological factors such as
  • Motivations
  • Expectations
  • Learning
  • We focus on what we deem important.

9
We focus on what we consider important
10
Sensory Adaptation
  • The process by which we become more sensitive to
    real stimuli and less sensitive to unchanged
    stimuli
  • Low light in a theater
  • Noise of the city

11
Section 2
  • Vision

12
Seeing is believing
  • Why do we put so much more trust in evidence that
    we have seen than evidence we have heard?

13
The eye
  • Very similar to a camera
  • The amount of light entering the eye determines
    the size of the pupil.
  • Very similar to a camera
  • The amount of light entering the eye determines
    the size of the pupil.

14
Lens Retina
  • Adjusts to the distance of objects by changing
    its thickness
  • When you squint, youre adjusting the thickness.
  • The sensitive surface in the eye that acts like
    film in a camera
  • Photoreceptors
  • Neurons that are sensitive to light
  • Carry visual input to the brain

15
2 type kinds of photoreceptors
  • Cones
  • Allow you to see in color

Blind Spot The Point where the optic nerve leaves
they eye. We would never be able to see without
it.
  • Rods
  • Sensitive to brightness of light
  • Allow you to see in black and white

16
Adaptation Dark light
  • Walk into a dark room too dark to find a seat
  • Starts to adjust to lower light
  • Will continue for 45 minutes
  • Walking into a bright room
  • A first blink/ hurts
  • Within a minute you can see
  • Adaptation to light happens a lot faster

17
Visual acuity
  • Determined by the ability to see visual details
    in normal light
  • Nearsighted
  • Can not see details farther away
  • Farsighted
  • Can not see details close up

18
Color Vision
  • Afterimages
  • Complementary color of the original color.
    Staring at one will create an afterimage of
    another

19
Color Vision
  • Color blindness
  • Partially or totally unable to distinguish color
    due to the absence of or malfunction in the cones
  • Color Vision

20
  • Optical Illusions
  • Mona Lisa

21
Section 3
  • Hearing

22
Hearing
  • Sound is caused by the changes in air pressure
    that result from vibration.
  • Each vibration is called a cycle or a sound wave.
  • Every wave has its own pitch and loudness.

23
(No Transcript)
24
Pitch
  • Pitch of a sound
  • How low and high the sound is depends on its
    frequency or the of cycle per second
  • More cycles the higher the sound
  • Women- short
  • Higher voices
  • Men- long
  • Lower voices

25
Loudness
  • is determined by the amplitude of sound waves
  • Is measured by decibels

26
Deafness
  • Conductive
  • Occurs because of damage to the middle ear
    (hearing aids)
  • Sensorineural
  • Damage to the inner ear
  • Concerts---jobs

27
  • Can you hear this

28
Help of the Deaf
  • Implants
  • Sign language
  • Closed captioned shows
  • Use of light as
  • alter devices
  • Sign Language

29
Would You Rather?
  • Lose your eyesight or hearing?
  • WHY?

30
Section 4

Other senses
31
Do you have food cravings?
32
Do you have food cravings?
  • Research suggest women are more likely to crave
    sweet foods with lots of fat such as chocolate.
  • Men are prone to crave foods high in protein and
    fat, such as burgers and lasagna.
  • Do you think food cravings are influenced by
    societal standards?

33
Chemical senses
  • Smell
  • Dogs have 7 times stronger sense of smell than
    humans
  • Without it could not taste as much.
  • Olfactory Nerve
  • Adapts quickly
  • Locker room
  • Perfume
  • Smoke
  • Harmful fumes
  • Taste
  • Dogs taste sweetness cats can not.
  • 4 basic qualities
  • Sweetness
  • Saltiness
  • Sourness
  • bitterness

34
The Taste Buds
  1. Bitter
  2. Sour
  3. Sweet
  4. Salty

35
The Skin Senses Pressure Temperature
  • Sensory receptors fire when the skin is touched
  • Fingertips, lips, nose and cheeks are more
    sensitive
  • Shoulders, thighs and calves less sensitive.
  • Is relative
  • Neurons just beneath the skin
  • Adapt to difference in temperature
  • Pool water
  • Going out into heat from an air conditioned
    building

36
Pain
  • Gate theory
  • A certain amount of information can be processed
    at a time. Rubbing/ scratching interrupts the
    pain message
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Pain in missing limbs
  • Stored memories of missing limb

37
Pain
38
Video
  • Helen Keller

39
Section 5
  • Perception-
  • The way we organize or make sense of our
    sensory impressions

40
Closure
  • Tendency to perceive a complete or whole figure
    even when there are gaps in what your sense tell
    you.

41
Figure ground perception
  • Is the perception of figures against a
    background.
  • Look out a window
  • People, dogs, cars, trees, houses on a background

42
Proximity
43
  • A presentation showing slide examples of the
    Gestalt Theory's principle of Proximity in
    different mediums of advertising, art and
    photography.
  • Gestalt Theory Principle Proximity

44
Similarity- people think of similar objects
belonging together.
45
The rule of Continuity
  • The perceptual tendency to group stimuli into
    continuous patterns.
  • People prefer to see smooth continuous patterns
    not disrupted ones.

46
Common Fate
  • Things moving in the same direction are perceived
    as belonging together.
  • Example Group of runners people running together
    in the same direction would appear to have the
    same purpose.

47
Visual Illusions
  • Illusions
About PowerShow.com