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Why do we need Assistive Listening?

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ALD Introduction Why do we need Assistive Listening? User Interface Options Transmission Options Examples of ALDs and ALSs Finding and Using ALDs and ALSs – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Why do we need Assistive Listening?


1
ALD Introduction
  • Why do we need Assistive Listening?
  • User Interface Options
  • Transmission Options
  • Examples of ALDs and ALSs
  • Finding and Using ALDs and ALSs
  • Latest Stuff
  • Recommendations

2
Why We Need ALDs
  • Hearing Aids and CIs Best in Quiet and Close
  • Not so good at a distance
  • Not so good in noise
  • Not so good when sounds bounce around
  • ALDs can solve those Big Three problems
  • Bring the sound you want to hear right to your
    ears
  • Eliminate or at least reduce the noise
  • Eliminate the reverberation (bounced sound)
  • Minimize the loss of signal from conversion
  • Make a HUGE difference in how much you understand

3
The Big Three
  • Distance
  • Double the distance QUADRUPLE the loss
  • Varies with frequency (highs dont travel well)
  • Noise
  • What you want to hear is easy to lose in the din
  • The signal to noise ratio matters
  • Reverberation
  • Even without noise, sound you want to hear gets
    spread out as it bounces around the room
  • Hear the straight line first, but then delayed
    versions of the same thing at lower volume.

4
Reverberation
Reverberation and echos reduce speech
intelligibility
5
Hearing Your Best
  • The TV from Across the Room
  • On the Phone
  • In the car
  • Your Friends at Dinner
  • At the Museum
  • At the Movies
  • At a Play
  • In a Noisy Restaurant
  • Other Audio Sources
  • Radios
  • Music Players
  • iPods

6
Hearing Aids and CIs
  • Hearing aids and CIs have microphones for Input
  • microphones hear everything
  • Background noise
  • Reverberation
  • Poor quality signal after distance.
  • Some hearing aids and CIs have other input
    options

7
Other Input Paths
  • The following input paths can be used instead of
    or in addition to the hearing aid or CIs
    microphones.
  • Magnetic
  • Analog Telecoil
  • Digital Near Field Magnet Input (NFMI)
  • Direct Audio Input (DAI)
  • FM Receivers
  • Boot
  • Embedded
  • By having access to these alternatives, you can
    choose how to hear best in every situation.
  • Get your audiologist to set up your programs and
    explain how to use them

8
Interface Options
  • Headphones (no Hearing Aids or Cis or telecoils)
  • Headphones (with telecoils in Hearing Aids or
    Cis)
  • Earbuds (usually only works without hearing aids)
  • Neckloops
  • Standard Analog (to telecoils)
  • Near Field Magnetic Interface (NFMI) digital
    induction
  • Silhouettes (to telecoils)
  • FM
  • Boots (to DAI)
  • Embedded
  • Patch cord (to DAI)

9
Personal Amplifiers
  • Pocketalker (or similar)
  • Wired
  • Connect Via
  • Neckloop
  • Silhouettes
  • DAI
  • Headphones
  • 140

10
Personal FM Solutions
  • Transmit sound from transmitter to receiver by FM
    radio.
  • Directional Microphones
  • You choice of Interface

11
Personal IR Solutions
  • Transmit sound from transmitter to receiver by
    Infrared light.
  • Directional Microphones
  • Some let you choose interface
  • Mostly for TV (not very portable)

12
Personal Loops
  • Room loops
  • TV
  • Computer
  • Chairpad loops
  • Tableloops

13
Bluetooth
  • Bluetooth uses a digital signal to communicate
    between a pendant and paired audio sources
  • It can be two-way so it can work with phones
    both in and out
  • Transmission/receiving done in pairs not a
    broadcast
  • Digitally encoded, so its private
  • Your Bluetooth device can remember several
    different pairings and reconnect automatically
  • Only connects with one paired device at a time

14
Bluetooth
  • So far, there are no Bluetooth Hearing Aid or CIs
  • Bluetooth loopsets can connect you to phones (and
    TVs, iPods, Tablets, Computers and remote mics)
  • Standard Bluetooth
  • NFMI
  • Oticon
  • Phonak
  • Bluetooth to Device
  • Standard Analog Magnetic to Hearing Aids/Cis
  • Advantages
  • Cheap
  • Not Proprietary
  • Disadvantages
  • Bilateral but Mono
  • Possible EMI (interference)
  • Bluetooth to Device
  • NFMI Magnetic to Hearing Aids/CIs
  • Advantages
  • Some are True Stereo
  • No Interference
  • Disadvantages
  • More Expensive
  • Proprietary

15
Bluetooth NFMI
16
Bluetooth Analog
17
Bluetooth
  • Good
  • Relatively cheap
  • Some are Integrated with remote controls
  • Some are true stereo
  • No Electromagnetic Interferences (unlike regular
    telecoils)
  • Possible issues
  • Short range (maybe 30 ft)
  • NFMI is Proprietary must match your hearing
    aids
  • Uses a lot of power (so far) it must be a pendant
  • Processing delay can be more than 25 ms
  • Ok for phone calls or listening to music or radio
  • May be distracting if watching TV or other video

18
Systems
  • Assistive Listening Systems
  • FM
  • IR
  • Loops
  • Installation
  • Permanent
  • Portable
  • Movies, Auditoriums, Theaters, Stadiums,
    Churches, Classrooms,

19
Jacks and Plugs
  • Mono (1 ring, 2 sections)
  • Stereo (2 ring, 3 sections)
  • Cell Phone (3 rings, 4 sections)
  • Stereo to Mono Adaptor
  • Male to Male Adaptor
  • RCA to male 3.5 mm
  • Optical

20
Simple Mic to TV
  • Place a good mic near the TV
  • Patch it via wire or your favorite wireless to
    your ALD of choice
  • FM
  • IR
  • Bluetooth
  • Use your favorite interface
  • Headphones
  • Earbuds
  • Neckloop
  • Silhouette(s)
  • Works, but better to patch directly to the TV

21
Patching to a TV
  • Then with appropriate adaptor
  • to your favorite interface
  • Bluetooth TV adaptor
  • FM
  • InfraRed
  • Stereo System
  • Room Loop
  • Headset
  • May need a stereo/mono adaptor
  • May need different style jack
  • Some newer TVs dont have line outs, but use an
    Optical audio output. You would need a d/a
    converter to patch to most ALDs.

22
Finding Systems
  • Signs
  • IR
  • Loops
  • ALDs
  • Websites
  • www.aldlocator.com
  • www.loopamerica.org
  • http//www.americanhearingloop.com/hearing-loop-lo
    cations.html
  • www.captionfish.com
  • http//www.hearinglossweb.com/tech/ald/loop/loop.h
    tm

23
Resources
  • www.ncatp.org
  • Information
  • Trial equipment
  • www.ncdhhs.gov/dsdhh/
  • Regional Centers
  • Equipment Distribution
  • www.nchearingloss.org
  • Glossary defines terms
  • HLAA Conventions
  • Dont miss the exhibit area

24
Recommendations
  • Look for where you could benefit from Assistive
    Technology.
  • Consider which technologies meet your needs.
  • Try out the technology in various situations.
  • Never buy a hearing aid that doesnt have
    standard telecoils
  • Get your telecoils activated and tuned to your
    needs.
  • Learn how to change to the best program for each
    situation.
  • Consider other options such as a personal
    amplifier, Bluetooth, FM or IR
  • Standard telecoils are NOT obsolete
  • Some aids have both NFMI and standard telecoils.

25
Latest Stuff
  • Roger FM (by Phonak but supports most brands)
  • Pen mic
  • Clipon mic
  • Boot or embedded receivers
  • Cochlear Dynamic FM
  • For BAHA
  • For Nucleus CI (soon)
  • MFi (Made for iPhone) hearing aids
  • Some direct to aids from several manufacturers
  • Some to a gateway device

26
Questions?
  • Now
  • Ill stay as long as you like
  • Later
  • Email me at steve.barber_at_earthlink.net
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