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Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction

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Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction Consistent Use of High Leverage Instructional Strategies Know Your Students Thoroughly Effective – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction


1
Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction
Know Your Students Thoroughly Consistent Use of High Leverage Instructional Strategies
Thorough Knowledge of the Curriculum Effective Management Strategies
2
Teachers Can Differentiate
Content
Process
Product
According to Students
Interest
Learning Profile
Readiness
3
Learning Inventories
  • Modality
  • Auditory, visual, kinesthetic
  • Sternberg
  • Analytical, creative, practical
  • Gardner
  • Multiple Intelligence preference

4
Technology Tool! Learning Style Inventory
http//ttc.coe.uga.edu/surveys
There is also an Intelligence Survey on this
pagealso a good tool to use!
5
Learner Profile Card
Gender Stripe
Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic Learning Style
Analytical, Creative, Practical Sternberg
Students Interests
Multiple Intelligence Preference Gardner
Favorite Subject
6
Sample Learner Card
Tomlinson 03
7
Technology Tool! Lets do a Brain Dump Think
Dots
  1. Summarize ideas up to now.
  2. Make a differentiated instruction connection to
    technology.
  3. Plan how to use the ideas presented so far in
    your current setting.
  4. Name one important piece of information that you
    heard up to this point that made you think
    differently about differentiated instruction.
  5. Name one important piece of information you heard
    so far that you can apply to your position
    immediately.
  6. Name one thing we discussed up to now that you
    want to hear more about.

Think Dots
http//www.bgfl.org/bgfl/custom/resources_ftp/clie
nt_ftp/ks1/maths/dice/
8
Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction
Know Your Students Thoroughly Consistent Use of High Leverage Instructional Strategies
Thorough Knowledge of the Curriculum Effective Management Strategies
9
First Step in Designing Differentiated Curriculum
is to
  • FOCUS!

Learning Goals Knows, Understands, Be able to
Dos
10
Youve got to go below the surface...
11
to uncover the really big ideas.
12
Planning a Focused Curriculum Means Clarity About
What Students Should
  • KNOW
  • Facts
  • Vocabulary
  • Definitions
  • UNDERSTAND
  • Principles/ generalizations
  • Big ideas of the discipline
  • BE ABLE TO DO
  • Processes
  • Skills

13
KNOW
  • Facts, names, dates, places, information
  • 4 quadrants in a coordinate plane
  • Fibonacci Number
  • Oxymoron
  • Pythagorean Theorem
  • The multiplication tables

14
UNDERSTAND
  • Essential truths that give meaning to the topic
  • Stated as a full sentence
  • Begin with, I want students to understand THAT
    (not HOW or WHY or WHAT)
  • Multiplication is another way to do addition.
  • There are a lot of ways to represent single
    number.
  • There is more than one way to solve a problem.
  • Make reasonable estimates.

15
BE ABLE TO DO
  • Skills (basic skills, skills of the discipline,
    skills of independence, social skills, skills of
    production)
  • Verbs or phrases (not the whole activity)
  • Analyze
  • Solve a problem to find perimeter
  • Find the decimal of 3/8 by using equivalent
    fractions.
  • Evaluate work according to specific criteria
  • Use a bar graph to represent data appropriately

16
  • When a teacher tries to teach something to the
    entire class at the same time, chances are
    one-third of the kids already know it one-third
    will get it and the remaining third wont. So
    two-thirds of the children are wasting their
    time.
  • Lillian Katz

17
The Teachers Challenge
  • Developing--
  • Respectful Activities
  • Interesting
  • Engaging
  • Challenging

18
Respectful Tasks the Equalizer
Readiness level matches level of cognitive
complexity Expect all students to
grow Appropriate levels of difficulty All tasks
are interesting, important, and engaging for all
students
19
The Equalizer
  • Foundational Transformational
  • Concrete Abstract
  • 3. Simple Complex
  • 4. Single Facet Multiple Facets
  • 5. Small Leap Great Leap
  • 6. More Structured More Open
  • 7. Less Independence Greater Independence
  • 8. Slow Quick

Information, Ideas, Materials, Applications Rep
resentations, Ideas, Applications,
Materials Resources, Research, Issues,
Problems, Skills, Goals Directions, Problems,
Application, Solutions, Approaches, Disciplinary
Connections Application, Insight,
Transfer Solutions, Decisions,
Approaches Planning, Designing,
Monitoring Pace of Study, Pace of Thought
20

Equalizer Troubleshooting Tips
  • All students need lessons that are rich and
    engaging. Try not to make drill and practice as
    the staple of students school diets.
  • Your students sense of self-efficacy comes
    from recognizing their power AFTER accomplishing
    something they first thought was just too big
    for them. Design lessons that stretch all
    students beyond.
  • A task is challenging for a given student when it
    causes that student to stand on mental tip toes
    and reach high to complete it well.

21
This is Boring!
These words do not bring happiness to the hearts
of teachers.
2 kinds of bored
Boring A I already know that could you give
me an opportunity to show you?
Boring B At the present time I do not know
enough about the topic to be interested in it.
22
Differentiated by readiness
  • Pre-assessment survey of technical readiness
    (multimedia, desktop publishing and Web page
    creation)
  • After reading a novel, students were presented
    with the following situation
  • You are the publicist for the new paperback
    version of the novel. Your task is to create an
    advertisement that is both informative and
    persuasive. Advertisements can take many forms.
  • The teacher assigns one of the following forms
    for presenting the advertisement
  • Group A story board for a TV ad using
    PowerPoint
  • Group B informational flyer for distribution at
    book stores, using desktop publishing program
    (Print Shop, MS Word, Publisher)
  • Group C Web page promoting the novel

23
AssessmentPre, During and Post Instruction





24
Strategies to Assess the Learners
  • What Do I Assess?
  • Interests
  • Abilities
  • Rate of learning
  • Work/learning styles and strength
  • Needs

25
Pre-Assessment
  • What the student already knows about what is
    being planned
  • What standards, objectives, concepts skills the
    individual student understands
  • What further instruction and opportunities for
    mastery are needed
  • What requires reteaching or enhancement
  • What areas of interests and feelings are in the
    different areas of the study
  • How to set up flexible groups Whole, individual,
    partner, or small group

26
Assessment Before Instruction
  • To develop teacher knowledge about what the
    students know or have experienced
  • Written record review
  • IEPs
  • Student information
  • Interest surveys and inventories
  • Pretests
  • Admit slips
  • Whip Around
  • K-W-L
  • Concept splash

27
Things/people that have influenced you
Things that tell something about you
Your Name
28
Ongoing Assessment The Key to A Differentiated
Classroom
29
Ongoing Assessment
  • Evaluates understanding of key concepts
  • Can be differentiated
  • Drives instruction
  • Occurs consistently before, during, and at end of
    unit (pre-assessment, formative, and summative

30
Squaring Off Whole Group Assessment
  • 1. Place a card in each corner of the room
    with one of the following words or phrases that
    are effective ways to group according to learner
    knowledge.
  • Rarely ever Sometimes Often I
    have it!
  • Dirt road Paved road Highway
    Yellow brick road
  • Tell the students to go to the corner of the room
    that matches their place in the learning journey.
  • Participants go to the corner that most closely
    matches their own learning status and discuss
    what they know about the topic and why they chose
    to go there.

Gregory, G.H. Chapman, C. (2001).
Differentiated Instructional Strategies One
Size Doesnt Fit All. Thousand Oaks CA Corwin
Press.
31
(No Transcript)
32
Yes/No Cards
  1. Using a 4x6 index card the student writes YES on
    one side and NO on the other.
  2. When a question is asked the students hold up YES
    or NO.
  3. Ask the students if they know the following
    vocabulary words and what they mean.
  4. Call out a word. If a student is holding a YES
    they may be called on to give the correct answer.
  5. Remind them that if they dont know the words it
    is OK because they will be learning them.
  6. You can do the same thing with conceptual ideas,
    etc.

Gregory, G.H. Chapman, C. (2001).
Differentiated Instructional Strategies One
Size Doesnt Fit All. Thousand Oaks CA Corwin
Press.
33
(No Transcript)
34
Thumb It
  • Have students respond with the position of their
    thumb to get an assessment of what their current
    understanding of a topic being studied.
  • Where I am now in my understanding of ______?

Gregory, G.H. Chapman, C. (2001).
Differentiated Instructional Strategies One
Size Doesnt Fit All. Thousand Oaks CA
Corwin Press.
35
(No Transcript)
36
Fist of Five
  • Show the number of fingers on a scale, with 1
    being lowest and 5 the highest.
  • Ask, How well do you feel you
  • know this information?
  • I know it so well I could explain it to anyone.
  • I can do it alone.
  • I need some help.
  • I could use more practice.
  • 1. I am only beginning.

Gregory, G.H. Chapman, C. (2001).
Differentiated Instructional Strategies One
Size Doesnt Fit All. Thousand Oaks CA Corwin
Press.
37
Assessment eSchool Builder http//elearning.ciu20
.org/courses Zoomerang (subscription)
http//www.zoomerang.com Profiler
Pro http//www.profilerpro.com/ Advanced Survey
(basic one is free) http//www.advancedsurvey.com/
Quia (subscription)- At 50 per educator??? We
have 1 or 2 that subscribe http//www.quia.com Cla
ssroom Performance System- We have 3 systems, all
at HS http//www.einstruction.com/ Easy Test
Maker http//www.easytestmaker.com
38
Assessment in a Differentiated Classroom
  • ASSESSMENT
  • drives instruction.
  • occurs consistently as the unit begins,
    throughout the unit and as the unit ends.
  • focuses on student readiness, interest and
    learning profile.
  • information helps students chart and contribute
    to their own growth.
  • MAY be differentiated.
  • demonstrates personal growth.

39
(No Transcript)
40
What Have We Learned?Using your identified
learning modality, develop a product from the
list below to represent what you learned from
today.
Auditory Visual Kinesthetic/ Tactual
Comedy monologue Symbolic representation cheer
Song/rap Comic strip commercial
Radio announcement Advertisement Role play
41
Essential Skills for Differentiated Instruction
Know Your Students Thoroughly Consistent Use of High Leverage Instructional Strategies
Thorough Knowledge of the Curriculum Effective Management Strategies
42
10 Strategies for Managing a Differentiated
Classroom
  1. Have a strong rationale for differentiating
    instruction based on student readiness, interest
    and learning profile.
  2. Begin differentiating at a pace that is
    comfortable for you.
  3. Tine differentiated activities for student
    success.
  4. Use an anchor activity to free you up to focus
    your attention on your students.
  5. Create and deliver instructions carefully.

43
10 Strategies for Managing a Differentiated
Classroom
  1. Have a home base for students.
  2. Be sure students have a plan for getting help
    when you are busy with another student or group.
  3. Give your students as much responsibility for
    their learning as possible.
  4. Engage your students in talking about classroom
    procedures and group processes.
  5. Use flexible grouping.

44
Giving Directions
  • If the whole class is doing the same activity
    then give the directions to the whole group.
  • Do not give multiple task directions to the whole
    class.
  • For small group work, tape directions so students
    can listen to them repeatedly
  • Use task cards to give directions to small
    groups.
  • A general rule is that once the teacher has given
    directions the students cant interrupt while
    he/she is working with a small group
  • Ask 3 Before Me

45
Transitions
  • Directions for transitions need to be given with
    clarity and urgency.
  • Time limit for transition
  • Address the acceptable noise level
  • Rehearsal

46
Routines for Handling Paperwork
  • Color-coded work folders
  • Portfolios
  • Baskets for each curricular area or class period
  • Filing Cabinet
  • The key to these organizational patterns is that
    the children have access to their own work and
    know how to file and/or find what they need to
    accomplish a task.

47
Handling Materials
  • Assign jobs to different students (materials
    handler, table captain)
  • As a teacher ask yourself, Is this something I
    have to do myself, or can the students learn to
    do it?
  • Remember that you have to teach children how to
    become responsible for their own things.

48
Time
  • Must be flexible in order to address every
    childs readiness level
  • Catch-up days
  • Anchoring Activities
  • Postcards for Writing Ideas
  • Independent Investigations

49
Flexible Grouping
  • Students are a part of as many different groups
    and have opportunities to.
  • work alone
  • or in groups based on matching the task to
    student readiness, interest, and/or learning
    style.

50
Flexible Grouping
  • Should be purposeful
  • may be based on student interest, learning
    profile and/or readiness
  • may be based on needs observed during learning
    times
  • geared to accomplish curricular goals (K-U-D)
  • Implementation
  • purposefully plan using information collected
    interest surveys, learning profile inventories,
    exit cards, quick writes, observations, etc.
  • list groups on an overhead place in folders or
    mailboxes
  • on the fly as invitational groups
  • Cautions
  • avoid turning groups into tracking situations
  • provide opportunities for students to work within
    a variety of groups
  • practice moving into group situations and
    assuming roles within the group

51
Assigning Groups
  • Clothes pins with students names to assign them
    to a particular task
  • Color code children to certain groups (a
    transparency with students names in color works
    well)
  • Cubing allows you to assign groups by interest or
    readiness level
  • Content Partner/Buddies

52
Partners Design Page
53
Clock Buddies
  • Flexible Groups
  • Ability Group
  • Achievement
  • Pretest
  • Exit Card
  • Task Group
  • Learning Style
  • Interest
  • Random

54
Homogeneous Groups
  • Affects of homogeneous grouping
  • High ability group Advanced
  • Medium ability group Proficient
  • Medium low ability group Basic
  • Lowest ability group Below Basic
  • (Marzano, 2001)

55
(No Transcript)
56
http//www.kennesaw.edu/education/soap/rex/keynote
.ppt256,1, Differentiating Instruction The
Journey
57
So its not just about this
58
Its about this!
  • Product - The way in which a students knowledge
    of a subject is assessed
  • Process - The way in which a student gains access
    to knowledge
  • Content - The depth/complexity of the knowledge
    base a student explores

59
Differentiated Instruction and Some Technology to
Support it
  • Technologys Influence on Differentiated
    Instruction
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