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Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils

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Title: Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils


1
Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils
  • HSU Academic Senate, Nov. 10, 2009

2
Outline of Presentation
  • Prioritization thus far (see senate packet)
  • Response to prioritization (today)
  • 3. How RRWS serves CSU and HSU Mission and
    Vision
  • 4. A reasonable proposal

3
1. Prioritization thus far
  • Designated Category IV by teams and task force.
  • CNRS Dean proposed a minor only or consolidation
    of options , thus weakening competitiveness of
    graduates according to federal OPM standards for
    Soil Scientists, Rangeland Management
    Specialists, etc.
  • Provost recommended elimination in favor of a
    minor only or a set of courses that support
    related majors.

4
1. Prioritization thus farAMP/ICC
  • The Academic Master Planning subcommittee,
    chaired by Cindy Moyer is to be commended for
    their close and careful reading of supporting
    materials.

5
1. Prioritization thus farICC summary
  • RRWS Supports HSU Mission
  • Program prepares graduates well according to
    federal OPM standards
  • RRWS graduates average 7 students per year, low
    enrollment in upper division classes (see
    comments in section 3 of this presentation)
  • RRWS did not address the possibility of a minor
    only configuration (see comments below)

6
1. Prioritization thus farICC summary, cont.
  • Proposed curricular changes reduce units to
    graduate from 128 to 120, with 70 units of
    coursework in common between the two options, and
    17 units of specialized courses for each option
    (including 4 unique required courses in each
    option.)
  • ICC feels that the above courses will continue to
    have low enrollments. (see comments below)
  • Based on the above factors, the ICC concluded
    that the program had not demonstrated any
    significant changes in the strengths and
    weaknesses that were used in making the
    prioritization ranking. (see comments below)

7
Questions thus far?
  • After extensive discussion, the ICC voted to
    recommend to the Senate that the Rangeland
    Resources and Wildland Soils Programs should be
    eliminated. The vote was 11 for elimination, 3
    against elimination, and 1 abstention.

8
2. Response to Prioritization Summary of
Points from RRWS perspective
  • A. No revision of prioritization score despite
    requests made by RRWS.
  • B. Low graduates and enrollments? please
  • consider data after prioritization snapshot
  • (see below).
  • C. Why not a minor only?

9
2. Response to Prioritization
10
2. Response, cont.
  • Vision - We received only 3 out of 4 for
    adherence to vision, the same score as one
    program that used an outdated mission
    statement.
  • Snapshot in fall 2008 was worst possible.
  • Demand indicators have improved since
    prioritization snapshot (new data)

11
2. Response Major headcounts up 60 since
prioritization snapshot
12
2. Response Gender balance (Spring 2009 data)
13
2. Response Average enrollment per upper
division RRS class up 75 relative to snapshot
date (and will increase with growth in Ecological
Restoration and Forestry)
14
2. Response Average enrollment per upper
division SOIL class up 32 relative to snapshot
date (and will increase with growth in Ecological
Restoration and Forestry)
15
2. Response Combined SCUs up 20 relative to
snapshot date
16
2. Response Combined FTES up 20 relative to
snapshot date
17
2. Response RRWS SFRs are increasing and
comparable to CNRS averages
18
Graduation Rates RRS projects an increase in
graduates in Spring-Fall 2010
19
2. Response - Low graduates?
  • Projected RRWS graduates
  • Fall 2009 -Michael Dieter, Niko Daoussis,
  • Amy Meredith, Tina Norris
  • (8) Spring 2010 Jerome Cimino, Dustin
    Detweiler, Lauren Herstead, Ashley Hodge, Matt
    Meil, Rio Patton, Heidi Ruhling, Matt Schiff
  • (5) Fall 2010 Chelsea Hansen, Angie Hart,
    Sarah Schuette, Austin Tomlinson, Stuart
    Wilson
  • Scholarships totaling more than 15,000
  • Gave undergraduate research poster at Soil
    Science Society of America meetings (Nov. 2009)

20
2. Response - Faculty productivity?
  • Based on a pending FERP faculty decision and on
    the eve of the other facultys sabbatical leave.
  • 144,000 USDA grant to support student diversity,
    25,000 McIntire Stennis funding and 30,000
    Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and
    Extension Grants awarded after
    prioritization snapshot.
  • 271,000 for HSU USDA Multicultural Scholars
    (award notification Jan. 2010, submitted)
  • 500,000 in collaboration with other
    universities range programs, USDA Higher
    Education Challenge, to be submitted Feb. 2010,
    notification Summer 2010. Unified competencies,
    outcomes, assessment and shared delivery will be
    the focus of grant proposal

21
2. Response - Why not a minor?
  • Program, as it stands, has a high level of
    integrity and produces well educated and highly
    sought after graduates (our first priority).
  • If we were to coalesce soils courses and students
    into the Forest Soils option, we would lose many
    soils students who are interested in
    sustainable/organic agriculture.
  • As noted by ICC, we have the only Range Resource
    Science undergraduate degree in California, a
    state that requires professional
    certification/licensure under Forest Practice
    Rules.

22
Summary thoughts about prioritization
  • The prioritization process was completed with the
    ICCs recommendation.
  • Recommendations from the Academic Senate and
    decisions by the Provost and President Richmond
    are forthcoming.
  • Little input from students and HSUs regional
    constituency has been considered in this process,
    although about 30 letters of support have been
    received.

23
  • Before continuing to a review of HSU Mission and
    Vision, are there any questions?

24
3. How RRWS serves the CSU and HSU Mission
  • Background Dean Hedrick championed a
    comprehensive suite of natural resources
    disciplines in a coherent package for HSU that
    was in place in the 1960s.
  • Since that that time, HSU has become recognized
    nationally and internationally as a premier
    undergraduate destination for these studies.

25
3. How RRWS serves the CSU Mission
  • http//www.calstate.edu/PA/info/mission.shtm
  • To accomplish its mission over time and under
    changing conditions, the California State
    University
  • Offers degree programs in academic and applied
    areas that are responsive to the needs of the
    citizens of this state and provides for regular
    review of the nature and extent of these
    programs.
  • HSU has the ONLY Range undergraduate program in
    California, one of two on the west coast, and has
    one of only three major or minor programs in soil
    science in California.

26
Recall how many other CSU campuses share HSUs
majors
  • 23 Business Administration, Biology, English.
    Liberal Studies, Psychology
  • 21 Art, Chemistry, Economics, History,
    Kinesiology, Political Science
  • 20 Interdisciplinary Studies, Music,
    Sociology, Spanish
  • 19 Math, Philosophy, Theater Arts
  • 18 Nursing, Physics
  • 17 Geography
  • 15 Communications, French
  • 12 Child Development, Environmental Science,
    Recreation Administration
  • 11 German
  • 9 International Studies, Journalism, Social
    Work, Women's Studies
  • 8 Religious Studies
  • 7 Ethnic Studies, industrial Technology
  • 6 Dance Studies
  • 5 Computer Science
  • 3 Environmental Resources Engineering, Soil
    Science
  • 2 Anthropology, Botany or Plant Science,
    Forestry, Physical Science, Watershed, Wildlife
  • 1 (HSU ONLY) Fisheries Biology, Native
    American Studies, Natural Resources Planning
    Interpretation, Oceanography, Rangeland Resource
    Wildland Soils

27
3. How RRWS serves HSU
  • THE VISION of Humboldt State University
  • Humboldt State University will be the campus of
    choice for individuals who seek above all else to
    improve the human condition and our environment.
    We will be the premier center for the
    interdisciplinary study of the environment and
    its natural resources.
  • Range Resource Science is an essential part of
    natural resources disciplines 62 of
    Californias land area is RANGELAND.

28
  • Many of Californias and the Wests tribal lands
    consist of Forest and Rangelands.
  • Much of BLM and Forest Service land (green and
    taupe colors) is rangeland.

29
3. How RRWS addresses selected HSU Core Values
  • We believe our location is an ecologically and
    spiritually rich asset that we embrace as an
    integral part of our learning community. Our
    curriculum is relevant, collaborative and
    responsive to our geographical location.
  • We believe the University is an integral part of
    our local and regional communities.
  • ________________________________________
  • What does our region need?
  • Please refer to fastest growing occupations
    handout

30
FASTEST GROWING OCCUPATIONS 2006-2016 North Coast
Region (Humboldt, Lake, Del Norte, Mendocino
Counties) Education Training Levels
1professional degree, 2doctoral degree, 3M.S.,
4 Bachelors or higher plus work experience,
5Bachelors (Omitted jobs with less than a B.S.
Degree) Source http//www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.
gov/?pageid146,
SOC Code Occupational Title Annual Average Employment Annual Average Employment Percent Change Wages and Training Wages and Training Wages and Training  
SOC Code Occupational Title 2006 2016 Percent Change Median Hourly 1 Median Annual 1 Education Training Levels 3 net change
25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education 1,460 1,670 14.4 2 53,991 5 210
25-2022 Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education 690 780 13.0 2 60,575 5 90
11-9011 Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers 650 730 12.3 28.02 58,274 4 80
25-9031 Instructional Coordinators 220 280 27.3 32.89 68,399 3 60
29-1051 Pharmacists 220 280 27.3 58.82 122,339 1 60
13-1111 Management Analysts 330 390 18.2 23.38 48,644 4 60
13-2011 Accountants and Auditors 540 590 9.3 22.20 46,193 5 50
39-9032 Recreation Workers 550 600 9.1 9.84 20,463 5 50
15-1051 Computer Systems Analysts 140 180 28.6 33.20 69,076 5 40
25-2041 Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School 170 210 23.5 2 58,247 5 40
19-2041 Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health 140 170 21.4 33.89 70,491 5 30
25-2012 Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education 180 210 16.7 2 51,386 5 30
11-9033 Education Administrators, Postsecondary 190 220 15.8 33.80 70,315 4 30
21-1092 Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists 210 240 14.3 14.83 30,846 5 30
19-3031 Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists 130 150 15.4 33.64 69,958 2 20
21-1021 Child, Family, and School Social Workers 180 200 11.1 18.50 38,486 5 20
27-3031 Public Relations Specialists 120 130 8.3 16.27 33,851 5 10
31
2006-2016 Fastest Growing Occupations North
Mountains Region (Lassen, Modoc, Nevada, Plumas,
Sierra, Siskiyou, and Trinity Counties)
SOC Code Occupational Title Annual Average Employment Annual Average Employment Percent Change Wages and Training Wages and Training Wages and Training  
SOC Code Occupational Title 2006 2016 Percent Change Median Hourly 1 Median Annual 1 Education Training Levels 3 Net change
25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education 1,330 1,480 11.3 2 55,714 5 150
19-4093 Forest and Conservation Technicians 1,080 1,220 13.0 15.57 32,384 6 (A.S.) 140
13-1111 Management Analysts 390 490 25.6 26.15 54,397 4 100
11-9011 Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers 250 290 16.0 N/A N/A 4 40
29-1051 Pharmacists 120 150 25.0 62.50 129,999 1 30
25-2022 Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education 250 280 12.0 2 52,617 5 30
13-2011 Accountants and Auditors 260 290 11.5 28.53 59,351 5 30
13-1073 Training and Development Specialists 120 140 16.7 26.92 56,008 5 20
25-2012 Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education 120 140 16.7 2 55,222 5 20
11-9151 Social and Community Service Managers 130 150 15.4 27.30 56,777 5 20
25-2041 Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School 140 160 14.3 2 56,893 5 20
11-9111 Medical and Health Services Managers 160 180 12.5 40.02 83,237 4 20
21-1023 Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers 160 180 12.5 18.44 38,353 3 20
21-1021 Child, Family, and School Social Workers 170 190 11.8 17.61 36,620 5 20
39-9032 Recreation Workers 230 250 8.7 22.68 47,167 5 20

32
2006-2016 Fastest Growing OccupationsNorth
Valley Region (Colusa, Glenn, and Tehama
Counties)
SOC Code Occupational Title Annual Average Employment Annual Average Employment Percent Change Wages and Training Wages and Training Wages and Training  
SOC Code Occupational Title 2006 2016 Percent Change Median Hourly 1 Median Annual 1 Education Training Levels 3 net change
25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education 860 1,060 23.3 2 53,591 5 200
25-2022 Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education 380 450 18.4 2 56,134 5 70
25-2031 Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education 400 460 15.0 N/A 41,573 5 60
25-2011 Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education 280 330 17.9 10.16 21,135 7 50
11-9011 Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers 660 700 6.1 N/A N/A 4 40
25-2012 Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education 130 160 23.1 2 53,899 5 30
21-1012 Educational, Vocational, and School Counselors 90 110 22.2 17.94 37,296 3 20
29-1127 Speech-Language Pathologists 90 110 22.2 30.14 62,687 3 20
11-9032 Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School 160 180 12.5 N/A 86,837 4 20
39-9032 Recreation Workers 80 90 12.5 9.11 18,957 5 10
29-1051 Pharmacists 90 100 11.1 56.11 116,709 1 10
19-3031 Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists 100 110 10.0 35.81 74,470 2 10
13-2011 Accountants and Auditors 150 160 6.7 27.16 56,490 5 10
33
3. How has RRWS supported the mission and WASC
themes of the university?
  • After the prioritization snapshot, we received
    144,000 for a USDA Multicultural Scholars grant
    (majors in forestry, range, soils).

Picture taken August 18, 2009 of new scholars,
mentors, HSU faculty and staff and U.S. Forest
Service partners.
34
3. Range and Soil Science Agriculture
  • Foregoing this degree will severely curtail
    agriculturally-related classes at HSU and
    potential funding sources (e.g. newly formed USDA
    National Institute of Food and Agriculture).
  • How many of you have read Animal, Vegetable,
    Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver or The Omnivores
    Dilemma by Michael Pollan?
  • Locavore living and interest in regional
    production of a safe , sustainable and healthy
    food supply is very popular and will increase
    enrollment.
  • College of the Redwoods is in the process of
    hiring new faculty to enhance their Agriculture
    program.

35
4. A reasonable proposal
  • Since the 2007-2008 prioritization snapshot RRWS
    has increased in
  • Majors (up 60)
  • Upper Division course enrollments (up 75 RRS, up
    32 SOIL)
  • Student Credit Units (up 20)
  • Full Time Equivalent Students (up 20)
  • Student Faculty Ratio (steady upward trend)
  • Graduates (projected upwards)

36
4. A reasonable proposal
  • Given that
  • There are pending RRWS grant proposals totaling
    more than 300,000 for HSU,
  • HSU is the only choice for California students to
    get a B.S. in Rangeland Resources Science,
  • HSU is one of few places for California student
    to take sufficient courses in Soil Science, and
    that
  • Employment is high for both options (gt90)

37
4. A reasonable proposal
  • We ask that you allow us to
  • Implement proposed curriculum changes and course
    change proposals (to make program more efficient)
  • Postpone elimination for a four year evaluation
    period following acceptance of new curriculum
    (to continue upward trends in enrollment and
    graduate rates).
  • We have successfully recruited community
    lecturers to assist with upper division classes.
  • Our trends, as opposed to the 7 year average
    used in prioritization, are on an upward
    trajectory.

38
Lest we forget
  • Some HSU Vision Statements
  • RRWS Relevance
  • Humboldt State University will be the campus of
    choice for individuals who seek above all else to
    improve the human condition and our environment.
  • We will be the premier center for the
    interdisciplinary study of the environment and
    its natural resources.
  • We will be renowned for social and environmental
    responsibility and action.
  • We will commit to increasing our diversity of
    people and perspectives.
  • We will be exemplary partners with our
    communities, including tribal nations.
  • Its the only choice - the only range major and
    one of the few soils programs in California.
  • Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils are
    integral to all terrestrial ecosystems.
  • We teach for sustainable ecosystem services.
  • We are already successful in recruiting and
    supporting diverse students.
  • We are serving natural resources employment
    needs of agencies, NGOs, consulting firms,
    private landowners and tribal nations in
    California and the west.

39
The last word
  • Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 5, 2009
  • The bigger issue is that most colleges are too
    concerned with trying to compete for prestige
    rather than serve their students and their
    communities, said Cal State's chancellor, Charles
    B. Reed. He and Arizona State University's
    president, Michael M. Crow, spoke on a panel at
    the "Smart Leadership in Difficult Times" forum,
    sponsored by the TIAA-CREF Institute.
  • "Public higher education has done it to itself
    with generic state institutions" that all try to
    do the same thing, Mr. Crow told the gathering of
    130-plus college presidents and other leaders.
    The duplication of expenses among so many
    colleges that are "insufficiently differentiated"
    adds to states' costs and leaves legislators and
    other potential supporters with little
    inspiration to support colleges when they come
    looking for money, said Mr. Crow.
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