I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6ba347-Zjg0Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate.

Description:

I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. It is my daily mood that ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:33
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 21
Provided by: HISD86
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate.


1
I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am
the decisive element in the classroom. It is my
personal approach that creates the climate. It
is my daily mood that makes the weather. As a
teacher I possess tremendous power to make a
child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a
tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration.
I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all
situations, it is my response that decides
whether a crisis will be escalated or
de-escalated, and a child humanized or
de-humanized. ? Haim Ginott, Between
Teacher and Child
2
Think/Pair/Share Describe a teacher who made
the weather in your classroom.
3
Managing the Classroom Effectively
  • PDS/ABRAZO
  • Social Studies
  • Professional
  • Learning Community

ABRAZO
New Teacher Induction
Presented by Gwen Tompkins Shelly Sampson Mintha
Brown Full-Time Mentors, PDS/ABRAZO
4
To manage the group effectively
  • Assume nothing.
  • Tell them where they are headed.
  • Set the tone in the first 5 minutes.
  • Make instructions clear.
  • Build rapport.
  • Catch them doing the right thing.
  • Make your seating support learning.

5
Assume nothing.
  • Our students have 8 teachers with
  • ? different expectations
  • ? different styles
  • ? different tolerance levels.
  • Figure out what you expect.
  • Visualize possible problems.
  • Explain and model expectations.
  • Be consistent with consequences.
  • Remind often, without rancor.

6
Tell them where they are headed.
Teaching shouldnt be a trust walk.
If you do not know where you are going, every
road will get you nowhere. Henry
Kissinger
  • On the board write objectives, warm-up, agenda,
    homework
  • Set purpose verbally.
  • Tap background knowledge.

7
Set the tone in the first 5 minutes.
Living a life is like constructing a building
if you start wrong, you'll end wrong. ?
Maya Angelou
  • Greet students at the door.
  • Post a clearly worded warm-up.
  • Teach procedures for getting materials and
    beginning work.
  • Check work within a few minutes.
  • Take roll using seating chart.

8
Make instructions clear.
  • Instructions can be very confusing for
  • ? Students who struggle with reading
  • ? English language learners
  • ? Kinesthetic learners
  • Make sure theyre listening.
  • Break instructions down into steps.
  • Say it, write it, AND show it.
  • Create an exemplar.
  • Model first.
  • Make sure students understand.

9
Build rapport.
  • If a teacher has a good relationship with
    students, then students more readily accept the
    rules and procedures and the disciplinary actions
    that follow their violations.
  • ? R. Marzano
  • Get to know your students.
  • Listen.
  • Give the benefit of the doubt.
  • Show that you care.
  • Follow the Golden Rule.

10
Catch them doing the right thing.
The more appreciation you show for students doing
the RIGHT thing the less time you will spend
telling them theyre doing the wrong thing.
  • Quietly say, Thank you for
  • Randomly reward behavior.
  • Celebrate individual successes.

11
Make your seating support learning.
Bulletin Board
Chalk/White Board
Bulletin Board
Door
Student Folders
Bookcase
File Cabinet
Windows
File Cabinet
Bookcase
Storage cabinet
TD
Computer Center
12
Think about students learning needs.
Chalk/White Board
TD
13
When dealing with individuals
  • Work the room.
  • Prevent disruptions.
  • Intervene with grace.
  • Follow through consistently.

14
Work the room.
Act like a duck on a pond calm and unruffled
on the surface but paddling like crazy
underneath. ? Carole Cummings
  • Show with-it-ness.
  • Check understanding.
  • Keep moving.
  • Ask students to help.
  • Use the clipboard!

15
Step 1 Prevent disruptions.
The difference between the effective and
ineffective teacher is not in what happens after
the disruption has begun. Its in preventing the
problem in the first place. ? Harry Wong
  • The Look
  • Stop Talking
  • Silent Signal
  • Proximity
  • Clipboard

16
Step 2 Intervene with grace.
The most common disciplinary technique is
nagging. The most exhausting disruptions are the
small, common ones. ? Fred Jones
  • Stay calm.
  • Engage student positively.
  • Restate expectations.
  • Conference privately.
  • Move the student.

17
Step 3 Follow through consistently.
The irony of consistency is that the closer you
come to being consistent before you fail, the
worse off you are. ? Fred Jones, Tools for
Teaching
  • Document, document.
  • Assign consequences.
  • Consult.
  • Call home.
  • Conduct a conference.

18
  • One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant
    teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched
    our human feeling. Curriculum is necessary raw
    material, but warmth is the vital element for the
    growing plant and for the soul of the child.
  • ? Carl Jung, Swiss psychologist

19
Resources
  • Cummings, Carol (2001). Teacher Training
    Classroom Management to Win Students Over- Not
    Win Over Them (2nd Ed) (2 videotapes). Sandy,
    UT TeachStream/Video Journal of Education.
  • DePaul, A. (1998). What to Expect Your First
    Year of Teaching. U.S. Dept. of Ed.
  • Education World, Inc. (1996-2007). Education
    World The Educators Best Friend (website at
    www.education-world.com)
  • Ginott, Haim (1975). Teacher and Child. New
    York, NY Avon Books.
  • Jones, Fred (2000). Tools for Teaching. Santa
    Cruz, CA Frederic H. Jones Associates.

20
Resources (cont.)
  • Marzano, Robert J., Debra Pickering and Jane E.
    Pollock (2001). Classroom Instruction that
    Works. Alexandria, Virginia McREL.
  • Pitonyak, C. (2004). In Our Hands Rethinking
    Classroom Discipline. (PowerPoint presentation
    available at http//www.wm.edu/ttac/esd/rethinki
    ng_classroom_discipline.ppt256,1,In Our Hands
    Rethinking Classroom Discipline). Radford, VA
    Radford University.
  • Wong, Harry K. and Rosemary T. Wong (2001). The
    First Days of School. Mountain View, CA Wong
    Publications.
About PowerShow.com