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Honors U.S. History

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Title: Honors U.S. History


1
Honors U.S. History
  • Review For End Of Course Exam
  • 2013 - 2014
  • Mr. Irwin

2
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • What evidence is there that John Lockes book,
    Two Treatises of Government (1691), greatly
    influenced the the thinking of English colonists
    of North America in the 1700s?
  • SGQ 1

3
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • John Locke Was an Enlightenment Era philosopher
    who proposed that there is a social contract
    which exists between the governed and their
    government, and that people allow themselves to
    be governed.
  • He also wrote that men have certain God-given,
    natural, or unalienable rights, which no king
    can take away.
  • SGQ 1

4
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • What were the Articles of Confederation?
  • Under what conditions were they adopted?
  • What were some strengths weaknesses of the
    Articles?
  • SGQ 2

5
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • After the Declaration of Independence, and during
    the Revolutionary War, the Americans created
    their first loosely organized government, The
    Articles of Confederation.
  • In 1777, while the Revolutionary War was in
    progress, The Articles of Confederation were
    presented to the individual states for
    ratification.
  • The Articles of Confederation gave the new
    national government of the U.S. limited powers
    over the original 13 states.
  • SGQ 2

6
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • Under the Articles of Confederation, a unicameral
    legislature was used for simplicity.
  • There was no executive branch of government.
  • There was no federal court system.
  • Americas unicameral congress would settle
    disputes between states.
  • SGQ 2

7
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
  • Most government power resided in the individual
    states.
  • Congress did not have the power to levy taxes or
    raise money by collecting taxes.
  • SGQ 2

8
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
  • Congress would have to borrow, in order to raise
    money.
  • Congress had no power to regulate trade.
  • Congress did not have the power to to force the
    states to comply with its directives.
  • Laws proposed by Congress needed the approval of
    9 of the 13 states in order to pass a law.
  • SGQ 2

9
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • The Constitutional Convention (1787)
  • After winning the Revolutionary War, the
    Americans sought to strengthen the government of
    the U.S.
  • The Constitutional Convention produced the
    constitution that we know of today.
  • SGQ 3

10
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • The Constitutional Convention (1787)
  • An important debate that took place at the
    constitutional convention was whether or not each
    state should be represented equally in congress,
    or on the other hand, should the new government
    use a system of proportional representation?
  • SGQ 3

11
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • The Knights of Labor - Founded in 1869
  • Sought to become a broad-based voice of labor
  • Welcomed skilled laborers, as well as unskilled,
    semi-skilled laborers.
  • Welcomed women workers, as well as immigrant
    workers
  • SGQ 4

12
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • The Knights of Labor - Idealistically proposed
    that some day, collectives could be formed
    whereby laborers would own factories instead of
    wealthy industrialists.
  • Viewed labor strikes as short term solutions to
  • long-term problems.
  • Associated with Chicagos Haymarket Riot of 1886.
  • SGQ 4

13
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • Which major labor strike of the 1800s involved
    over 100,000 demonstrators demanding an
    eight-hour day?
  • SGQ 5

14
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Haymarket Riot - Chicago - May 1, 1886
  • A demonstration organized by the Knights of Labor
    in which 100,000 workers turned out to protest
    against police violence which which broke out
    during a labor strike over the demand for an
    8-hour work day.
  • Anarchists threw a bomb into the crowd which
    killed 7 people.
  • After the Haymarket Riot, membership in the
    Knights of Labor began to dwindle.
  • SGQ 5

15
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Homestead Strike - July 1892
  • Carnegie Steel Corporations president, Henry
    Frick, attempted to force a pay cut upon steel
    workers at Carnegies Homestead, Pennsylvania
    factory.
  • AFL union workers refused to take a pay cut.
  • Violence broke out between the striking workers
    and the private security force (the Pinkerton
    Agency) that Frick had hired to keep the striking
    workers out of the factory.
  • SGQ 5

16
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Homestead Strike - July 1892
  • The strike went on for 5 months.
  • State Troopers eventually intervened
  • The strikers eventually gave in
  • Public opinion for the union turned against the
    union as the result of this long violent
    strike.
  • SGQ 5

17
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Pullman Strike - 1894
  • Took place at the Pullman Railroad Car Company
    near Chicago.
  • Workers went on strike to protest exploitive
    practices of company owner, George Pullman.
  • American Railway workers went on strike.
  • President Grover Cleveland ordered federal troops
    to protect interstate commerce and the
    continuation of U.S. mail delivery.
  • SGQ 5

18
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Pullman Strike - 1894
  • Union Leader Eugene V. Debs was jailed.
  • Workers gave in to management and went back to
    work.
  • Debs filed a lawsuit against his
    imprisonment, but the U.S. Supreme Court upheld
    the governments position that it was defending
    interstate commerce by sending in federal troops.
  • SGQ 5

19
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Frederick Taylor
  • A foreman factory engineer who pioneered the
    concept of approaching factory production in a
    systematic manner in order to increase
    productivity while lowering manufacturing costs
    by eliminating waste.
  • The phrase Time Is Money can be succinctly used
    to describe his approach to manufacturing, which
    became known as Scientific Management.
  • SGQ 6

20
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • From your study guide
  • Be able to match the following industrialists
    with the industry in which they were involved
  • J.P. Morgan
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt
  • Andrew Carnegie
  • John D. Rockefeller
  • SGQ7

21
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Andrew Carnegie
  • Founded Carnegie Steel
  • Built his industrial empire primarily as the
    result of Vertical Consolidation.
  • SGQ 7

22
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • J.P. Morgan
  • Made his first fortune in banking finance.
  • Put an investment group together to purchase
    Carnegie Steel Corporation.
  • This purchase became the largest financial
    transaction in U.S. history up to that time.
  • Morgan named his new steel company, U.S. Steel
    Corporation.
  • SGQ 7

23
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt
  • Big Business Railroad Giant of the late 1880s.
  • Grew his business through horizontal
    consolidation.
  • SGQ 7

24
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • John D. Rockefeller
  • Founded The Standard Oil Corporation.
  • Built his empire initially, through the concept
    of Horizontal Consolidation.
  • SGQ 7

25
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Robber Barons or Captains of Industry?
  • Historians have used the above terms, to describe
    the key industrialists of the Era of Big
    Business.
  • The use of these terms is based on ones own
    perspective.
  • SGQ 7

26
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Robber Barons or Captains of Industry?
  • Robber baron - implies that business leaders
    built their fortunes by taking advantage of
    and/or stealing from labor and the public.
  • Captains of Industry - suggests that business
    leaders created new products markets, which in
    turn, created jobs that benefited the country, as
    well as the general public.
  • SGQ 8

27
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Political Machines
  • During the later 1800s - early 1900s, major
    cities such as New York Boston, were controlled
    by Political Machines.
  • Political machines grew out of the confusion
    surrounding rapid urban growth and the influx of
    immigrants that major cities experienced during
    the above period.
  • The goals of the Political Machines were to gain
    power money by influencing government elections
    the awards of lucrative contracts.
  • SGQ 9

28
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Political Machines
  • High profile Political Bosses referenced in this
    class have been
  • Big Tim Sullivan (Tammany Hall, New York)
  • William Marcy Boss Tweed (New York)
  • Tom Pendergast (Missouri)
  • SGQ 9

29
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Political Machines
  • Since Political Machines were not really a part
    of the legitimate political system, what is the
    explanation for their existence success?
  • Political Machines used a pyramid approach to
    controlling local neighborhoods voting
    districts, with the big boss at the very top,
    and layers of Lieutenants in the middle, and
    foot-soldiers at the bottom.
  • SGQ 10

30
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Political Machines
  • Political machines helped low income people get
    jobs, who in turn became loyal to the machine.
  • Political machines helped elect corrupt
    politicians, who once elected, were indebted to
    the machine.
  • This way of operating enabled the perpetuation of
    political machines.
  • SGQ 10

31
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • List several problems that cities faced as the
    result of industrial development and large
    numbers of immigrants who flooded Americas major
    industrial cities during the late 1800s - 1900s.
  • SGQ 11

32
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Problems that cities faced as the result of
    industrial development and large scale
    immigration during mid-1800s to early-1900s.
  • Not enough public utilities such as water
    sewage in place.
  • shortage of housing
  • slums tenements
  • poverty crime
  • SGQ 11

33
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Plessy v. Ferguson - 1883
  • Relates to segregation.
  • The case was brought to the U.S. Supreme Court as
    the result of perceived discrimination on
    railroad cars.
  • Established the principle of Separate but
    Equal.
  • SGQ 12

34
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Grange
  • Officially known as the Patrons of Husbandry.
  • A cooperative established in 1866 to enable
    farmers to pool their money so that they could
    buy goods in quantity at lower prices.
  • Once established, the Grange put pressure on
    state legislators to regulate businesses, such as
    railroads, and grain elevators, that the farmers
    depended on for their livelihood.
  • SGQ 13

35
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • In Mr. Irwins Honors U.S. History class,
    students have had the opportunity to learn that
    muckrakers sought reform in the following areas
  • child labor
  • the meat processing industry
  • government politics
  • The business practices of monopolies, such as the
    Standard Oil Company, others
  • SGQ 14 15

36
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Muckrakers
  • Upton Sinclairs Novel - The Jungle
  • Sinclairs book results in reform.
  • President Theodore Roosevelt read Sinclairs book
    and wrote to Mr. Sinclair that
  • the specific evils you point out shall, if
    their existence be proved, and if I have power,
    be eradicated.
  • President worked with Congress to get the Meat
    Inspection Act of 1906 passed.
  • SGQ 16

37
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Monroe Doctrine - Relates to U.S. foreign
    policy.
  • Comes from a speech given to the U.S. Congress by
    President James Monroe in 1823.
  • 1. The U.S. wound not get involved in the
    internal affairs of European countries nor take
    sides in any war among them.
  • 2. America recognized the existing colonies and
    states in the Western Hemisphere and would not
    interfere with them.
  • 3. America would not permit further colonization
    of the Western Hemisphere.
  • 4. America would view any attempt by a European
    power to control any nation in the Western
    Hemisphere as a hostile action.
  • SGQ 18

38
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Roosevelt Corollary- Relates to U.S. foreign
    policy.
  • Comes from a speech given to the U.S. Congress by
    President Theodore Roosevelt in 1904.
  • Corollary means an addition or an extension.
  • It is considered an extension of the Monroe
    Doctrine.
  • 1. Roosevelt stated that the U.S. did not intend
    to use the Monroe Doctrine as a cloak for
    territory aggression/expansion.
  • 2. The U.S. sought peace with the world and with
    the other peoples of the American continent.
  • 3. Actions of other countries could force the
    U.S. to take action, but should this happen, the
    overall goal of the U.S. would not be that of
    territorial aggression/expansion.
  • SGQ 18

39
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Progressive Movement - 1895 - 1920
  • Nationwide movement to reform American government
    under the following goals
  • 1. Government should be more accountable to its
    citizens.
  • 2. Government should curb the power and
    influence of wealthy interests.
  • 3. Government should be given expanded powers so
    that it could become more active in improving the
    lives of its citizens.
  • 4. Government should become more efficient and
    less corrupt so that they could competently
    handle an expanded role.
  • SGQ 19

40
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Progressive Movement - 1895 - 1920
  • Nationwide movement to reform American
    government
  • Like the Populists before them, the Progressives
    sought to reform America.
  • There was some overlap of issues with the
    Populists Progressives.
  • By and large, the primary focus of the
    Progressives was urban in nature. The Populists
    focus was more on rural/agrarian issues.
  • SGQ 19

41
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Progressive Movement - 1895 - 1920
  • Progressive Presidents
  • Theodore Roosevelt 1901 - 1909
  • William Howard Taft - 1909 - 1913
  • Woodrow Wilson - 1913 - 1921
  • SGQ 19

42
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Progressive Movement - 1895 - 1920
  • Some Examples of Progressive Era Reform
  • Settlement House Movement
  • Housing Sanitation Reforms
  • Antitrust Legislation
  • Factory Safety Regulations
  • Limited Working Hours For Women
  • Child Labor Laws
  • SGQ 19

43
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • The Progressive Movement - 1895 - 1920
  • Progressive Reform Relating to Elections
    Elected Officials
  • Initiative - Process by which voters can place an
    issue directly on voting ballots.
  • Referendum - A process that allows citizens to
    approve or reject a law passed by the
    legislature.
  • Recall - A procedure which permits voters to
    remove public officials from office before their
    term is up.
  • SGQ 20

44
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Question What Was Yellow Journalism?
  • Answer Sensationalistic journalism covering
    lurid details of murders, vice, and scandal, etc.
  • Question Why Yellow Journalism?
  • Answer The goal was to sell more newspapers
    /or magazines in the highly competitive
    industry.
  • Most well Known Yellow Journalists
  • William Randolph Hearst
  • Joseph Pulitzer
  • SGQ 23

45
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Question
  • What was the U.S. attempting to accomplish as
    the result of its expansion beyond geographical
    borders during the late 1800s - early 1900s?
  • SGQ 24

46
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Question
  • What was the U.S. attempting to accomplish as
    the result of its expansion beyond geographical
    borders during the late 1800s - early 1900s?
  • Answer
  • Develop strategic military bases refueling
    stations for the U.S. Navy.
  • Obtain raw material natural resources.
  • Open new markets for American products.
  • SGQ 24

47
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Question
  • What impact did disease have on the
  • Spanish-American War?
  • SGQ 27

48
End of Course Review - Part 1
  • Question
  • What impact did disease have on the
    Spanish-American War?
  • Answer
  • Disease killed more soldiers than combat in the
    war, itself.
  • SGQ 27

49
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • U.S. Foreign Policy 1930s - 1950s
  • Good Neighbor Policy
  • Big Stick Policy
  • Truman Doctrine
  • SGQ 47, 53, 54

50
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • U.S. Foreign Policy 1930s - 1950s
  • Good Neighbor Policy - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • The U.S. will respect its rights and the
    rights of its neighbors of the Western
    Hemisphere.
  • Big Stick Policy - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • speak softly and carry a big stick.
  • Truman Doctrine - Harry S. Truman
  • The U.S. will support free peoples who attempt
    to resist Soviet domination.
  • SGQ 47, 53, 54

51
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • What was the Atlantic Charter?
  • SGQ 48

52
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The Atlantic Charter
  • August, 1941- Churchill Roosevelt meet in
    Secret to establish a set of common war aims.
  • Collective Security
  • Disarmament of Germany
  • Economic Cooperation
  • Freedom of the Seas
  • SGQ 48

53
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Question
  • During World War II
  • What was the purpose of the Allies island
    hopping strategy?
  • SGQ 49

54
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Island Hopping Strategy
  • Answer
  • The island hopping strategy enabled the Allies
    to push the Japanese back, from Pearl Harbor, all
    the way to Okinawa.
  • In doing so, the Allies were able to set up an
    air base in close enough proximity, to enable
    them to carry out bombing raids over major
    Japanese cities.
  • SGQ 49

55
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Question
  • During World War II
  • What was the Manhattan Project?
  • SGQ 50

56
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Answer
  • The Manhattan Project was a 2 billion secret
    effort to build an atomic bomb.
  • Refugee scientists from Nazi Germany were
    instrumental in the American effort to develop
    the bomb.
  • SGQ 50

57
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • What do you know about the U.S. governments
    policy of internment of Japanese Americans during
    World War?
  • SGQ 52

58
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Korematsu v. United States
  • The Constitutionality of U.S. internment of
    Japanese- Americans was challenged in the Supreme
    Court case of Korematsu v. United States.
  • The court ruled that during time of war, the
    government can restrict rights and privileges, in
    order to protect the security of the nation.
  • SGQ 52

59
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Question
  • What do you know about the formation of NATO?
  • SGQ 55

60
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Answer
  • NATO stands for North Atlantic Treaty
    Organization.
  • In 1949, twelve nations signed a mutual defense
    treaty in order to offset any threat that might
    be posed by the Soviet Union.
  • Although made up primarily of European nations,
    the United States and Canada joined the alliance.
  • SGQ 55

61
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The Korean War
  • With Japan out of Korea, and World War II over,
    Korea had been partitioned at the 38th Parallel.
  • A communist government (oddly) called the
    Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea was
    established in Northern Korea.
  • and
  • A democratic government called the Republic of
    Korea was established in Southern Korea.
  • SGQ 56, 57

62
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The Korean War
  • In June 1950, a North Korean military force
    crossed the 38th parallel and invaded South
    Korea.
  • Using Cold War thinking, the U.S. entered what
    some believed to be a Korean civil war.
  • Led by General Douglas MacArthur, American
    soldiers helped drive the communists back above
    the 38th parallel.
  • In doing so, the U.S. was supporting the South
    Korean government of Syngman Rhee.
  • SGQ 56, 57

63
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The Korean War
  • After three years of fighting, the war ended in a
    stalemate.
  • In 1953, an armistice was signed, in which it was
    agreed that the communists would occupy territory
    north of the 38th parallel and the democratic
    Koreans would occupy territory south of the 38th
    parallel
  • and that a demilitarized zone would separate
    North Korea from South Korea.
  • SGQ 56, 57

64
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Question
  • What do you know about the 1954 Geneva Accords?
  • SGQ 58

65
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Vietnam
  • The 1954 Geneva Accords relate to Vietnam.
  • After a nationalistic Vietnamese movement
    defeated the French in Vietnam, and ended French
    colonial rule
  • The Geneva Accords were signed by France, by
    Ho Chi Minh, of North Vietnam, and by Bao Dai, of
    South Vietnam.
  • The accords spelled out what the political
    makeup of Vietnam was to be for the next several
    years.
  • SGQ 58

66
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Vietnam
  • According to the Geneva Accords of 1954
  • The communist regime of Ho Chi Minh would occupy
    territory North of the 17th parallel.
  • The U.S. supported democratic government of Bao
    Dai would occupy territory South of the 17th
    parallel.
  • Free elections for a future unified Vietnam were
    to be held in 1956.
  • SGQ 58

67
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Vietnam
  • In 1956, when it was time for free
    elections, it seemed like
  • Ho Chi Minh, the communist leader of North
    Vietnam would
  • win by an overwhelming margin
  • Not wanting South Vietnam to become
    communistic,
  • U.S. President Eisenhower and South Vietnamese
    leader, Dai, would not
  • allow the people of South Vietnam to
    participate in the elections.
  • In the 1960s, the U.S. would send military
    personnel,
  • first as advisers to the government of South
    Vietnam
  • ...,And later to fight the communists
    from the North.
  • SGQ 74

68
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • G.I. Bill of Rights
  • Purpose
  • To show gratitude to military service personnel.
  • Designed to allow returning servicemen to
    gradually be absorbed into the U.S. workforce.
  • Included year-long unemployment benefits.
  • Government paid college living expenses
  • Low interest government home loans
  • SGQ 51

69
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • From your study guide

70
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • African Americans in Vietnam
  • At the time of the Vietnam War, men of military
    service age were subject to a draft if not
    attending college, or otherwise exempt.
  • Once in Vietnam, many African American draftees
    began to feel that they were fighting another
    countrys civil war, while their own civil war
    (the Civil Rights Movement), was being waged at
    home, without their presence.
  • SGQ 69

71
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • U.S. Presidential Policy on the Containment of
    Communism
  • Beginning with the Truman Doctrine, issued in
    1947,
  • the following four consecutive U.S. presidents
    maintained foreign
  • policy that was based upon the containment of
    communism.
  • Harry S. Truman
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • John F. Kennedy
  • Lyndon B. Johnson
  • SGQ 67

72
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Affirmative Action and the Bakke Decision of 1978
  • In an effort to allow for more diversity and to
    give
  • equal opportunities to minorities, the U.S.
    government
  • adopted the policy of affirmative action.
  • Government agencies, public colleges and
    universities
  • responded by establishing quotas designed to
    insure that
  • a certain percentage of minorities were
    guaranteed to get
  • jobs, or to be accepted into college.
  • SGQ 72

73
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Affirmative Action and the Bakke Decision of
    1978
  • In the case of Regents of the University of
    California v. Bakke
  • Mr. Bakke, a white male with a strong academic
    record,
  • was denied admission to U.C. Davis, while a
    number
  • of minority students with lesser accomplishments
  • were admitted.
  • Mr. Bakke sued the university, claiming that
    denying
  • him admission, while allowing minority students
    to be
  • admitted, based on a lower standard for them,
    was
  • unfair treatment.
  • SGQ 72

74
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Affirmative Action and the Bakke Decision of 1978
  • The Supreme Court, in a 5-4 split decision ruled
    that
  • it was permissible to consider race as a factor
    for admission
  • to a public college or university.
  • As the result of this decision, public colleges
    and
  • universities continued the practice of
    establishing quotas
  • to fill for the admission of minority students.
  • SGQ 72

75
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • 1972 1982
  • The Push For An Equal Rights Amendment
  • During this timeframe, a nationwide womens
    movement
  • gained momentum.
  • Among other things, women demanded
  • equal pay for equal work.
  • SGQ 73

76
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • 1972 1982
  • The Push For An Equal Rights Amendment
  • Ultimately, a bill in Congress that would
    establish an
  • Amendment to the U.S. Constitution failed to
    pass.
  • Even though the bill failed, much of America
    respond to
  • the issues that the ERA was based upon.
  • SGQ 73

77
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The U.S. Secretly Expands The Vietnam War Into
    Cambodia
  • By entering Cambodia, the U.S. was attempting to
  • cut off supply routes to the North Vietnamese
    communists.
  • When word of this expansion of the war was
  • received back in the U.S., it fueled more intense
  • anti-war demonstrations.
  • SGQ 75

78
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • As President, Jimmy Carter is unable to control
    inflation
  • During the Carter administration, inflation
    exceeded 13.
  • Inflation is a condition in which wages fail to
    keep up with the ever increasing cost of the
    items that consumers purchase.
  • An inflation rate of 13 means that a dollar can
    only buy 87
  • of the goods that it used to be able to purchase.
  • SGQ 77

79
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • President Ronald Reagan implements
  • supply-side economics.
  • Supply side economics is based upon the principle
    that
  • tax cuts will stimulate the economy.
  • Opponents of this economic policy call it
  • trickle-down economics.
  • Opponents of supply-side economics believe that
    the wealthy
  • are the largest benefactors of this policy.
  • SGQ 78

80
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • Opponents of supply-side economics believe that
  • the wealthy are the largest benefactors of this
    policy
  • that government showers the wealthy with
  • tax incentivesand that a small amount of
    benefit
  • trickles down to the middle and lower class.
  • SGQ 78

81
End of Course Review - Part 2
  • The Reagan Doctrine
  • President Reagan adopts an anti-communist foreign
    policy.
  • He establishes a policy of supporting
  • anti-communist operations anywhere in the world.
  • SGQ 79

82
End of Review
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