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Building a Youth Specific, Youth Driven Transition Program

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Building a Youth Specific, Youth Driven Transition Program Panhandle Independent Living Center 1118 S. Taylor Amarillo, TX 79101 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Building a Youth Specific, Youth Driven Transition Program


1
Building a Youth Specific, Youth Driven
Transition Program
  • Panhandle Independent Living Center
  • 1118 S. Taylor
  • Amarillo, TX 79101

2
(No Transcript)
3
Agenda
  • The 5 Ws of a Youth Program
  • Why should youth have their own program?
  • Who should be our target?
  • What unique needs should it address?

4
  • Where should the youth specific activities take
    place?
  • When should youth be provided with services?

5
  • The How of Developing a Youth Program
  • Recruitment of Youth Participants
  • The Importance of Planning Variety
  • How to Engage Community Support

6
  • Fundraising / Grant Writing
  • Enlistment Role of Volunteers
  • Prepare Parents for Youth Programs
  • Evaluating Our Own Program

7
Overview
  • Suggestions for Building a
  • Successful Program

8
What?
  • What is our YES program?
  • A program developed to assist middle and high
    school youth with disabilities in learning the
    skills and tools necessary to make healthy
    decisions as they approach adulthood.
  • It is designed to meet the unique needs that
    these youth face in their daily lives.

9
  • Our main focus is to give these students a
    positive, educational environment where they can
    learn from each other in a fun environment.

10
  • What our program IS NOT?
  • We are not a day care or day camp program.
  • We are not staffed to provide a full-time daily
    program.
  • We are not the answer to a parents childcare
    needs.
  • We are not equipped to offer transportation to
    and from our ILC.

11
Why?
  • Why does PILC offer a youth program?
  • Independent Living Centers staff are dedicated
    to providing education, information, and positive
    environment that empowers people with
    disabilities to make positive life choices on
    their own behalf.
  • We believe this is best done at a younger age
    before complacency and dependency has set in and
    become a way of life.

12
Who?
  • Who does PILC serve in our transitional program?
  • Our youth participants range in age from 12 to
    21. They must also be a student in middle or
    high school.
  • Students are allowed to remain in our program for
    one last summer of activities following their
    graduation from high school.

13
  • They then enter our adult program, if they
    choose, which allows
  • them interaction with their older peers,
  • them to share their YES experiences with the
    older consumers as a source of true peer
    support/peer counseling
  • the staff to open YES enrollment to additional
    youth.

14
When?
  • When do we offer our after school program?
  • YES meets the first and third Monday of each
    month from 430-600 p.m.
  • This allows the youth time to get from school to
    our center, enjoy an after school snack, and
    engage in regular IL skills training, empowerment
    activities, and social and recreational events.

15
  • YES also meets each Monday and Wednesday during
    an 10-week extensive summer program.
  • This schedule allows for our rural county
    students to access our Panhandle Transit system,
    which only has routes to Amarillo on these days.
  • The students receive 4 hours of
    services/activities each of the two days.

16
  • It allows for equal calendar time between our
    youth and adult programs, which means that adult
    services are not interfered with during the
    summer months.
  • YES provides activities during special school
    breaks such as Spring Break to ensure the
    students do not become isolated during the
    extended school holiday.

17
Where?
  • Where should this youth specific activities take
    place?
  • Your ILC provides a perfect location because
  • ILC core services provide valuable skills
    training and opportunities at a young age.
  • The IL philosophy, the history, and culture of
    the disability community are valuable lessons for
    any person with a disability.

18
  • Your staff and board members provide an excellent
    source for positive role models who exemplify the
    lifestyles of independent individuals who have
    overcome their own obstacles and have learned how
    to work around or limit the impact of their own
    limitations.

19
  • The HOW of Successful
  • Program Development

20
Recruitment of Youth Participants
  • Establish eligibility and intake requirements
  • Identify appropriate allied agencies for referral
    purposes
  • Utilize assessments properly to gain valuable
    information

21
Plan Carefully / Provide Variety
  • Allow youth an opportunity to plan with staff.
  • Early exercise in consumer control consumer
    directed philosophy
  • Reinforces empowerment skills
  • Provides an exercise in decision-making

22
  • Plan a variety of activities that provide
    practice and discussion with essential skills
  • Use hands-on activities and real world
    applications
  • Utilize the ILC 4 core services
  • IL Skills Training Cooking, Money Management
    Skills, etc.

23
  • Peer Counseling provide group discussions on an
    area of need or interest (example overcoming
    obstacles or improving your self-esteem)
  • Advocacy
  • Instruct students on becoming their own self
    advocate by teaching them techniques to become
    assertive on their own behalf
  • Assisting parents to become a powerful, positive
    advocate for their child and their needs.

24
  • Information Referrals provide resources for a
    multitude of consumer needs including
  • Transportation
  • Employment
  • Mobility Assistance
  • Housing
  • Medical Programs
  • Adaptive Equipment
  • Emergency food

25
  • Avoid getting in a rut
  • Make each and every day different
  • Keep the youth guessing
  • Allow free socialization time for youth
  • Provide unstructured times for visiting to
    encourage the natural building of relationships
  • Lunch Time
  • Outside Activities
  • Board Games

26
  • Avoid the classroom feel
  • Ensure all activities are educational and FUN!
  • Educational Field Trips
  • Motivational Guest Speakers
  • Role Playing
  • Building Effective Communication Skills
  • Empowerment Activities
  • Team Building Exercises
  • Positive Peer Role Models

27
Engage Community Support
  • Network with business leaders and community
    organizations
  • Do not be afraid to beg for reduced rates
    and/or freebies
  • Most approached are willing to assist with most
    anything a program needs when it is aimed at
    assisting youth

28
  • Always say, Thank You.
  • Ensure that all contributors, speakers,
    donations, etc. receive a hand written thank you
    note signed by all youth participants
  • They will remember you next year because of this
    simple common courtesy.

29
Fundraising / Grant Writing
  • Consider asking local business and charitable
    organizations for start up money
  • Provide them PR by placing their company logo on
    the back of t-shirts, which is then worn on all
    field trips
  • Find long-term funding to ensure longevity of the
    program

30
  • Utilize your funding to provide a completely free
    program since the majority of these youth come
    from low-income families. Ensure that there are
    NO
  • Registration Fees / Application Fees
  • Admissions fees for field trip expenses
  • Lunch expenses on outings outside your ILC

31
Enlistment Role of Volunteers
  • Enlist as much free hands-on help as possible
  • Recruit individuals with and without disabilities
  • Consider high school age volunteers/mentors

32
  • Ensure mentors and volunteers have positive
    characteristics / comfort level with disabilities

33
Preparing Parents
  • Avoid problems early
  • Prepare parents before program begins
  • Ensure they understand the purpose and mission of
    the program
  • Independence is taught, encouraged, and
    practiced.
  • NOT day care or camp

34
  • Invite parents to communicate their suggestions
    for activities and material to be taught

35
  • Consider implementing a parent support group
  • Provides parents with their own guidance and peer
    support as their children begin to exercise their
    independence.
  • Vital step to encouraging parents allow their
    children to practice the skills taught within
    your program

36
Evaluation Procedure
  • Provide youth, parents, and community and
    opportunity to provide you written feedback
    regarding the program itself and the activities
    provided.
  • Provide surveys before and during the program
  • Provide larger assessment to evaluate program at
    the end of each summer

37
Additional Resources
  • Building Youth Mentoring Programs Community
    Toolbox http//ctb.ku.edu/tools/en/sub_section_mai
    n_1197.htm
  • Partners for Youth with Disabilities
    http//www.pyd.org/
  • Foundations of Successful Youth Mentoring A
    Guidebook for Program Development
    http//www.nwrel.org/mentoring/pdf/foundations.pdf

38
  • Building Relationships A Guide for New Mentors
    http//www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/29_publ
    ication.pdf
  • Ten Tips to Mentoring Youth with Disabilities
    http//www.prtaonline.org/PDF20Files/Ten20Tips2
    0to20Mentoring20YWD.pdf
  • Group Work A Counseling Specialty by Samuel T.
    Gladding (4th Edition)
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