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Title: Innovative Educators Academic Advising Symposium Series Training Academic Advisors: Conceptual, Relational, and Informational Issues


1
Innovative Educators Academic Advising Symposium
Series Training Academic Advisors Conceptual,
Relational, and Informational Issues
  • Tom Brown
  • www.tbrownassociates.com
  • tom_at_tbrownassociates.com

2
Academic Advising Symposium Series Innovative
Educators
  • Organizing Delivering Academic Advising Models
    for Success Peggy King
  • Training Academic Advisors
  • Maximizing the Impact of Academic Advising on
    Student Success Wes Habley
  • Assessing the Effectiveness of Your Academic
    Advising Program Tom Grites
  • Its All About Change Negotiating the Culture
    for Effective Advising Wes Habley

3
Maze or Labyrinth? The term labyrinth is
often used interchangeably with maze but a
labyrinth has a clear through-route to a goal
and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.

4
Academic Advisors Lights in the Labyrinth
5
Advising will occur in scheduled sessions, over a
cup of coffee, or on a stroll from one building
to another. Ernest Boyer College, 1987

6
One of the few things we know from learning
theory

7
One of the few things we know from learning
theory
  • We forget most of what we learn!

8
Implementation Guide Action Planning
  1. List the main ideas and strategies from the
    session.
  2. Select an idea to adapt or a strategy to
    implement.
  3. List specific goals and objectives you want to
    achieve.
  4. Who will be your collaborators and how will you
    engage them?

9
Implementation Guide Action Planning
  1. What/who are the main obstacles or antagonists?
    How will you reduce, eliminate, or engage these?
  2. What resources will you use to make the case?
  3. What will be your timeline for implementation?
  4. How will you assess your progress?

10
The biggest and longest lasting reform in
undergraduate education will come when
individuals and small groups adopt the view of
themselves as reformers in their immediate
spheres of influence. K. Patricia Cross
11
Training Academic Advisors Conceptual,
Relational, and Informational Issues
  • Tom Brown
  • www.tbrownassociates.com
  • tom_at_tbrownassociates.com

12
Many key competencies are developed after
educators arrive on campus. Therefore, colleges
must assume the responsibility for teaching and
developing their own educators to enhance student
learning inside and outside the classroom by
providing professional development
programs. Brown Ward, 2007
13
TRIAD FOR STUDENT SUCCESS
Comprehensive Support Programs
High Quality Teaching
Developmental Advising Program
14
DEVELOPMENTAL ACADEMIC ADVISING
Evaluation/ Assessment
Recognition Reward
Advisor Development
15
DEVELOPMENTAL ACADEMIC ADVISING
Evaluation/ Assessment
Recognition Reward
Advisor Development
16
Lowest Ratings for Advising Program
Effectiveness Sixth National Survey on Academic
Advising (2004)
  • 1997 2004
  • 8. Implementing training program for
    advisors 2.7 3.05
  • 9. Evaluating effectiveness of advising
    program 2.63 2.77
  • 10. Evaluating effectiveness of
    advisors 2.68 2.76
  • 11. Rewarding good advisor performance 2.16 2.42
  • 5-Very effective 4-Effective 3-Neutral
  • 2-Ineffective 1-Very Ineffective

17
The majority of institutions do not require
advisor development programs.
Those that do, offer programs at the beginning of
the Fall term for one day or less.
Sixth National Survey on Academic
Advising
18
All too often in the past, advisor training was
seen as a one time event at the beginning of the
school year.
  • Effective advising today requires more extensive,
    on going activities. Virginia
    Gordon Handbook of Academic Advising, 1992

19
Whats needed is a different way of thinking
about professional developmentnot as special
occasions offered on a periodic basis but as an
integral part of institutional work. C
arnegie Foundation, 2008
20
Redefining Advisor Development From events
to a process.
21
Faculty members are left to sink or swim when it
comes to effective student advisingthey are
blamed for something they lack the professional
training to do. Dr. Yolanda Moses President,
AAHE Faculty Advising Examined, 2003
22
Most faculty report having had little or no
training or other preparation prior to beginning
their work in advising.
23
When I first began to advise, I had adequate
preparation and training. (n1570) Strongly
agree/agree 30 Disagree/strongly
disagree 53 Brown Survey of Faculty,
2001-2009
24
Adequate preparation and training?
  • I began getting advising folders in the campus
    mail even before I was actually an advisor. No
    one told me why I was getting them or what to do
    with them. Brown Survey of
    Faculty, 2001-2009

25
Adequate preparation and training?
  • I had no advising preparation at all. I learned
    by trial and error. Brown Survey of
    Faculty, 2001-2009

26
58 of campuses have programs in place for
advisor training. Advising Needs
Report Noel-Levitz, 2006
27
The Principle All individuals engaged in
academic advising should participate in
pre-service and/or in-service development
programs.
28
Advisor Development Programs Objectives
Specific
Meaningful
Achievable
Realistic
Tangible
29
Advisor Development Programs Objectives
Specific
Meaningful
Achievable
Realistic
Tangible
30
Outcomes for Advisor Development
  • Cognitive What advisors should understand
    and know
  • Behavioral What advisors should
  • do
  • Affective What advisors should
  • value and appreciate

31
Factors in planning advisor development programs
  • CONTENT
  • AUDIENCE
  • TECHNIQUES

32
ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Informational
Conceptual
Relational
33
Conceptual Elements
  • Definition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

34
Conceptual Elements
  • ReDefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

35
1960s Definition Academic Advising A task
concentrated during registration and enrollment
that consists mainly of aiding students in the
selection of courses. Handbook of College
Administration Asa Knowles 1965
36
Redefining academic advising From prescriptive
to developmental. From an event to a process.
37
How does XYZ Tech define advising?
  • The advising staff offers support to all XYZ Tech
    students in the selection of the liberal
    education courses required for their
    degrees. XYZ Tech Undergraduate Bulletin
    2006 (pg. 96)

38
How does Local CC define advising?
  • Students meet with academic advisors to choose a
    major, select courses, review degree
    requirements. Local CC 2004-2006 Academic
    Bulletin (Pg. 21)

39
Academic Advising is a systematic process
based on a close advisor student relationship
intended to aid students in achieving their
personal, educational, and career
goals. focuses on helping them acquire skills
and attitudes that promote their intellectual and
personal development. assists students to make
full use of campus and community resources in the
process. Developmental Academic
Advising Winston, Miller, Ender, Grites
Associates. 1984
40
A Mission-based Definition
Consistent with the mission and goals of Ivy Tech
Community College Academic Advising is
committed to engaging students in intentional,
collaborative, supportive, and meaningful
partnerships. Grounded in teaching and
learning, Academic Advising will assist students
in achieving their personal, educational,
cultural, and career goals while becoming
self-directed, life-long learners.
41
A Mission-based Definition
Undergraduate academic advising at the University
of Washington is a core element of the
Universitys focus on student learning. As
educators, advisors partner with faculty and the
campus community to cultivate our students
intellectual development. As guides and
advocates, advisors collaborate with students to
craft a transformative educational experience so
they may become informed, articulate, and
thoughtful students and citizens of the world.
42
Language is a window into our culture and history
and the way we try to think. John M. Morse,
Publisher Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary
43
Advising is more meaningful when treated as a
teaching process rather than a product. Academic
Advising for Student Success A System of
Shared Responsibility Susan Frost. 1991
44
Teaching and advising need to be part of a
seamless process, sharing the same intellectual
sphere, informed by a relatively consistent
educational philosophy.
Robert M. Berdahl, Historian
and President University of California,
Berkeley Teaching
Through Academic Advising A Faculty
Perspective, 1995
45
Shared Goals of Teaching and Advising
  • Increase knowledge
  • Enhance critical thinking abilities
  • Skills acquisition
  • Increase problem solving abilities
  • Integration of learning making connections and
    finding meaning
  • Broaden Perspectives

46
Increase Knowledge
  • Purposes of college and learning
  • About themselves
  • About the worlds in which they live and will live
    their lives

47
Advisors teach students to Value the
learning process Put the college experience
into perspective Core Values National
Academic Advising Assn
48
Enhance Critical Thinking Advisors help students
think through short-term decisions and long-range
plans, which enables students to take charge of
their lives. Empowering Lifelong
Learning Arthur Chickering Fall 1994
NACADA Journal
49
Advisors teach students to make decisions. Core
Values National Academic Advising Assn
50
Skills Acquisition As students frame questions
about the future and seek information needed to
formulate answers, they practice behaviors and
develop skills they will use throughout their
lives. Academic Advising for Student
Success Susan Frost, 1991
51
Problem Solving The fundamental purpose of
academic advising is to help students become
effective agents for their own lifelong learning
and development. Chickering, 1994
52
A goal of education is helping students to think
and solve the problems of life.
53
Integration of learning
54
Integration of Learning Do Students recognize
the value of general education requirements?
(n1555) Strongly agree/agree 21 Disagree/st
rongly disagree 52 Brown Survey,
2001-2009
55
The faculty members students identify as having
had a powerful influence on their thinking and on
their lives are those who helped them make
connections between the curriculum and their
personal lives, values, and experiences.
Richard Light Making the Most of College,
2001
56
Integration of Learning Field of Study
vs. Major
57
Broaden Perspectives
  • Work vs. a J.O.B.
  • Learning vs. grades

58
Broaden Perspectives Students need to understand
that process is important not just getting the
answeror the grade. Faculty Viewpoint
Understanding University Success, 2003
59
Students usually have a realistic understanding
about the demands of academic work and what is
required to be successful in their classes. (n
1587) Strongly agree/agree 13
Disagree/strongly disagree 69 Brown
Survey of Faculty, 2001-2009
60
Do students understand what is required to be
successful in college?
  • I am rolling on the floor!!! Brown
    Survey 2001-2009

61
35 reported A/A- as their average high school
grade.
  • 93 earned a B average or higher.
  • 57 expect to earn at least a B average in
    college. 2008 CIRP Survey
  • Public 4 year Universities

62
Do students understand what is required to be
successful?
  • How many hours did you study during a typical
    week in your last year of high school?
  • 43 Five hours or less
  • 36 Less than two hours a week!!
    2008 CIRP Survey

63
How much time did community college students
spend preparing for class?
  • 21 or more hours per week 12
  • 10 hours or less 66
  • CCSSE, 2007

64
Most students are never taught how to study. We
call it the hidden curriculum. Marcy
Fallon University of Maryland, 2002
65
Students are afraid afraid of failing, of not
understanding, of having their ignorance exposed
or their prejudices challenged, of looking
foolish in front of their peers.
Parker Palmer The Courage to
Teach, 1998
66
Role of Failure Those students who do well
in my class arent afraid to fail. If they read
a problem and dont instantly know how to do it,
they dont quit or feel embarrassed. They
understand that theyre not failing the course
because of a failed experiment. Faculty
Viewpoint Understanding University Success,
2003
67
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

68
An overview of student development and student
development theory should be included among the
conceptual elements of an advisor development
program.
69
It is important for advisors to have some
understanding of student development because
students personal development has a direct
bearing on whether they are ready to pursue
academic or personal goals.
70
Student development is far too important to be
viewed only as a role for student affairs
professionals. Evans, Forney, Guido-DeBrito,
1998, 2009
  • Collaborative efforts with faculty are
    necessary to provide developmental programs and
    services. Chickering and Reisser, 1993

71
Psychosocial Development Models
  • Adults Schlossberg Taylor, Marienau
    Fiddler
  • Gay/Lesbian Cass
  • Minorities Ruiz Cross Sue Sue
  • Bi-Racial Poston
  • Women Belenky, Gilligan
  • Others ????

72
Adult students often recycle through
developmental issues faced by younger students.
Chickering and Reisser, 1993
73
Inwardly, adult students relate to teachers as
elders, even if the age difference is reversed
they may be as apprehensive as younger students
tend to be. Parker Palmer
74
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

75
Increasing student persistence is a continuing
concern in higher education
76
Four indicators of success
  1. Retention
  2. Graduation
  3. Transfer
  4. Career Placement

77
No student service is mentioned in retention
research more often as a means of promoting
student persistence than academic advising. The
Strategic Management of College
Enrollments Hossler and Bean, 1990
78
Quality interaction with faculty seems to be more
important that any other single college factor in
determining minority student persistence. Levi
n and Levin 1991
79
Making the Most of College Good advising may
be the single most underestimated characteristic
of a successful college experience. Richard
Light, 2001
80
For community college students, frequent
interaction with faculty and advisers outside of
class all had a positive impact on preventing
students from dropping out. Regina Deil
Amen Chronicle of Higher Education August
17, 2005
81
Three interventions with greatest impact on
student retention in all colleges
  • First year programs
  • Academic Advising
  • Learning Support
  • WWISR 2004, 2010

82
Retention practices with greatest impact
  • 1. First-year programs
  • 2. Academic Advising
  • 3. Learning support Habley McClanahan,
    WWISR 2004

83
Most faculty agree there is a relationship
between advising and retention.
84
There is a relationship between advising and
retention. (n1594) Agree/strongly
agree 86 Disagree 4 Brown Survey,
2001-2009
85
Relationship between advising and retention?
  • More faculty members need to know this.
  • Brown Survey of Faculty 2001-2009

86
Even if there are no conventional rewards for
conscientious performance, faculty members can be
motivated if the issues are significant, and they
can feel they are making a contribution.
Derek Bok, Harvard University Universities in the
Marketplace, 2003
87
What happens to students after they enroll
frequently has a more powerful impact on whether
they persist or leave. Vincent Tinto, 1993
88
Usual Theories of Student Departure
  • Its something about them.

89
Talking About Leaving 40 leave
engineering 50 leave biological sciences 60
leave mathematics Why undergraduates leave
the sciences E. Seymour N. Hewitt, 1997
90
Talking About Leaving Students with 650 Math
SATs 40 leave engineering 50 leave
biological sciences 60 leave mathematics
Why undergraduates leave the sciences E.
Seymour N. Hewitt, 1997
91
Black Students Rates of Degree Completion by
Ability Quartile (Test Scores and high school
grades)
  • Completers Departers
  • Lowest quartile 17.2
    70.2
  • Second quartile 29.2
    52.2
  • Third quartile 35.1
    54.8
  • Highest quartile 26.2
    61.3
  • Source Undergraduate completion and persistence
    at four-year colleges and universities
    Detailed findings.
  • National Institute of Independent Colleges and
    Universities, 1990

92
Black Students Rates of Degree Completion by
Ability Quartile (Test Scores and high school
grades)
  • Completers Departers
  • Lowest quartile 17.2
    70.2
  • Second quartile 29.2
    52.2
  • Third quartile 35.1
    54.8
  • Highest quartile 26.2
    61.3
  • Source Undergraduate completion and persistence
    at four-year colleges and universities
    Detailed findings.
  • National Institute of Independent Colleges and
    Universities, 1990

93
We build beautiful campuses,
  • We hire distinguished faculty,

? We develop a challenging curriculum
then the wrong students show up! Dr. Betty
Siegel, Past President Kennesaw State
University
94
My first day, I looked around this beautiful,
lush, rich campus and thought, What the hell am
I doing here? Its only a matter of time before
they realize that Im not one of them. I am not
rich. I dont have a loving family to go home to
on holidays. Only foster parents who dont want
me, a stepdad in prison, and a dead mother...
95
And, I am not smart. I scored 580 on my SATs.
  • Professor Tammy Ramos BA and BS, St.
    Marys College of California JD, Notre Dame Law
    School

96
Validation Theory Many non-traditional students
want their doubts erased about their being
capable of learning. This is especially true
for first generation students, Hispanic and
African American students. Laura Rendon,
1994
97
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

98
Wes Habley Insight
  • Academic advising is the hub of the wheel, with
    linkages to all other support services on campus.

99
(No Transcript)
100
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

101
Student Expectation of Advisors
  • Availability/Accessibility
  • Knowledge
  • Care and Concern

102
Why do students leave college?
  • Isolation
  • Inability to connect with significant members of
    the campus community.

103
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

104
Advisor Responsibilities
  • Help students define and develop realistic goals
  • Identify special needs
  • Connect students to available resources
  • Assist students to plan consistent with their
    goals, interests, aptitudes limitations
  • Monitor progress toward goals
  • Discuss linkage between academic preparation and
    careers

105
Advisee Responsibilities
  • Gather relevant decision making information
  • Clarify goals, interests, and values
  • Become knowledgeable about programs, policies,
    requirements and procedures
  • Accept responsibility for decisions

106
Academic advising is assisting students to share
the responsibility for academic planning with
faculty, with students finally being able to find
their own answers and use their advisors as
sounding boards. Academic Advising for Student
Success Susan Frost, 1991
107
A Shared Responsibility A Model
108
Changing Environment Changing
Students 1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th, 5th,
6th Year 1st year 2nd Year 3rd Year ?
Need for Information
Changing Needs for Advising
Need for Consultation
  • Creamer, 2000

109
Changing Environment Changing Students 1st
Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th, 5th, 6th Year 1st
year 2nd Year 3rd Year ?
Need for Information
Changing Needs for Advising
Need for Consultation
Moving In Moving Through Moving On
Changing Contexts for Advising
  • PRESCRIPTIVE
    DEVELOPMENTAL
  • Lynch, 1989 Brown Rivas, 1994 Creamer, 2000

110
Changing Environment Changing Students 1st
Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th, 5th, 6th Year 1st
year 2nd Year 3rd Year ?
Need for Information
Changing Needs for Advising
Need for Consultation
Moving In Moving Through Moving On I
I/S I/S S/I
S I College/University (e.g., Faculty,
advisors) S Student Changing
Contexts for Advising
  • PRESCRIPTIVE
    DEVELOPMENTAL
  • Lynch, 1989 Brown Rivas, 1994 Creamer, 2000
    Brown, 2007

111
Conceptual Elements
  • Redefinition of advising
  • Role of advising and student development
  • Relationship of advising to persistence
  • Connections advising and support services
  • Student expectations of advising
  • Roles/responsibilities advisors and advisees
  • Career issues in advising

112
Students usually have a realistic understanding
of careers and how to prepare for them.
(n1574) Agree/strongly agree 58 Disagree 17
Brown Survey, 2001-2009
113
Students who are trying to make decisions about
major, career, or both need assistance answering
some basic questions. Betsy McCalla Wriggins,
2000
114
The question students should seek to answer
through advising...
  • NOT
  • What courses do I need to take?

115
The questions students should seek to answer
through advising...
  • How do I want to live my life?
  • What can I do in college to help move me toward
    this vision of my future?

116
Big enough questions What is it you plan to
do with your one wild and precious life? The
Summer Day Mary Oliver, 1990
117
What do employers look for? In many occupations,
your major will not be an issue. More desirable
are the transferable skills developed, such as
organising your time efficiently to meet
deadlines, working well on your own and in a
group.
  • Undergraduate Prospectus
  • University of Oxford, 2004-5

118
HIERARCHY OF ADVISING
Life goals, values, abilities, interests,
limitations.
Career/vocational opportunities
Academic Programs/Field of Study
Course selection
Class scheduling Terry OBannion, 1972, 1994
119
ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Informational
Conceptual
Relational
120
Informational Elements
  • Who are our students?
  • Academic and co-curricular programs
  • Institutional/Program policies and procedures
  • Referral resources
  • Student information systems
  • Resources for advisors
  • FERPA

121
Advisor Resources
  • Catalogue/bulletin
  • Advising handbook
  • Computer degree audits
  • Academic planning worksheets
  • Advising meeting records and notes

122
Peggy Kings Advice Asynchronous Delivery
  • Web pages
  • E and V mail
  • Cybercast
  • Listservs
  • Bulletin boards
  • Kiosks
  • Video/Audio tapes
  • Telephone info. Lines

123
ADVISOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Informational
Conceptual
Relational
124
Relational Elements
  • Interview Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Rapport Building
  • Referral Skills
  • Decision-making process
  • Multicultural Advising Skills (ethnicities,
    gender issues, disability issues, etc.)

125
Social Influence Theory
  • Attractiveness
  • Expertness
  • Trustworthiness Hovland, Janis, Kelley, 1953

126
Advisor Skills
  • Listening--Comfortable with silence
  • Open-ended questions
  • Providing clarification and feedback
  • Being positive
  • Self-disclosing
  • Offering options and alternatives

127
Relational Elements
  • Interview Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Rapport Building
  • Referral Skills
  • Decision-making process
  • Multicultural Advising Skills (ethnicities,
    gender issues, disability issues, etc.)

128
Referral Skills
  • Know how to refer and when
  • Dont refer too quickly
  • Know referral resources
  • Clarify reasons for referral
  • Explain what referral resource will provide
  • Refer to a specific person
  • Assist in making the appointment
  • Follow-up

129
Relational Elements
  • Interview Skills
  • Communication Skills
  • Rapport Building
  • Referral Skills
  • Decision-making process
  • Multicultural Advising Skills (ethnicities,
    gender issues, disability issues, etc.)

130
Treating everyone the same may be equal
treatment, but it may not be equitable treatment.
131
A Principle Human beings seek to economize on
the energy required to make distinctions.
132
Human beings seek to economize on the energy
required to make distinctions.
Most houseplants die because we treat them all
the same.
133
Categories of otherness Beverly D. Tatum, 1999
  • Otherness
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Religion
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Socio-economic status
  • Age
  • Physical/Mental Ability

134
Categories of otherness Beverly D. Tatum, 1999
  • Otherness
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Religion
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Socio-economic status
  • Age
  • Physical/Mental Ability
  • Form of oppression
  • Racism/ethnocentrism
  • Sexism
  • Religious oppression
  • Homophobia
  • Classism
  • Ageism
  • Ableism

135
Pluralistic Advising Skills
  • Understand, acknowledge, value difference.
  • Self-assess biases and attitudes.
  • Increase knowledge base of diverse groups (in the
    communities you serve.)
  • Use culturally appropriate strategies.
  • Avoid over-generalizations.
  • Brown Rivas, 1994

136
Training in information is still the primary area
of focus and content for advisor development
programs. Relational issues tend to be least
often included. 5th 6th National Surveys of
Academic Advising
137
Training focused on informational aspects of
academic advising perpetuates the idea that
advising is information giving rather than a
teaching relationship.
138
Advisor Topics of Greatest Concern
  • Relationship between advising and retention
  • Going beyond class scheduling
  • Early identification of student needs
  • Engaging faculty in advising
  • Communication and relational skills in advising
  • Noel-Levitz, 2006

139
Elements of Content
Conceptual What advisors should UNDERSTAND
Informational What advisors should KNOW
Relational What advisors should DO
140
Factors to consider when planning advisor
development programs
  • SKILL Understanding and applying basic
    principles necessary to be an effective
    advisor.
  • EXPERIENCE Length of service as an advisor.
  • WILLINGNESS Extent to which an individual
    desires to participate in academic advising.

141
Successful advisor development programs
integrate 1. content areas 2. skill
levels experience 3. willingness to
participate of advisors.
142
Preferred Advisor Development Format
  • Group setting 84
  • Noel-Levitz, 2006

143
Advisor Development Techniques
External presenters
Internal presenters
Readings and discussions
Quizzes
Consensus building
Panel discussions
Brainstorming issues
Role play
Simulations
Group discussions
Case studies
Video/CD presentations
144
Faculty members are generally interested in
achieving high levels of competence--they seek to
do as well as they can for their
students. J. Linquist, 1978
145
Obtaining Participation
  • Secure administrative support
  • Form a planning group
  • Conduct a needs assessment
  • Involve advisors on the program
  • Publicize widely-stress benefits
  • Schedule to avoid conflicts
  • Select appealing location
  • Offer incentives
  • Provide multiple sessions
  • Make attendance an expectation
  • Assess and use for future programs

146
Make on-going professional development an
institutional responsibility and part of the job
description of educators, fulltime and part
time. Carnegie Foundation, 2008
147
The Principle All individuals engaged in
academic advising should participate in
pre-service and/or in-service development
programs.
148
Institutions dont change. Institutional/organi
zational change happens only when individuals
take the initiative to create change in their
areas of responsibility. Peter Senge, MIT
Center for Organizational Learning
149
It took a team of experts to build the Titanic.
  • An amateur working all alone built the Ark.

150
Communities of Practice
  • Monroe Community College Faculty advisor
    workshops
  • Fox Valley Tech Developmental advising system
  • SW Missouri State Developing Master Advisors
  • Utah Valley State Advisor Certification
  • University of Washington Advisor Education
    Program

151
Innovative Educators Academic Advising Symposium
Series Training Academic Advisors Conceptual,
Relational, and Informational Issues
  • Tom Brown
  • www.tbrownassociates.com
  • tom_at_tbrownassociates.com
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