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Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria Update

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Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria Update Sheryl Squier DPI Educational Consultant Speech and Language Programs 608/266-1783 sheryl.squier_at_dpi.state.wi.us – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria Update


1
Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria Update
  • Sheryl Squier
  • DPI Educational Consultant
  • Speech and Language Programs
  • 608/266-1783
  • sheryl.squier_at_dpi.state.wi.us

2
DPI Web Site
  • http//www.dpi.state.wi.us
  • Links to DPI and Professional Resources for
    Speech and Language
  • Other Information
  •    
  • S/L Technical Assistance Guide

3
Agenda
  • Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria
  • Special Education
  • Re-Evaluation
  • Related Services
  • The IEP

4
Speech and Language Eligibility Criteria
5
IEP Team Process Evaluation Documenting The
Impairment
  • Speech or Language Impairment means
  • An impairment of speech or sound
    production, voice, fluency, or language that
    significantly affects educational performance or
    social, emotional or vocational development.
  • PI11.36(5)(a)

6
Special Education Study
  • Done in conjunction with UW-Oshkosh.
  • Mandated through the legislature to determine
    impact of the new rules on identification.
  • Speech and Language file review of at least 30 or
    more school districts.
  • Overall look at where we are in the state as far
    as using the S/L criteria and need for special
    education

7
Findings
  • Districts are using criteria
  • Overall Strengths
  • Generally good documentation and analysis
  • Exclusions applied correctly
  • Generally includes all elements required
  • Overall Areas to Address
  • Weak or missing documentation of how delay
    impacts educational, social/emotional, and/or
    vocational development
  • Weak or missing documentation of how sound
    production affects intelligibility

8
Findings
  • Continued.
  • Informal testing should support findings of
    formal test results.
  • Must include information from the childs natural
    environment (for example observation or
    parent/teacher report of childs skill in the
    classroom, home, community, and/or playground).

9
Educational Relevance of the Communication
Disorder
  • Academic-ability to benefit from the curriculum
  • Social-ability to interact with peers and adults
  • Vocational-ability to participate in work/job
    related activities

10
Educational Relevance of the Communication
Disorder
  • Examples of academic impact
  • below average grades
  • inability to complete language-based activities
    vs. non-language based activities
  • grades below the students ability level
  • From A training and Resource Manual for the
    implementation of State Eligibility Criteria for
    the Speech and Language Impaired
  • Florida Department of Education, Bureau of
    Instructional Support and Community Services,
    Division of Public Schools

11
Educational Relevance of the Communication
Disorder
  • Examples of social/emotional impact
  • peers tease student about communication problem
  • student demonstrates embarrassment and/or
    frustration regarding communication problem
  • student demonstrates difficulty interpreting
    communication intent
  • From A training and Resource Manual for the
    implementation of State Eligibility Criteria for
    the Speech and Language Impaired
  • Florida Department of Education, Bureau of
    Instructional Support and Community Services,
    Division of Public Schools

12
Educational Relevance of the Communication
Disorder
  • Examples of vocational impact include
  • inability of student to understand/follow oral
    directions
  • inappropriate response to coworker/supervisor
    comments
  • unable to answer/ask questions in a
    coherent/concise manner
  • From A training and Resource Manual for the
    implementation of State Eligibility Criteria for
    the Speech and Language Impaired
  • Florida Department of Education, Bureau of
    Instructional Support and Community Services,
    Division of Public Schools

13
Eligibility Criteria Oral Communication
  • Language
  • Norm Referenced Measures -1.75 S.D. (and)
  • Interferes with oral communication
  • Informal Assessment
  • Language Sampling
  • Observations
  • Interviews
  • Checklists (and)
  • Affects educational performance, or social,
    emotional, or vocational development
  • PI 11.36(5)

14
Eligibility Criteria Oral Communication
  • Alternate Method
  • When Used
  • formal tests are inappropriate or will not
    reflect the childs skill level
  • Requires two informal procedures
  • Considerations
  • Chronological age
  • Developmental level
  • Method of communication
  • Affects childs educational performance or
    social, emotional, or vocational development

15
Eligibility Criteria Speech Or Sound Production
  • Norm or Criterion Referenced Testing
  • Below 1.75 S.D. on test of articulation or
    phonology (or)
  • Sound errors beyond the time when 90 of
    typically developing children have acquired the
    sound (or)
  • One or more of the childs phonological patterns
    of sound are at least 40 disordered (or)
  • The child scores in the moderate to profound
    range of phonological process use on formal test
    AND..

16
Eligibility Criteria Speech Or Sound Production
  • Intelligibility of the childs speech is
    significantly affected
  • Anecdotal reporting (e.g. parent report)
  • Intelligibility ratio (analysis of childs
    speech)
  • AND
  • Affects educational performance, or social,
    emotional, or vocational development
  • PI 11.36(5)


17
Calculating Percent of Speech Intelligibility
  • of Intelligible Words X 100 of
  • Total of Words
    Intelligible

  • Words

18
Speech Intelligibility Expectations 3 to 5 Year
Olds
  • Age Average Range
  • 3 73 54-80
  • 4 93
    73-100
  • 5 Not Reported 90-100
  • (Gordon-Brannan, 1994 Gordon-Brannan Hodson,
    2000 Hodson, 2002 Pena-Brooks Hedge, 2000
    Vihman Greenlee, 1987 Vihman, 1998)

19
Anecdotal Reporting
  • How well is your child understood when s/he talks
    to you and to other people?
  • How often do you and other people understand your
    child when s/he is speaking?
  • When your child is not understood by you and by
    other people, what does s/he do?

20
Eligibility Criteria Voice
  • Documentation of a vocal impairment
  • Atypical characteristic of loudness, pitch,
    quality, or resonance for childs age and gender
  • Not due to temporary factors
  • Allergies, respiratory virus, infections, puberty
  • Affects educational performance, or social,
    emotional, or vocational development
  • PI 11.36(5)

21
Eligibility Criteria Fluency
  • Speaking behaviors characteristic of a fluency
    disorder are present
  • Repetitions, sound prolongations, irregular
    speaking rate, anxiety toward speaking, avoidance
    of speaking situations
  • AND
  • Affects educational performance, or social,
    emotional, or vocational development

22
Eligibility Criteria Exclusions
  • Mild, transitory or developmentally appropriate
    speech or language difficulties
  • Performance that is consistent with developmental
    levels (unless required to benefit from
    educational programs)
  • Dialectal differences or from learning English as
    a second language
  • Difficulties with auditory processing
  • Tongue thrust
  • Elective or selective mutism or school phobia

23
Special Education
24
Special Education
  • IDEA, Title 34 CFR, Sec. 300.25
  • Special Education means specially designed
    instruction provided, at no cost to the parents,
    to meet the unique needs of a child with a
    disability.

25
Determining The Need For Special Education
  • The IEP Team shall identify all of the following
  • Needs that cannot be met in the regular education
    program
  • Modifications that can be made in the regular
    education program
  • Additions or modifications the child needs that
    are not provided through the general education
    curriculum
  • PI 11.35

26
IEP Team Makes Decisions
  • The IEP team determines how the communication
    needs will be met
  • In the general education curriculum
  • OR
  • Through another special education provider
  • OR
  • That the communication needs require speech and
    language services

27
Findings
  • IEP teams sometimes consider the first question
    (needs that cannot be met in the general
    education setting).
  • Most often the second question is not addressed
    (modifications required to access regular
    education).
  • IEP teams have a tendency to jump directly to the
    third question (additions not provided through
    regular education) once the child is identified
    as having a S/L impairment

28
Re-evaluation
29
Speech and Language Services Re-evaluation
  • SLP IEP Team Member
  • Consider any remaining speech and language needs
    and the Need for Special Education and Related
    Services

30
Re-Evaluation
  • Identified impairment requires re-evaluation for
    discontinuation of services
  • both related service and special education
  • Special Education
  • Related Service

31
Related Service
32
Related Service
  • Related services means transportation and such
    developmental, corrective and other supportive
    services that are required to assist a child with
    a disability to benefit from special education
    and includes speech language pathology.
  • Chapter 115, Subchapter V, 115.76(14)
  • IDEA, Title 34 CFR, sec. 300.22

33
Speech and Language Services
  • Special Education and Related Service
  • Generally the same
  • Service Due to an Impairment
  • special education
  • To Benefit From Special Ed.
  • related service

34
S/L Related Service
  • Educational Relevance and Necessity
  • Questions to Consider
  • What is the specific oral language deficit that
    is preventing the students access to or ability
    to make meaningful progress in the special
    education service?
  • Is there an overlap or duplication of services?
  • Does the student require services that can only
    be provided by a licensed speech/language
    pathologist?

35
Considerations
  • S/L Only Area of Suspected Impairment
  • Child Does Not Meet Eligibility Criteria
  • IEP Team Explores Other Options
  • Document needs of child
  • Identify non-special education options

36
Considerations
  • Child Identified With a Disability
  • Does Not Meet S/L Eligibility
  • IEP Team Considers Speech and Language Services

37
Considerations
  • Child With a Disability
  • Receives special education services in area other
    than speech and language
  • IEP Team Suspects Additional Services Are Needed
  • Speech and Language Pathologist must be team
    member
  • Re-evaluation is a case by case determination
  • S/L services are considered

38
The
  • IEP

39
The IEP IEP Services
  • Requirement
  • Amount and frequency
  • Duration
  • Location
  • Finding
  • Most commonly found error
  • Some IEPs do not include clear statements of the
    amount or the frequency of the IEP services

40
The IEP Present Level Of Educational
Performance (PLOEP)
  • Requirement
  • Baseline data corresponding to each annual goal
  • How the disability affects childs progress in
    general curriculum
  • Understandable language
  • Finding
  • Lack of baseline date is the most frequently
    cited error
  • Test scores without explanation

41
The IEP Measurable Annual Goals,
  • Requirement
  • Information directly related to PLOEP
  • Short term objectives or benchmarks (2)
  • Address needs related to disability
  • Measurable level of attainment at end of 12
    months
  • Finding
  • IEPs often do not include measurable annual goal
    statements
  • The annual goals are often not 12 month goals

42
The IEP Benchmarks, and Short Term Objectives
  • Requirement
  • Measurable and a minimum of two per goal
  • General indicators of progress towards goal
  • Sequential
  • Findings
  • Often do not include expected levels of attainment

43
The IEP Reporting Progress to Parents of
Children With Disabilities
  • Informed at least as often as parents of
    non-disabled children.
  • IEP progress on annual goals.
  • Can goals be achieved by end of year (12 month
    period)?

44
Questions
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