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A National Crisis: The State of Computer Science and Information Technology in Schools and Future Workforce Projections Joe Kmoch joe@jkmoch.com Milwaukee Public Schools May 3, 2013

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Title: A National Crisis: The State of Computer Science and Information Technology in Schools and Future Workforce Projections Joe Kmoch joe@jkmoch.com Milwaukee Public Schools May 3, 2013


1
A National Crisis The State of Computer Science
and Information Technology in Schools and Future
Workforce Projections Joe Kmoch
joe_at_jkmoch.com Milwaukee Public Schools May 3,
2013
2
Session Description
  • This session will explore the trends in the
    workforce for computing specialists as defined by
    the U.S. Department of Labor, and look at the
    pipeline to fill the nearly 1.5 million positions
    that will be coming available over the next six
    to eight years. Then well look at approaches to
    deal with this problem along with resources
    available.

3
Three Challenges
  • The computing community in the US faces three
    significant and interrelated challenges in
    maintaining a robust IT workforce
  • Underproduction
  • Underrepresentation
  • Lack of a presence in K-12 education
  • (Jan Cuny, NSF CS10K Initiative)

4
Overview
5
Snapshot U.S. Employment through 2020
Source Jobs data are calculated from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
6
Quick Facts about Computing Jobs Though 2020
Computing and mathematics is one of the TOP 10
fastest growing major occupational groups
2010-2020. 150,000 job openings in computing
annually. 1 in every 2 STEM jobs will be in
computing in 2020.
Sources Jobs data are calculated from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
Educational levels are calculated from BLS
Occupational Projections Data, Employment
2010-2020, available at http//data.bls.gov/oep/
and the BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook
2010-2020, available at http//bls.gov/ooh/.
7
U.S. Employment through 2020 How Computing Stacks
Up To Healthcare
Growth Rates
  • 22 job growth rate
  • in computing jobs, as comparable to healthcare
    job growth rates 2010-2020.
  • 51,000 projected shortfall
  • in qualified health IT workers 2011-2015.
  • 90 of physicians
  • to use electronic health records by 2019 as a
    result of the federal HITECH Act of 2009.

Healthcare practitioners and technicians
Sources Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS),
Employment Projections 2010-2020, available at
http//www.bls.gov/emp/. U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services (HHS), HITECH Programs,
http//www.healthit.gov. Congressional Budget
Office, Analysis of HITECH Act of 2009.
8
The Bright Future For Computing Jobs
9
Total Employment in STEM in 2020 Science,
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Subtotals do not equal 9.2 million due to
rounding. Source Jobs data are calculated from
the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment
Projections 2010-2020, available at
http//www.bls.gov/emp/. STEM is defined here to
include non-medical occupations.
10
Where the STEM Jobs Will Be Projected Annual
Growth of STEM Job Openings 2010-2020
  • STEM is defined here to include non-medical
    occupations.
  • Source Jobs data are calculated from the Bureau
    of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
    2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.

11
Where the STEM Jobs Will Be Annual STEM Degrees
(2009) and Annual STEM Job Openings (2010-2020)
Sources Degree data are calculated from the
National Science Foundation (NSF), Science and
Engineering Indicators 2012, available at
http//www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind12/appendix.htm
. Annual jobs data are calculated from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
STEM is defined here to include non-medical
degrees and occupations.
12
Where the STEM Jobs Will Be Top 10 STEM
Occupations by Total Employment in 2020
Source Jobs data are calculated from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
STEM is defined here to include non-medical
occupations.
13
By the Numbers Future Workforce (2010-2020
projections)
  • Expected Growth in jobs is very high in CS/IT and
    Engineering
  • CS/IT (us dept of labor 15-1100)
  • 2010 actual 3,426,000
  • 2020 projected 4,184,700
  • Engineers (us dept of labor 17-2000)
  • 2010 actual 1,519,000
  • 2020 projected 1,679,400

14
By the Numbers Future Workforce (2010-2020
projections)
  • CS/IT, 22, 758,800 new jobs
  • Software Developers Programmers, 25
  • Computer System Analysts, 22
  • Database Sys Admins Network Arch, 28
  • Computer Support Specialists, 18
  • Security Analyst, Web Dev, CS Res, others, 15
  • Engineers, 11, 160,400 new jobs
  • http//www.bls.gov/emp/tables.htm

15
By the Numbers Future Workforce (2010-2020
projections)
  • CS/IT, 1366.2 (758.8 growth 607.4 repl)
  • Software Dev Prog, 493.9 (314.6 gr 179.3
    repl)
  • Computer System Analysts, 222.5 (120.4 gr 104.1
    repl)
  • DB Sys Admins Network Arch, 207.9 (130.6 gr
    77.3 repl)
  • Comp Support Specialists, 269.5 (110.0 gr 159.5
    repl)
  • Security Analyst, Web Dev, CS Res, others, 172.5
    (83.3 gr 89.2 repl)
  • Engineers, 526.0 (160.4 growth, 365.6 repl.)

16
Earnings Potential in Computing
17
Where the U.S. Jobs Will Be Top 10 Major
Occupational Groups 2010-2020 and Average
Salaries in May 2011
Major Occupational Group Growth 2010-2020 2011 Average Annual Salary
1 Healthcare Support Occupations 35 27,370
2 Personal Care and Service Occupations 27 24,620
3 Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations 26 72,730
4 Community and Social Service Occupations 24 43,830
5 Construction and Extraction Occupations 22 44,630
6 Computer and Mathematical Occupations 22 78,730
7 Business and Financial Operations Occupations 17 68,740
8 Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 16 67,470
9 Education, Training, and Library Occupations 15 50,870
10 Transportation and Material Moving Occupations 15 33,200
Sources Jobs data are from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
Salary data are from BLS Occupational Employment
Statistics, May 2011, available at
http//www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_nat.htm.
18
Where the STEM Jobs Will Be Projected Growth of
Selected STEM Jobs 2010-2020
STEM Job 2010 Total Employment Growth 2010-2020 2011 Average Annual Salary
Engineering and Architectural Managers 176,800 9 129,350
Computer and Information Systems Managers 307,900 18 125,660
Aerospace Engineers 81,000 5 103,870
Software Developers, Systems and Applications 913,100 30 96,250
Biochemists and Biophysicists 25,100 31 87,640
Civil Engineers 262,800 19 82,710
Database Administrators 110,800 31 77,350
Environmental Scientists 89,400 19 68,810
Chemists 82,200 4 74,780
Anthropologists and Archeologists 6,100 21 59,040
Sources Jobs data are from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics (BLS), Employment Projections
2010-2020, available at http//www.bls.gov/emp/.
Salary data are from BLS Occupational Employment
Statistics, May 2011, available at
http//www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_nat.htm. STEM
is defined here to include non-medical
occupations.
19
Pipeline of Talent in Computing
20
Higher Education Pipeline in Computing
Source National Science Foundation, Science and
Engineering Indicators 2012 and various years,
available at http//www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind12
/. Data are not available from 1999.
21
Higher Education Pipeline in Computing CRA
Taulbee Survey Results
Source Computing Research Association, Taulbee
Survey 2010-2011, available at http//www.cra.org/
resources/taulbee/ (providing voluntary responses
from Ph.D.-granting universities on new
enrollments and degrees awarded in their
undergraduate CS/CE programs.
22
High School Advanced Placement Exams 2011
Source College Board, Advanced Placement (AP)
Exam Data 2011, available at http//professionals.
collegeboard.com/data-reports-research/ap/data.
Calculus represents the combined data of Calculus
AB and BC. Physics represents the combined data
of Physics B, CElectricity and Magnetism, and
CMechanics. Computer Science represents combined
data of Computer Science A and B.
23
High School Advanced Placement Exams 1997-2011
Source College Board, Advanced Placement (AP)
Exam Data 2011, available at http//professionals.
collegeboard.com/data-reports-research/ap/data.
Calculus represents the combined data of Calculus
AB and BC. Physics represents the combined data
of Physics B, CElectricity and Magnetism, and
CMechanics. Computer Science represents combined
data of Computer Science A and B.
24
High School Advanced Placement Exams 2011
Male
Female
Source College Board, Advanced Placement (AP)
Exam Data 2011, available at http//professionals.
collegeboard.com/data-reports-research/ap/data.
Calculus represents the combined data of Calculus
AB and BC. Physics represents the combined data
of Physics B, CElectricity and Magnetism, and
CMechanics. Computer Science represents combined
data of Computer Science A and B.
25
Conclusion
26
Conclusion
  • K-12 computer science education will open more
    economic opportunities than any other subject for
    the 21st Century.
  • The future is bright for students entering in
    this field or gaining this critical knowledge to
    apply to almost any field of employment.
  • Jobs in computing are among the fastest growing
    of any profession and pay higher wages.
  • Despite these opportunities, significant barriers
    exist to exposing students to computer science in
    K-12 and keeping them in the computing education
    pipeline
  • We need to address the key issues
  • Clarify the role and place for K-12 computer
    science education
  • Lift state standards and make courses count
  • Support computer science teachers
  • Address diversity issues
  • We need to put computer science within the core
    of a students education

27
Thats nice data, but so what?
Slide is from Ed Lazowska
The instructional practices and assessments
discussed or shown are not an endorsement by ACM
or the U.S. Department of Education.
28
How did we get to where were at in K-12?
  • Perceptions of CS/IT job market
  • Perceptions of the kind of jobs these are
  • Budget cutting
  • CS/IT courses deemed expendable, not required,
    not mainstream
  • Results of schools reacting to NCLB

29
How did we get to this situation in K-12?
  • Lack of courses
  • Lack of trained and interested teachers
  • Lack of professional development opportunities
  • Cost of teacher certification
  • Need for development of a national curriculum
    similar to PLTW (including courses, prof
    development, marketing)
  • focused more around computer science and
    computational thinking

30
What can we do?
  • Get Involved...
  • Advocate for CS IT

31
But how???
  • Learn about advocacy and advising materials
  • Use them in your classroom with students
  • Talk with parents
  • Talk with your principal and district
    administrators
  • Talk with current students
  • Visit middle school students
  • Develop workshops for pre-high school students

32
Computing is the new literacy
  • ...the ability to make digital technology do
    whatever, within the possible one wants it to do
    to bend digital technology to ones needs,
    purposes and will, just as in the present we bend
    words and images.
  • --Marc Prensky, Edutopia, 1/13/2008
  • We want and need kids to be creators not just
    consumers of technology

33
Advocacy Small Group Activity
  • Heres a poster about computing careers and a
    Guide for Policy Makers
  • Pick one of them and get into small groups
  • If you have a poster, design a classroom lesson
    around the poster for appropriate age level (high
    school)
  • If you have the policy brochure, plan an advocacy
    event for a parents council or a school board
    meeting based on the brochure

34
CSTA
  • Both of these are from the CSTA.
  • This is a group you should join (its free for
    individuals)
  • Take a look at ncwitcstaresources.pbworks.com
  • Also csitresources.pbworks.com
  • Take a look at csta.acm.org

35
Imagine Your Future... brochure activity
  • Read the brochure
  • Imagine Your Future in Computing
  • In small groups, think about
  • how you could use this in your school
  • creating an activity in your classroom
  • Well share ideas in about 10 min

36
CSTA WI-Dairyland Chapter
  • Brand new as of January, 2013
  • Events
  • A Saturday workshop (Feb) with Exploring Computer
    Science leaders from Chicago
  • A weekday student computing competition and adhoc
    chapter meeting (Apr)
  • The CS/IT strand here at WMC
  • Join us by joining national CSTA (free)

37
CS Ed Week
  • Starting in 2010, Computer Science Education Week
    will always be held during the week containing
    December 9 (Dec 8-14, 2013)
  • This is the week of Grace Hoppers birthday
    (December 9, 1906)
  • to recognize the critical role of computing in
    todays society and the imperative to bolster
    computer science education at all levels. 
  • http//csedweek.org

38
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39
NCWIT
  • National Center for Women and Information
    Technology
  • K-12 Alliance produces many materials
  • Award for Aspirations in Computing
  • Counselor materials ltncwit.org/c4cgt
  • Many other readable resources about computing,
    girls in computing, what courses should I be
    taking, best practices
  • See ncwitcstaresources.pbworks.com

40
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41
NCWIT C4C materials
  • Pathway Resources (handouts)
  • University, Two-year College, Military
  • Poster
  • Counselor Talking Points
  • Computing Education and Future Jobs national,
    state and congressional district data
    lthttp//www.ncwit.org/edjobsmapgt
  • Webinar, info sheet, upcoming slideshow

42
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43
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44
Computing in the Core
  • Advocating for K-12 Computer Science Education
  • Coalition of associations, corporations,
    scientific societies and other non-profits
  • Advocate to elevate cs education to a core
    academic subject in K-12 education
  • ACM, CSTA, Google, IEEE Microsoft, NCWIT, College
    Board, NCTM, NSTA, Oracle, SAS
  • lthttp//www.computinginthecore.orggt

45
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46
Questions?
  • Thank you
  • Joe Kmoch
  • joe_at_jkmoch.com
  • http//expandingcswisconsin.pbworks.com
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