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The Georgia Wolf Trap Project

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All analyses of follow-up in 1st grade and 2nd grade were conducted controlling for Pretest Kindergarten PPVT P=.03 Effect ... Special Needs CRCT Scores ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Georgia Wolf Trap Project


1
  • The Georgia Wolf Trap Project
  • 2005-2008
  • Georgia Wolf Trap
  • for English Language Learners
  • 2008-2012

2
A collaboration of Alliance Theatre, Fulton
County Schools, and Georgia State University
Funded (2005-2012) by the U.S. Department of
Education Arts Education Model Development and
Dissemination Program (AEMDD)
3
AEMDD Criteria
  • Discipline-specific arts instruction and
  • Enhancement of academic achievement
  • Low-income children

4
Context of the Intervention
  • Language development in early childhood predicts
    school performance.
  • The achievement gap begins before the childs
    first day of school.
  • Low-income children begin Kindergarten with less
    than half the vocabulary of high-income students,
    challenging literacy development.

5
Premises of the Intervention
  • Social and communicative experiences that support
    the development of symbolic functioning are
    essential in early childhood.
  • Pretend play, the developmental foundation of
    drama, is the childs first language.
  • Joint pretense and story sharing can unpack
    language. Drama engages childrens emotions and
    intellect, transcending culture and class.

6
1st Project 2005-8
  • All Kindergarten classes in 6 schools
  • Random assignment of low-income schools to
    conditions pre-intervention/post-intervention
  • Professional learning opportunities for
    Kindergarten teachers in summer and fall
    artists and teachers collaboratively infuse drama
    into language lessons in January and February

7
Sample Characteristics
  • N 545 students
  • 36 special needs
  • 71 qualified for free or reduced lunch
  • 94 African American

8
Sample Starting Point
9
Hypotheses
  • Intervention students will show more improvement
    than control students in
  • Language Development
  • Writing (near transfer)
  • Academic Achievement (far transfer)

10
Language DevelopmentSyntax
11
Writing Quantity
Vocabulary
Sentences
12
Writing Quality
Percentage of Students with Improvement over Time
13
Report Card GradesFirst Grade (Cohorts 1 2)
Special Needs
14
CRCT ScoresFirst Grade (Cohorts 1 2) Special
Needs
15
Contributions
  • Drama Developmental Appropriateness
  • Helping children find their voicechild-centered
    education supports symbolic development
  • Authentic, meaningful activity in a language-rich
    and emotionally engaging context
  • Usefulness of this approach for development and
    learning

16
Next?
  • Georgia Wolf Trap for
  • English Language Learners

17
Context
  • In 2008 Latino students were the largest minority
    in American schools - 11 Million or 22
  • Facing an educational crisis
  • Less likely to be enrolled in pre-K programs
  • Twice as likely to be retained
  • Highest dropout rates18.3 in 2008 (compared
    to the total rate of 8).

18
  • White House Initiative on Educational Excellence
    for Hispanics
  • October 19, 2010

19
  • White House Initiative advocates enhanced pre-K
    preparation and K-12 educational reforms for
    Latino students
  • Fulton County was the third most populous Latino
    community in GA over 20 living in poverty many
    students with limited English proficiency
  • FC schools are English only
  • Pull out/push in services in K45 minutes/day

20
  • Achievement gap in 2008
  • 70 of Fulton County ELL K students finished the
    year with low English proficiency
  • 33were below academic expectations after 1st
    grade
  • only 39 passed all areas of GA high school
    graduation test
  • Language minority and low income status double
    risk for academic failure

21
  • Background Quantity of exposure to English in
    class does not predict acquisition quality of
    engagement with English does (Snow et al., 1998).
  • Hypothesis an emphasis on meaningful
    communication experiences will support
    acquisition.
  • Professional development for teachers as before
    teaching artists as coaches, November-March
  • Drama activitiesimprovised guided
    enactmentcan disambiguate language

22
  • Story sharing analyzing and enacting re-telling
    and reflecting
  • Elements in common with ESOL strategies
  • language embedded in meaningful contexts
  • using the senses, props, facial expressions
  • physicalization, repetition
  • incorporating students ideas

23
Design
  • Paired Cluster/random assignment of schools to
    conditions (6 schools all K classrooms)
  • Random selection of research participants (all
    ELL)
  • Schools range from 39-68 ELL

24
Participants
  • 514 Kindergartners over three years 2009-12
  • All qualified as ELL, all speak Spanish at home
  • 97 qualified for free or reduced lunch
  • All regular education students

25
Measures
  • District ESOL Screening Measures - English
  • WAPT-L/S - at registration
  • Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs - January/February
  • WMLS-R - two languages - pre (Sept Oct) and
    post (April May)
  • Story Writing - English only - pre and post
  • G-KIDS - first grade readiness test - English
    only

26
Significance Testing Treatment Received
  • All three years of professional learning (N12
    teachers)
  • Control group (N31 teachers)

27
Total Oral English
28
Story Writing - Fluency
29
Story Writing - Quality
30
Academic Achievement GKIDS
31
Academic Achievement GKIDS
32
What We Learned
  • Drama links among emotion, meaning, words
  • Brief intervention gt noteworthy effects in
    language and mathematics
  • Enhanced language engagement (versus exposure or
    drill)

33
What is driving all this?Professional Learning
34
Professional Learning
  • Key to
  • Positive student outcomes
  • and
  • true reform

35
PL Process
  • PL is most effective when teachers are taught as
    they would teach
  • Workshops employed Wolf Trap strategies
  • PL takes time
  • Summer study
  • Opportunities throughout year to observe,
    co-teach
  • Three years duration

36
Evaluation Sources
  • Teachers evaluations
  • Teaching artists evaluations
  • Focus groups
  • Classroom observations
  • Teachers self-assessment surveys

37
Performance Measures
  • 100 developed lessons integrating drama during
    the residencies
  • 95 employed drama management techniques
  • 95 used Best Practices in Drama during the
    residencies
  • 90 indicated they would develop lessons using
    Best Practices in Drama after the residencies
    ended

38
What Did You Learn?
  • I learned to put down my guard and try new
    things dramatically with the students.
  • I learned how to effectively use my body and my
    voice to tell a story.
  • I learned how to build drama into my literacy
    instruction.
  • I learned how to incorporate Wolf Trap ideas in
    other areas of teaching.

39
PL Conclusions
  • Teachers recognize the learning taking place in
    their students socially, emotionally,
    linguistically, and cognitively.
  • Teachers applaud the PL model used, especially
    the Teaching Artist as coach in the classroom.
  • Over time, teachers increasingly used the
    strategies throughout their teaching.

40
It Makes a Difference
Oral Language
Story Writing Fluency
Story Writing Quality
41
  • Acknowledgements
  • Fulton County Schools
  • Alliance Theatre Education Department
  • Jackie Gray, Carol Jones, Michele Mummert, Denise
    Jennings, Jes Booth
  • GSU Audrey Ambrosino, Brooke Bays, Judy Orton,
    Lynda Kapsch, Heather Smith, Nicole Lorenzetti,
    Carol Ashong, Josephine Lindsley, Callie Reeves,
    Daniel Medina, Kareema Spells, Peter Samuelson,
    Elizabeth McGarragh, Macy Strickland, Lisa Quick,
    Joanna Sherwood, Beatrice Moreno, Araceli Santa
    Cruz, Inez McDaniel, Renzo Gobea, Brandi Harper,
    Kathryn Taylor, Meghann Griffin, Rachael Kaplan,
    Emily White, Billy Thompson

42
  • Thank you!
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