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Providing Opportunities for Scholarship and Research: contribution to the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID)

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Title: Duke Chemistry Department Author: Chris Golde Last modified by: fayorinde Created Date: 4/8/2003 9:42:50 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Providing Opportunities for Scholarship and Research: contribution to the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID)


1
Providing Opportunities for Scholarship and
Research contribution to the Carnegie Initiative
on the Doctorate (CID)
  • Basic Information, and Program Requirements for
    Graduate Students (Effective, Summer, 2005)
  • Department of Chemistry
  • Howard University
  • Washington, D.C.
  • www.chem.howard.edu
  • Tel. 202 806 6900

2
Departments Mission Statement
  • The Department of Chemistry at Howard University
    has a deep historical commitment to the training
    of African Americans and others of African
    descent. However, we actively recruit and train
    talented students from all communities, on both
    the undergraduate and graduate level. The
    Department fully dedicates itself to developing
    confident scholars through research, mentoring,
    professional development, and networking in order
    for them to excel in the global community. At
    the graduate level, we seek out promising
    students who can benefit from the Howard
    University experience by providing training in
    funded, and nationally competitive research
    projects that will prepare them for leadership
    roles in industrial, government, or university
    careers.

3
Broad Objectives
  • To maintain and build upon the role of the
    Department as a leading provider of doctorate
    education to students of African descent and
    other groups that are underrepresented in the
    chemical profession.
  • Increase graduate student enrollment by 100
    percent over a 5-year period
  • Increase Howards contribution of the nations
    annual production of African American Ph.D.s from
    its current 10 to about 15 in a 5-year period
    (based on 2004 data)
  • To provide significant opportunities in graduate
    education to those students whose level of
    preparation may not reflect their true potential.

4
Broad Objectives, cont.
  • To build upon a national recognition as a leading
    graduate chemistry program as perceived by peer
    institutions, the National Research Council , the
    American Chemical Society, and other relevant
    professional organizations.
  • To develop students who can demonstrate excellent
    theoretical knowledge, think critically, as well
    as communicate basic chemistry knowledge and
    research findings to scientists and students
    through oral presentations, lectures,
    peer-reviewed publications, and supervise
    undergraduate and graduate research projects
    (Developing future Stewards of the Profession)

5
Expected Outcomes
  • Increase graduate enrollment from the current 30
    to 40 by 2005/06, to 45 by 2006/07, to 50 by
    2007/08, to 55 by 2008/09, and to 60 by 2009/10
  • Increase the annual production of African
    American doctorates to 5 by 2008, and to 7 by
    2010.

6
Major Programmatic Initiatives
  • Early Assessment of Commitment and Competency
    (Quality Control)
  • Summer Workshop for incoming graduate students
  • Placement Examinations
  • Special Courses to Enhance Preparedness for
    Graduate Studies
  • Flexible Curriculum
  • Student-specific curriculum
  • Opportunity for interdisciplinarity.
  • Early transition to research enterprise
  • Integration of Professional Development into
    Curriculum

7
Early Quality Control Establishing Core
Competency
  • Standardized Placement Examinations in
    Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical
    Chemistry for In-coming Students
  • Use standardized ACS exams as placement exams for
    in-coming graduate students. Students must pass
    all 4 exams to demonstrate competency of
    undergraduate material.
  • Summer Academic Enhancement Workshop for
    In-coming Graduate Students
  • 6 weeks of Academic Enhancement in the Core
    Chemistry Sub-disciplines to prepare for Exams

8
Early quality control, cont.
  • Failure in any ACS sub-discipline exam
  • Special graduate courses will be offered to
    enhance preparedness for graduate studies in the
    sub-discipline
  • Students must pass the ACS exams at the end of
    the 1st Semester
  • Failure to pass ACS exams in the 4
    sub-disciplines at the end of first semester
  • Student would be placed in the Masters Program

9
Flexible and Student-specific Curriculum
  • After passing all ACS exams
  • Only 15 Hours of Advance Chemistry Courses
    Required Prior to Ph.D. Candidacy
  • Choice of Interdisciplinary Courses for
    additional Coursework to complete the 36 hours
    requirement
  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Biology
  • Chemical Engineering (Materials Science)
  • Teaching and Communication

10
Flexible Curriculum Early Transition to Research
  • Student to join research group end of 2nd
    Semester
  • Selection of Advisory Committee end of 2nd
    Semester

11
The Research Enterprise Group Mentoring through
an Advisory Committee
  • An Advisory Committee consisting of a Research
    Advisor and 2 other faculty, at least one must be
    from a different sub-discipline
  • The Advisory Committee will be included in the
    Dissertation Committee

12
Integration of Professional Development into
Curriculum Presentation Skills
  • Student to give an Original Idea Presentation
    to the Advisory Committee in the 3rd Semester.
    This shall be on a topic other than the students
    research
  • Student to give a defense of thesis proposal to
    the Advisory Committee.
  • Thesis proposal to be written in form of a grant
    application, which could be used as a basis for
    the application for candidacy.

13
Integration of Professional Development, cont.
  • Cumulative Exams
  • The cumulative exams will be based on suggested
    literature topics and/or topics from departmental
    seminars.
  • Students must pass 4 cumulative exams within 2
    years
  • Coffee, Snacks get-together prior to Friday
    seminars to foster collegial interaction between
    students and faculty

14
Cumulative Exam Schedule
  • Week of Sep 19
  • Inorganic
  • Organic
  • Week of Sep 26
  • Physical
  • Analytical
  • Week of Oct 17
  • Inorganic
  • Organic
  • Week of Oct 24
  • Physical
  • Analytical
  • Week of Nov 21
  • Inorganic
  • Organic
  • Week of Nov 28
  • Physical
  • Analytical
  • Week of Jan 15
  • Inorganic
  • Organic
  • Week of Jan 22
  • Physical
  • Analytical

15
Integration of Professional Development, cont.
  • Workshop on business presentation to be sponsored
    and offered by an Industry Partner (Monsanto,
    Colgate-Palmolive were past sponsors)
  • Oral Presentation Skills
  • Resume Preparation
  • Interview Skills

16
Integration of Professional Development, cont.
  • Each student must enroll in at least one
    Professional Development Course that includes all
    or some of these concepts
  • Ethical Case Studies
  • Oral Presentation Skills
  • Library Resources
  • Writing Grant Proposals
  • Writing Manuscripts
  • Pedagogies of Teaching

17
Integration of Professional Development, cont.,
Preparing Future Faculty (PFF)
  • Students will be encouraged to enroll in Howards
    Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) courses to satisfy
    the Professional Development Course requirement
  • Example, Teaching and Learning as a Scholarly
    Activity (GPFF 403)
  • A series of Lectures and Activities focusing on
    the Pedagogies of Teaching and Learning

18
Integration of Professional Development, cont.,
Curriculum Practical Training (CPT)
  • Provide opportunity for internship for Ph.D.
    candidates at Government and Industrial
    Laboratories

19
Significant transitions (and expected outcomes)
to be completed in 2 years
  • Completion of placement exams
  • Affirmation of basic knowledge
  • Completion of required courses
  • Broad and basic knowledge
  • Completion of cumulative exams
  • Exposure to current research literature
  • Presentation of Original Idea
  • Demonstrate ability to formulate new ideas
  • Research Experience
  • Beyond the technician stage
  • Oral defense of Research Proposal
  • Depth in knowledge base
  • Contribution to knowledge base
  • Application for Ph.D. Candidacy
  • Professional development

20
Summary Requirements for Ph.D. Candidacy (Max 2
years)
  • ACS Placement Examinations
  • Must pass exams in 4 divisions in 1st Semester
  • Coursework (minimum 18 credit hours required)
  • 3 Courses from sub-discipline (division)
  • 2 Courses from two other sub-disciplines
    (divisions)
  • 1 Professional Development Course
  • English Competency and Expository Writing
  • Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop
  • Cumulative Examinations (pass 4 exams)
  • Selection of Research Advisor/Project and
    Advisory Committee
  • Oral Presentation on original idea (3rd Semester)
  • Oral Presentation on dissertation proposal (4th
    Semester)
  • Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation Research
  • Application, and Admission to Candidacy

21
Summary Requirements for Ph.D. Degree
  • ACS Placement Examinations
  • Must pass exams in 4 divisions in 1st Semester
  • Coursework (minimum 18 credit hours required)
  • 3 Courses from discipline (division)
  • 2 Courses from two other disciplines (divisions)
  • 1 Professional Development Course
  • English Competency and Expository Writing
  • Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop
  • Cumulative Examinations (pass 4 exams)
  • Selection of Research Advisor/Project and
    Advisory Committee
  • Oral Presentation on original idea (3rd Semester)
  • Oral Presentation on dissertation proposal (4th
    Semester)
  • Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation Research
  • Application, and Admission to Candidacy (First 2
    YEARS)
  • Departmental Seminar Presentation (prior to
    Dissertation Defense)
  • Completion of 72 credit hours
  • Dissertation Completion
  • Final Oral Examination

22
Reflections on the CID Convening, August 12-16,
Palo Alto, CA
  • A Students Perspective
  • (Nicole John, Ph.D. Student)

23
Purpose of the Convening
  • To discuss various strategies used in the
    development of students as researchers and
    scholars.

24
Pedagogy of Research
  • The theory and practice of developing researchers
    and scholars is called the pedagogy of
    research. It involves
  • - all of the specific techniques, skills and
    habits of mind a researcher ought to know and
    exhibit
  • - how one teaches a student these techniques,
    skills and habits of mind
  • - how a student learns and in what settings
    and with whom a student learns best

25
Objective To develop students who have the
following skills.
  • Ability to ask questions and develop a line of
    inquiry
  • Competence in conducting research
  • Ability to share findings and communicate results
  • Ability to develop a professional identity as a
    researcher and scholar

26
Focus of the talks.
  • A - Theories that govern a Departments mode of
    activity in the graduate program.
  • B - The definition and importance of good
    mentoring.
  • C - The challenges involved in instituting good
    mentoring practices.
  • D - Different strategies employed to encourage
    faculty to implement good mentoring techniques.

27
A -Theories that govern a departments mode of
activity in the graduate program.
The apprenticeship model graduate education
as a form of professional training, an
institutional device guaranteeing education while
the student simultaneously works under a master.
28
Characteristics of a good apprenticeship model
  • Adequate training of new students by designated
    staff e.g. post-docs, senior graduate students
    and in the absence of these, the advising
    professor.
  • A safe period of trial and error.
  • Effective and efficient communication.
  • Timely correction so that faults do not become
    habit.

29
B - Good Mentoring
  • In Greek mythology, Mentor was the counselor and
    surrogate father to Telemachus while his father,
    Odysseus, was away. Mentor was key to Telemachus'
    growth by guiding, educating, and protecting him,
    introducing him to influential leaders, and
    teaching him valuable leadership skills. Mentor's
    role in shaping the character and philosophy of
    Telemachus in his childhood is not unlike the
    challenges and responsibilities faced today in
    academia in the everyday interactions between a
    faculty advisor and his or her graduate student.

30
Importance of Mentoring
  • Having a mentor - or better yet - multiple
    mentors, can be key to graduate student
    development and professional success.
  • Students with mentors are more likely to make
    timely progress toward their degrees, to enter
    their professions, and to meet the various
    challenges of their careers.
  • Just as professionalism is more than the
    acquisition of knowledge, so must mentoring
    extend beyond the classroom or laboratory and
    even beyond academic and career advisement.
  • We must begin to think of a Pedagogy of
    Mentoring

31
Pedagogies of Mentoring
  • Respect students as colleagues and thus encourage
    sharing of ideas, experiences, and ethics.
  • Create intellectual challenges and make standards
    clear through open, frequent, and consistent
    communication.
  • Provide reliable advice and continual
    encouragement.
  • Be readily available.
  • Multiple mentors. No mentor can know everything a
    given student might need to learn in order to
    succeed. Everyone benefits from multiple mentors
    of diverse talents, ages, and personalities. No
    one benefits when a mentor is too "possessive" of
    a student.

32
C - Challenges of Mentoring
  • Mentoring takes work, experience, and patience.
  • Good mentoring practices do not happen overnight.
  • The mentoring role changes, depending on the
    needs and stage of professional development of
    the student.

33
D - Strategies to encourage good mentoring
  • Institutions should incorporate mentoring and
    advising effectiveness in the criteria used for
    appraisals of faculty performance, including
    evaluations for the purposes of promotion and
    tenure.
  • Faculty Evaluation (bi-annual)
  • Exit Interview
  • Suggestion Box on Faculty Performance
  • Time-to-degree
  • Students should be advised to ask for survey
    information from potential Faculty advisors
  • Provide guidance on mentoring for new faculty and
    advisers, which can include briefings, workshops,
    the assignment of senior mentors, and
    instructions on campus and Internet resources.

http//www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/mentor/6.html
34
Strategies to encourage good mentoring
  • Sponsor more discussions of topics relevant to
    mentoring, such as professional standards,
    ethical values, and balancing career and personal
    life.
  • Create an institutional award for distinguished
    mentors. The White House Office of Science and
    Technology Policy and the American Association
    for the Advancement of Science have recently
    instituted such awards on the national level.
    Recognition at the Departmental level is a key
    first step.

http//www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/mentor/6.html
35
Resources
  • http//www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/mentor/1.html
    mentoring
  • http//sll.stanford.edu/projects/tomprof/newtompro
    f/postings/97.html
  • http//www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/mentor/6.html
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