Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with Families Minnesota's Experience with the NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with Families Minnesota's Experience with the NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance


1
Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with
Families Minnesota's Experience with the
NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance
  • Presenters
  • Jackie Crow Shoe, MN DHS Child Safety and
    Permanency Division
  • Deb Moses, DHS/Chemical Health Division
  • Carole Johnson, Minnesota Judicial Branch
  • Kari Earle, National Center for Substance Abuse
    and Child Welfare

2
Presentation Objectives
  • Developing a collaboration between government
    agencies
  • Developing practical products to meet community
    needs
  • Integrating AOD services into existing systems
  • Sharing lessons learned from parents

3
Childrens Justice Initiative
  • A collaborative project between MN DHS and MN
    Judicial Branch to improve the processing and
    outcomes of child protection cases
  • Mission To ensure that, in a fair and timely
    manner, abused and neglected children involved in
    the juvenile protection court system have safe,
    stable, permanent families.

4
Key Features
  • Seen through the eyes of a child
  • Role of judge in managing case
  • Importance of Permanency
  • Timelines as a priority
  • Integrated statewide

5
CJI-AOD Project
  • Under the umbrella of the Minnesotas Childrens
    Justice Initiative
  • NCSACW In-Depth Technical Assistance
  • Project Team
  • State Advisory Committee
  • Core Team
  • courts, child safety, chemical health, county,
    parents, community provider
  • Pilot Counties
  • Mentor Counties - Itasca, Stearns
  • Ten Phase I Counties
  • Tribal engagement and involvement

6
CJI-AOD Project
  • Seen as a priority because of the nature of
    addiction and recovery related to child safety,
    well being and permanency needs
  • Five Clocks highlight challenge of competing
    timelines

7
The Mission of CJI-AOD
  • To ensure that, in a fair and timely manner,
    abused and neglected children involved in
    juvenile protection court have safe, stable,
    permanent families by improving parental and
    family recovery from alcohol or other drug
    problems.

8
Minnesotas Context
  • Total Population over 5 million Child Population
    1.3 million
  • State Supervised County Administered Child
    Welfare System
  • Primarily locally funded
  • Governed by Reporting of Maltreatment to Minors
    Act 626.556
  • 18-19,000 reports per year are accepted for a CP
    response
  • Almost half of all reports are made by school
    personnel and law enforcement Regardless of
    response path
  • Disproportionately involves poor, single mothers
    and their children and families of color
  • MN CPS objectives
  • respond proportionately to the severity of the
    safety concern
  • enhance family engagement
  • promote early intervention and prevention
  • broaden community involvement

9
  • Differential Response System
  • 57.5 received family assessment 42.5 an
    investigation
  • Substantiation rate is 56 of all investigations
  • Consolidated Chemical Dependency Treatment Fund
  • 28,000 public pay clients
  • State funded County Administered with a 15
    match
  • Free market treatment system
  • Majority of child maltreatment being addressed is
    for neglect (65)

10
  • Families who neglected more likely to experience
    multiple family issues, including alcohol and
    other drug issues and poverty.
  • Approximately 1/3 of all families receive
    services.
  • AOD concerns are seen in over half of families
    needing services.
  • Only 11 of all CP interventions result in a
    Juvenile Protection Court Intervention of
    placement out of the home.

11
MN Differential Response Continuum
  • Family Assessment
  • Response for less serious cases
  • No determination of maltreatment
  • Comprehensive
  • Strength-based community-focused
  • Enhances Family Stability
  • Focus is on safety through engagement
  • Investigation
  • Response for substantial child endangerment cases
  • Did maltreatment occur?
  • Are Child Protective Services Needed?
  • Incident based with a focus on fact finding
  • Forensic in nature coordinated with law
    enforcement
  • May be perceived as intrusive and adversarial by
    family

12
The Five Clocks
  • MFIP
  • Child welfare system
  • Recovery process
  • Child development
  • Agency and staff timelines

13
Clock Three The Recovery Process
  • Often takes longer than substance abuse treatment
    funding allows.
  • Good outcomes are contingent on adequate length
    of treatment. This may be incompatible with child
    welfare deadlines.
  • The recovery timetable can be summarized as one
    day at a time, for the rest of your life.

14
CJI-AOD The Why and How
  • Now, more than ever, system collaboration is
    needed to improve outcomes for children
  • Achieving Better Outcomes
  • Important for personal growth, healthy emotional
    development, and positive sustained relationships
    of family members
  • Can reduce future child safety concerns
  • Can reduce treatment recidivism
  • Can reduce broader community consequences related
    to capacity, resources and cost

15
STEP 1 Using the 10-Element Framework to Set
Priorities and Objectives
  • Earlier engagement of parents in assessment,
    treatment and recovery
  • Improved practice through cross-system
    collaboration
  • Increased flexibility in individualized planning
    and treatment services
  • Improved training on overlap impact of AOD and
    Child Welfare concerns

16
STEP 2 Establishing Shared Values and
Principles
  • Accountability agencies cooperate and
    collaborate in order to establish the best
    outcomes
  • Partnerships actively involve families and
    communities in decision-making and solution
    building
  • Service Delivery assure fair and equitable
    access to early and effective interventions along
    the continuum of care
  • System Resources dedicate staff and resources to
    assist with implementation of project
    recommendations

17
Cross-System Practice Focus
  • Acknowledge deficits but focus on identifying
    family competence and seek to re-create the
    circumstances that allow competence to flourish.
  • Collaboration between the systems and the
    family increases the likelihood of finding
    solutions.
  • Choices made by the family are more likely to be
    implemented than choices made without their
    collaboration.

18
  • Success is a result of respectful interactions
    which recognize family competence, family choice
    and are demonstrated by
  • Respect and honesty
  • Fairness and equity
  • Solution-focused mutual accountability
  • Clear and transparent communication
  • Active mobilization of resources to remove
    barriers
  • Celebration of successes, however small

19
STEP 3 Review and Research
  • Statewide best practice inquiry
  • Eleven parent focus groups conducted across the
    State, including Leech Lake Band of Chippewa
    Reservation and MN Indian Womens Resource Center
  • NCSACW database search
  • Internet research on evidence-based practices

20
Step 4 Analyze Emergent Themes
  • Suggested Engagement Strategies
  • Family and Community Needs
  • Cultural and Regional Dynamics
  • Service Delivery Issues
  • Communication and Information Sharing
  • Exit/Transition
  • Other Barriers and Challenges

21
Lessons Learned from Parents Highlights
  • Use an approach that is collaborative, culturally
    competent, family-centered and strengths-based
  • The intervention was warranted at the time of
    occurrence in their lives however services
    and/or the way they were delivered alienated the
    parent from wanting, believing and in some cases
    succeeding in making improvements with limited
    permanency time frames.
  • The encounters with each of the systems
    discouraged the parents from admitting their need
    for recovery or seeking the services needed for
    their families to become healthy.

22
  • Parents found themselves working through a
    seemingly endless, confusing and often
    conflicting stream of rules, requirements and
    paperwork.
  • Parents continually questioned how a system that
    is designed to help families justifies separating
    the family for the purposes of treatment and
    recovery.
  • Fathers expressed
  • the need for reparation of the father-child
    relationship
  • inclusion in the intervention and recovery
    process
  • acknowledgement from professionals that they are
    important in the lives of their children.

23
Step 5 Product Development
  • Best Practice Tool Kit 20 specific strategies
    identified to achieve improved outcomes for
    Minnesotas families
  • Training Plan Rolling out the tool kit at the
    county level
  • Sustainability Plan Recommendations to State
    Policy Leaders
  • Evaluation Plan Measuring success
  • Parent Partner Model includes a Parent Partner
    Handbook and Research Summary

24
Samples of the Best Practice Strategies in the
Tool Kit
  • Parent Mentors/Recovery Specialists
  • Parent mentors - work as a guide for parents
    working to enter and maintain recovery, they can
    help educate the family on child welfare
    concerns.
  • Recovery Specialists - facilitate immediate
    access to services by assisting the parent/family
    in navigating and removing barriers as it relates
    to treatment and recovery
  • Shared Family Care
  • designed to prevent out of home placement,
    allowing the entire family to be placed in a
    supervised setting while parent works on recovery
  • Family Dependency Treatment Court
  • Court based system combining criminal and
    juvenile protection matters to quickly identify
    and assess parental AOD issues with frequent
    court supervision.

25
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • training and client-centered, directive method
    for enhancing self-motivation to change by
    exploring and resolving ambivalence thus better
    engaging the parent in the treatment and recovery
    process.
  • Wellbriety - Culture of Healing
  • culturally specific training that applies the
    traditions of the American Indian culture to the
    healing and recovery from AOD issues.
  • Father specific case planning
  • includes engagement and retention of fathers in
    services and case planning needs.
  • Individualized AOD Services for Children
  • Developmentally appropriate interventions to
    address individual needs, based on comprehensive
    assessment

26
Next Steps Implementation
  • Training Plan Implementation
  • Cross Systems Training Plan
  • October Kick off Conference
  • Implement best practice strategies at the local
    level with state technical assistance
  • Direct support and assistance to Mentor and Phase
    I Teams
  • Sustainability Plan
  • Improve communication and data sharing
  • Support best practices
  • Develop performance measurements and follow for
    trends to

27
  • Implement Evaluation Plan
  • Provides framework and sets out strategies for
    the systemic collection of information both
    regionally and statewide
  • Is MN reaching intended outcomes and
    implementation goals with respect to families
    with co-occurring issues related to chemical
    health and child welfare?
  • Developed in collaboration with the NCSACW,
    DHS-SSIS and Policy Coordinator, planning and
    programs supervisor, chemical health, Courts and
    a community stakeholder
  • Design Information technology supports (SACWIS)
    to document and support services while providing
    ongoing feedback about outcomes
  • State guidance on continual practice and system
    improvements

28
Closing Thoughts on Successful Project
Collaboration
  • Be Patient
  • Not every step is a success
  • Celebrate
  • Any and all progress should be acknowledged
  • Engage
  • Enlist the energy and wisdom of all
  • Be Consistent
  • Use a parallel process based on mutually agreed
    upon principles
  • Nurture all relationships with compassion and
    honesty to build trust and confidence

29
Further Information
  • Childrens Justice Initiative
  • http//www.courts.state.mn.us/page/?pageID197sub
    SitechildrensJustice
  • Shared Values and Principals document
  • Summary of Parent Partner Focus Groups
  • Research Report on Parent Mentor/Leader Models
  • CJI-AOD Project Members
  • Jackie Crow Shoe, Social Service Program
    Consultant
  • DHS-Child Safety and Permanency Division
  • (651)431-4676 jackie.crowshoe_at_state.mn.us
  • Carole Johnson, CJI Project Specialist
  • Supreme Court Administrators Office
  • (651)296-2269 carole.johnson_at_courts.state.mn.us
  • Deborah Moses, Operations Manager
  • DHS-Chemical Health Division
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Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with Families Minnesota's Experience with the NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance

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Title: Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with Families Minnesota's Experience with the NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance


1
Defining Collaborative Outcomes for Working with
Families Minnesota's Experience with the
NCSACW Program of In-Depth Technical Assistance
  • Presenters
  • Jackie Crow Shoe, MN DHS Child Safety and
    Permanency Division
  • Deb Moses, DHS/Chemical Health Division
  • Carole Johnson, Minnesota Judicial Branch
  • Kari Earle, National Center for Substance Abuse
    and Child Welfare

2
Presentation Objectives
  • Developing a collaboration between government
    agencies
  • Developing practical products to meet community
    needs
  • Integrating AOD services into existing systems
  • Sharing lessons learned from parents

3
Childrens Justice Initiative
  • A collaborative project between MN DHS and MN
    Judicial Branch to improve the processing and
    outcomes of child protection cases
  • Mission To ensure that, in a fair and timely
    manner, abused and neglected children involved in
    the juvenile protection court system have safe,
    stable, permanent families.

4
Key Features
  • Seen through the eyes of a child
  • Role of judge in managing case
  • Importance of Permanency
  • Timelines as a priority
  • Integrated statewide

5
CJI-AOD Project
  • Under the umbrella of the Minnesotas Childrens
    Justice Initiative
  • NCSACW In-Depth Technical Assistance
  • Project Team
  • State Advisory Committee
  • Core Team
  • courts, child safety, chemical health, county,
    parents, community provider
  • Pilot Counties
  • Mentor Counties - Itasca, Stearns
  • Ten Phase I Counties
  • Tribal engagement and involvement

6
CJI-AOD Project
  • Seen as a priority because of the nature of
    addiction and recovery related to child safety,
    well being and permanency needs
  • Five Clocks highlight challenge of competing
    timelines

7
The Mission of CJI-AOD
  • To ensure that, in a fair and timely manner,
    abused and neglected children involved in
    juvenile protection court have safe, stable,
    permanent families by improving parental and
    family recovery from alcohol or other drug
    problems.

8
Minnesotas Context
  • Total Population over 5 million Child Population
    1.3 million
  • State Supervised County Administered Child
    Welfare System
  • Primarily locally funded
  • Governed by Reporting of Maltreatment to Minors
    Act 626.556
  • 18-19,000 reports per year are accepted for a CP
    response
  • Almost half of all reports are made by school
    personnel and law enforcement Regardless of
    response path
  • Disproportionately involves poor, single mothers
    and their children and families of color
  • MN CPS objectives
  • respond proportionately to the severity of the
    safety concern
  • enhance family engagement
  • promote early intervention and prevention
  • broaden community involvement

9
  • Differential Response System
  • 57.5 received family assessment 42.5 an
    investigation
  • Substantiation rate is 56 of all investigations
  • Consolidated Chemical Dependency Treatment Fund
  • 28,000 public pay clients
  • State funded County Administered with a 15
    match
  • Free market treatment system
  • Majority of child maltreatment being addressed is
    for neglect (65)

10
  • Families who neglected more likely to experience
    multiple family issues, including alcohol and
    other drug issues and poverty.
  • Approximately 1/3 of all families receive
    services.
  • AOD concerns are seen in over half of families
    needing services.
  • Only 11 of all CP interventions result in a
    Juvenile Protection Court Intervention of
    placement out of the home.

11
MN Differential Response Continuum
  • Family Assessment
  • Response for less serious cases
  • No determination of maltreatment
  • Comprehensive
  • Strength-based community-focused
  • Enhances Family Stability
  • Focus is on safety through engagement
  • Investigation
  • Response for substantial child endangerment cases
  • Did maltreatment occur?
  • Are Child Protective Services Needed?
  • Incident based with a focus on fact finding
  • Forensic in nature coordinated with law
    enforcement
  • May be perceived as intrusive and adversarial by
    family

12
The Five Clocks
  • MFIP
  • Child welfare system
  • Recovery process
  • Child development
  • Agency and staff timelines

13
Clock Three The Recovery Process
  • Often takes longer than substance abuse treatment
    funding allows.
  • Good outcomes are contingent on adequate length
    of treatment. This may be incompatible with child
    welfare deadlines.
  • The recovery timetable can be summarized as one
    day at a time, for the rest of your life.

14
CJI-AOD The Why and How
  • Now, more than ever, system collaboration is
    needed to improve outcomes for children
  • Achieving Better Outcomes
  • Important for personal growth, healthy emotional
    development, and positive sustained relationships
    of family members
  • Can reduce future child safety concerns
  • Can reduce treatment recidivism
  • Can reduce broader community consequences related
    to capacity, resources and cost

15
STEP 1 Using the 10-Element Framework to Set
Priorities and Objectives
  • Earlier engagement of parents in assessment,
    treatment and recovery
  • Improved practice through cross-system
    collaboration
  • Increased flexibility in individualized planning
    and treatment services
  • Improved training on overlap impact of AOD and
    Child Welfare concerns

16
STEP 2 Establishing Shared Values and
Principles
  • Accountability agencies cooperate and
    collaborate in order to establish the best
    outcomes
  • Partnerships actively involve families and
    communities in decision-making and solution
    building
  • Service Delivery assure fair and equitable
    access to early and effective interventions along
    the continuum of care
  • System Resources dedicate staff and resources to
    assist with implementation of project
    recommendations

17
Cross-System Practice Focus
  • Acknowledge deficits but focus on identifying
    family competence and seek to re-create the
    circumstances that allow competence to flourish.
  • Collaboration between the systems and the
    family increases the likelihood of finding
    solutions.
  • Choices made by the family are more likely to be
    implemented than choices made without their
    collaboration.

18
  • Success is a result of respectful interactions
    which recognize family competence, family choice
    and are demonstrated by
  • Respect and honesty
  • Fairness and equity
  • Solution-focused mutual accountability
  • Clear and transparent communication
  • Active mobilization of resources to remove
    barriers
  • Celebration of successes, however small

19
STEP 3 Review and Research
  • Statewide best practice inquiry
  • Eleven parent focus groups conducted across the
    State, including Leech Lake Band of Chippewa
    Reservation and MN Indian Womens Resource Center
  • NCSACW database search
  • Internet research on evidence-based practices

20
Step 4 Analyze Emergent Themes
  • Suggested Engagement Strategies
  • Family and Community Needs
  • Cultural and Regional Dynamics
  • Service Delivery Issues
  • Communication and Information Sharing
  • Exit/Transition
  • Other Barriers and Challenges

21
Lessons Learned from Parents Highlights
  • Use an approach that is collaborative, culturally
    competent, family-centered and strengths-based
  • The intervention was warranted at the time of
    occurrence in their lives however services
    and/or the way they were delivered alienated the
    parent from wanting, believing and in some cases
    succeeding in making improvements with limited
    permanency time frames.
  • The encounters with each of the systems
    discouraged the parents from admitting their need
    for recovery or seeking the services needed for
    their families to become healthy.

22
  • Parents found themselves working through a
    seemingly endless, confusing and often
    conflicting stream of rules, requirements and
    paperwork.
  • Parents continually questioned how a system that
    is designed to help families justifies separating
    the family for the purposes of treatment and
    recovery.
  • Fathers expressed
  • the need for reparation of the father-child
    relationship
  • inclusion in the intervention and recovery
    process
  • acknowledgement from professionals that they are
    important in the lives of their children.

23
Step 5 Product Development
  • Best Practice Tool Kit 20 specific strategies
    identified to achieve improved outcomes for
    Minnesotas families
  • Training Plan Rolling out the tool kit at the
    county level
  • Sustainability Plan Recommendations to State
    Policy Leaders
  • Evaluation Plan Measuring success
  • Parent Partner Model includes a Parent Partner
    Handbook and Research Summary

24
Samples of the Best Practice Strategies in the
Tool Kit
  • Parent Mentors/Recovery Specialists
  • Parent mentors - work as a guide for parents
    working to enter and maintain recovery, they can
    help educate the family on child welfare
    concerns.
  • Recovery Specialists - facilitate immediate
    access to services by assisting the parent/family
    in navigating and removing barriers as it relates
    to treatment and recovery
  • Shared Family Care
  • designed to prevent out of home placement,
    allowing the entire family to be placed in a
    supervised setting while parent works on recovery
  • Family Dependency Treatment Court
  • Court based system combining criminal and
    juvenile protection matters to quickly identify
    and assess parental AOD issues with frequent
    court supervision.

25
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • training and client-centered, directive method
    for enhancing self-motivation to change by
    exploring and resolving ambivalence thus better
    engaging the parent in the treatment and recovery
    process.
  • Wellbriety - Culture of Healing
  • culturally specific training that applies the
    traditions of the American Indian culture to the
    healing and recovery from AOD issues.
  • Father specific case planning
  • includes engagement and retention of fathers in
    services and case planning needs.
  • Individualized AOD Services for Children
  • Developmentally appropriate interventions to
    address individual needs, based on comprehensive
    assessment

26
Next Steps Implementation
  • Training Plan Implementation
  • Cross Systems Training Plan
  • October Kick off Conference
  • Implement best practice strategies at the local
    level with state technical assistance
  • Direct support and assistance to Mentor and Phase
    I Teams
  • Sustainability Plan
  • Improve communication and data sharing
  • Support best practices
  • Develop performance measurements and follow for
    trends to

27
  • Implement Evaluation Plan
  • Provides framework and sets out strategies for
    the systemic collection of information both
    regionally and statewide
  • Is MN reaching intended outcomes and
    implementation goals with respect to families
    with co-occurring issues related to chemical
    health and child welfare?
  • Developed in collaboration with the NCSACW,
    DHS-SSIS and Policy Coordinator, planning and
    programs supervisor, chemical health, Courts and
    a community stakeholder
  • Design Information technology supports (SACWIS)
    to document and support services while providing
    ongoing feedback about outcomes
  • State guidance on continual practice and system
    improvements

28
Closing Thoughts on Successful Project
Collaboration
  • Be Patient
  • Not every step is a success
  • Celebrate
  • Any and all progress should be acknowledged
  • Engage
  • Enlist the energy and wisdom of all
  • Be Consistent
  • Use a parallel process based on mutually agreed
    upon principles
  • Nurture all relationships with compassion and
    honesty to build trust and confidence

29
Further Information
  • Childrens Justice Initiative
  • http//www.courts.state.mn.us/page/?pageID197sub
    SitechildrensJustice
  • Shared Values and Principals document
  • Summary of Parent Partner Focus Groups
  • Research Report on Parent Mentor/Leader Models
  • CJI-AOD Project Members
  • Jackie Crow Shoe, Social Service Program
    Consultant
  • DHS-Child Safety and Permanency Division
  • (651)431-4676 jackie.crowshoe_at_state.mn.us
  • Carole Johnson, CJI Project Specialist
  • Supreme Court Administrators Office
  • (651)296-2269 carole.johnson_at_courts.state.mn.us
  • Deborah Moses, Operations Manager
  • DHS-Chemical Health Division
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