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Before the sessions starts, please go to Tools > Audio > Audio set up wizard

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Title: Before the sessions starts, please go to Tools > Audio > Audio set up wizard


1
Welcome
  • Before the sessions starts, please go to Tools gt
    Audio gt Audio set up wizard
  • to check your connection

2
Developing digital literacies review, reportback
and prospects
  • Helen Beetham, Consultant
  • JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme
  • 30 August 2013

3
Questions for today
  • What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • How is the digital literacy agenda changing
    cultures and practices (in UK universities and
    colleges)?
  • What can we still do with digital literacy as
    an idea and as a long-term project?

4
Developing Digital Literacies programme
A two-year programme (2011-13) promoting and
exploring coherent, inclusive and holistic
institutional strategies and approaches for
developing digital literacies in UK further and
higher education University of Greenwich
University of the Arts London University of
Exeter Coleg Llandrillo University of
Plymouth University of Reading University
of Bath University College
London Oxford Brookes University Cardiff
University Worcester College
Institute of Education Plus ten sector bodies
ALDinHE, ALT, AUA, HEDG, ODHE, SCAP, SCONUL, SDF,
SEDA, Vitae bit.ly/pHxQnS jiscdiglit
5
What has digital literacy come to mean?
Learning Literacies for a Digital Age
Communications Act (OfCom) media literacy
Developing Digital Literacy
SCONUL 7 pillars info literacy
ECDL
Networked Nation
Netiquette
DigEULit
1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
6
What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • focus on practices and identities
  • devices, apps and services in the hands of
    learners
  • students developing hybrid practices of their own
  • data, communications, techno-social practices
    (device-neutral)
  • often informally acquired, emergent,
    differentiated, personal, piecemeal, reactive,
    adaptive...
  • focus on access and skills
  • institutional / business systems
  • passed on from specialists to students
  • computers as distinct objects of knowledge
  • formally acquired, testable, standardised

7
What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • what parallel (educational, digital) agendas have
    emerged over the same time frame?

8
What has digital literacy come to mean?
9
What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • understanding of computer characteristics,
    capabilities and applications, as well as an
    ability to implement this knowledge in the
    skillful and productive use of computer
    applications 1987
  • functional access to hardware and software,
    networks and data
  • acquired through training and practice
  • requires regular extending and updating
  • can be standardised and tested
  • an entitlement 'one size (is available to) all'

10
What has digital literacy come to mean?
11
What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • the practices that underpin effective learning
    and scholarship in a digital age 2009
  • in the context of academic disciplines
    (differentiated)
  • an aspect of emerging identity
  • require a confident but also a critical attitude
    to ICT
  • creative/productive as well as
    critical/assimilative
  • both formal and informal (and blur these
    boundaries)
  • emerge in meaningful activities

12
Developing digital literacies a model
'I am...' 'I do...' 'I can...' 'I have...'
specialised enhancement general entitle
ment
Beetham and Sharpe 2010
13
Digital literacy the elements
14
Digital literacy the turbulence
  • academic and professional learning
  • digital know-how

15
What has digital literacy come to mean?
  • in what ways is digital literacy a mainstream
    agenda for your institution?
  • in what ways is it a turbulent agenda?

16
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
17
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Ensured digital issues are on the agenda in many
locations and in new partnerships
student union
learning development
careers
SMT
accessibility
library
RKT
e-learning
estates
staff / ed development
marketing
IT dept
curriculum teams
18
Where is digital literacy located in your
institution?
  • vote
  • library
  • ICT/e-learning team
  • distributed across several areas, well connected
  • specialist digital literacy project or initiative
  • nobody knows

19
What is your institution doing...
... to ensure digital literacy is on the
agenda in many locations? ... to develop
partnerships and join up thinking?
20
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
New graduate attributes / aspirations
a digitally literate learner is flexible and
reflective, confident and capable of selecting
appropriate tools and software for
effective scholarship and research (Lpool) a
confident, agile adopter of a range of
technologies for personal, academic and
professional use (Oxford Brookes
University) confident users of advanced
technologies... exploiting the rich sources of
connectivity digital working allows (Wolverhampton
University) to be effective global citizens and
interact in a networked society (Leeds
Metropolitan University)
21
What is your institution doing?
New graduate attributes / aspirations
Does your university/college make any statements
about how students will develop their digital
capabilities, confidence, identity?
22
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Focus on technologies in the hands of learners
  • We have shown that personal devices/services can
    be used effectively for educational ends
    (including in FE settings)
  • ... but this requires infrastructure, know-how,
    clear policies, structured activities, model
    behaviours and more.

23
Bring your own device??
  • .Our evidence is there is some way to go in terms
    of infrastructure (e.g. device-neutral data
    environment, robust networks)
  • And even further to go in terms of culture
  • communicating with staff/students about
    effective digital practice
  • measures to minimise disadvantage
  • curriculum change
  • valuing and rewarding digital know-how in
    courses, departments, services
  • Where is your institution up to?

24
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Digital identity work
  • Outside of the curriculum employability, digital
    CV/portfolio building, use of social media,
    embedded into co-curricular awards
  • In the curriculum progressing towards making
    aspects of learning more public, exploring
    professional identity
  • For staff digital and open scholarship, managing
    scholarly reputation
  • For institutions staff/student work and course
    materials as branding?
  • Digital identity has been the best hook for
    engaging individuals!

25
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Digital identity work
26
What is your institution doing..
... to recognise digital identity and reputation
as key assets for students?
... to develop its own digital identity and brand
(in collaboration with staff and students)?
27
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Understanding how students develop digital
know-how
28
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Understanding how students develop digital
know-how
  • Students digital practices are contextualised in
    programmes of study tutors and peers are
    important models and guidesThey are hybrid
    institutional/personal, formal/informal,
    public/private
  • Induction and structured progression for complex
    systems that support specialised
    (academic/professional) activities e.g. data
    analysis, reference management, institutional
    systems, design, GIS...
  • Generic apps, services etc readily adopted but
    students need clear guidance on what is
    available, supported, recommended, allowed
  • Opportunities for peer support e.g. groupwork,
    mentoring, student-authored resources (videos,
    animations, apps etc)

29
What is your institution doing...
... to support the ways students develop?
30
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Students as change agents
31
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Students as change agents
  • From aspiration to core activity, national
    network
  • Variety of student roles emerging researchers,
    ambassadors, designers/developers,
    representatives and champions
  • Personal development - digital, organisational,
    personal and entrepreneurial skillsBetter
    solutions to problems thanks to direct user
    involvementMore agile, innovative approach
    (university solutions are not cool)
  • No stake in status quo able to ask questions and
    push for answersCost effective high commitment
    and output
  • Academic/professional expertise plus students
    digital know-how

32
What is your institution doing...
... to support students as change agents in
learning/teaching?
www.hei-flyers.org/wordpress/
33
What has digital literacy achieved as an agenda?
Curriculum change?
34
Curriculum change the aspiration
  • ICT/Computer Literacy the ability to adopt,
    adapt and use digital devices, applications and
    services in pursuit of scholarly and educational
    goals.
  • Information Literacy the ability to find,
    interpret, evaluate, manipulate, share and record
    information, especially scholarly and educational
    information
  • Media Literacy the ability to critically read
    and creatively produce academic and professional
    communications in a range of media.
  • Communication and Collaboration the ability to
    participate in digital networks and working
    groups of scholarship, research and learning
  • Learning Skills the ability to study and learn
    effectively in technology-rich environments,
    formal and informal
  • Digital scholarship the ability to participate
    in emerging academic, professional and research
    practices that depend on digital systems

activities and resources bit.ly/DLstaffdev
35
Curriculum change the reality
  • Many excellent examples from programmes of study
  • Staff-student partnerships often effective
  • More extensive use of digital technologies leads
    to more critical, discriminatory approach by
    students and better judgement
  • but
  • Student digital know-how seen with more concern
    than excitement
  • Innovators may be in under-valued positions and
    roles
  • Staff have no time to innovate / students can be
    conservative
  • Profound changes - borderless or flipped
    classroom, open and public pedagogies, student as
    producer - are highly challenging

36
Digital literacy the turbulence...
  • academic and professional learning
  • digital know-how

37
Time for some discussion
38
What can we still do with digital literacy as
an idea and as a long-term project?
  • As individuals developing in an intensively
    digital environment?
  • As individuals and groups of people working in
    education (committed to enabling other people to
    thrive)?
  • As organisations in need of (radical) change?

39
What can we still do with digital literacy as
an idea and as a long-term project?
  • Tunde Varga-Atkins, University of Liverpool
  • Marianne Sheppard, JISC Infonet
  • Lindsay Jordan, University of the Arts, London
  • Julian Prior, Southampton Solent University

40
Digital Literacies at ALT-C 2013
Extending CMALT to a range of staff groups 11 Sept 1.45pm Gallery 2 Clive Young and Stefanie Anyadi (UCL) The Digital Department
Engaging with new e-learning change agents Clive Young and Stefanie Anyadi (UCL) The Digital Department
Why it's not all about the learner a sociomaterial account of students' digital literacy practices 11 Sept 11.35am Main Theatre Lesley Gourlay and Martin Oliver (IOE) Digital Literacy as a Postgraduate Attribute
Raising the profile of technology use amongst learners Taking control of digital literacy development 10 Sept 3.00pm CS4 Stuart Redhead (Exeter) COLLABORATE

41
Some resources
  • ALT newsletters and webinars
  • JISC webinars
  • Design studio bit.ly/JISCDDL
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