Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some, AND Few: Using Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some, AND Few: Using Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 69a7d7-NDU0Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some, AND Few: Using Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes

Description:

Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some, AND Few: Using Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes Steve Kukic, PhD – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:57
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 79
Provided by: Joanna143
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some, AND Few: Using Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes


1
Building the Context of Excellence for All, Some,
AND FewUsing Response to Intervention (RtI) as
a Catalyst for Improving Outcomes
  • Steve Kukic, PhD
  • VP, Strategic Initiatives
  • Cambium Learning
  • stevan.kukic_at_voyagerlearning.com

2
(No Transcript)
3
Lets Get Serious!A Blog on www.rtinetwork.org
4
Always do right. This will gratify some
people and astonish the rest.
Mark Twain
5
  • We can, whenever we choose, successfully teach
    all children whose schooling is of interest to
    us. We already know more than we need to do that.
    Whether or not we do it must finally depend on
    how we feel about the fact that we havent so far.

Ron Edmonds, 1982
6
(No Transcript)
7
THE THREE CONSTANTS
  • CHANGE
  • PRINCIPLES
  • CHOICE

8
Change is good.
You go first!
Judy Elliott, 2004
9
Policy is not based on research. Policy is based
on values. Research challenges us to question
tests us to change.
Barbara Keogh, 1992
10
(No Transcript)
11
THE THREE CONSTANTS
  • CHANGE
  • PRINCIPLES
  • CHOICE

12
The Truth Part 1
  • Every organization is perfectly aligned for the
    results it gets.

13
The Truth Part 2
  • Every person is perfectly aligned for the results
    he/she gets.

14
SEE
DO
GET
15
Covey, 2004
16
New Paradigm of Change
  • Lesson 1 You cant mandate what matters. The
    more complex the change, the less you can force
    it.
  • Lesson 2 Change is a Journey, not a Blueprint.
    Change is non-linear, loaded with uncertainty and
    excitement and sometimes perverse.
  • Lesson 3 Problems are our friend. Problems are
    inevitable and you cant learn without them.
  • Lesson 4 Vision and strategic planning come
    later Premature visions and planning blind.
  • Lesson 5 Individualism and collectivism must
    have equal power. There are no one-sided
    solutions to isolation and groupthink.
  • Lesson 6 Neither centralization nor
    decentralization works. Both top-down and
    bottom-up strategies are necessary.
  • Lesson 7 Connection with the wider environment
    is critical for success. The best organizations
    learn externally as well as internally.
  • Lesson 8 Every Person is in a change agent.
    Change is too important to leave to the experts.
    Personal mind set and mastery are the ultimate
    protection.

Fullan, 1993
17
Complex Change Lessons
  1. Moral purpose is complex and problematic.
  2. Theories of change and theories of education need
    each other.
  3. Conflict and diversity are friends
  4. Understand the meaning of operating on the edge
    of chaos.
  5. Emotional intelligence is anxiety provoking and
    anxiety containing.
  6. Collaborative cultures are anxiety provoking and
    anxiety containing.
  7. Attack incoherence Connectedness and knowledge
    creation are critical.
  8. There is no single solution Craft your own
    theories and actions by being a critical
    consumer.

Fullan, 1999
18
It Takes a Whole Village
To Raise a Child
19
How many children does it take to raze a village?
Williams, 1992
20
Desegregation will break down the legal barriers
and bring men together physically, but something
must touch the hearts and souls of men so that
they will come together spiritually because it is
natural and rightTrue integration will be
achieved by true neighbors who are willingly
obedient to unenforceable obligations.
Dr. Martin Luther King
21
A New Definition for Inclusion
  • Inclusion is a shared value which promotes a
    single system of education dedicated to ensuring
    that all students are empowered to become caring,
    competent, and contributing citizens in an
    integrated, changing, and diverse society.

22
8 New Lessons for Complex Change
Lesson 1 Give up the idea that the pace of
change will slow down. Lesson 2 Coherence
making is a never-ending proposition and is
everyones responsibility. Lesson 3 Changing
context is the focus. Lesson 4 Premature
clarity is a dangerous thing. Lesson 5 The
publics thirst for transparency is
irreversible. Lesson 6 You cant get
large-scale reform through bottom-up
strategiesbeware of the trap. Lesson 7
Mobilize the social attractorsmoral purpose,
quality relationships, quality
knowledge. Lesson 8 Charismatic leadership is
negatively associated with sustainability.
Fullan, 2003
23
Raise the Bar Close the GapWITH A VENGEANCE!
A deliberate strategy
Fullan, 2003
24
Critical Change Agents
  • Knowledge and skills
  • A plan of action
  • Strategies to overcome setbacks
  • A high sense of confidence
  • Monitoring progress
  • A commitment to achieve
  • Social and environmental support
  • Freedom, control, or choice

Hattie in Fullan, 2010
25
Elements of a Successful ReformAll Systems Go!
  1. A small number of ambitious goals
  2. A guiding coalition at the top
  3. High standards and expectations
  4. Collective capacity building with a focus on
    instruction
  5. Individual capacity building linked to
    instruction
  6. Mobilizing the data as a strategy for improvement
  7. Intervention in a nonpunitive manner
  8. Being vigilant about distractors
  9. Being transparent, relentless, and increasingly
    challenging

Fullan, 2010
26
If it works, dont break it. If it doesnt work,
break the sucker!
Kukic, 1993
27
(No Transcript)
28
WHAT SCHOOLS CAN DO FOR STUDENTS AT RISK
29
Characteristics of Effective Schools
30
  • The single greatest determinant of learning is
    not socioeconomic factors or funding levels.
  • It is instruction.
  • A bone-deep, institutional acknowledgement
    of this fact continues to elude us.

Schmoker, 2006
31
A fundamental responsibility of teachers is to
create and sustain conditions that will promote
learning for each and all of their students. They
assume that every student is capable of learning.
This is both a pedagogical and moral imperative.
To meet this responsibility, teachers plan,
decide, create, and reflect on conditions of
learning. The basic learning conditions include
motivation and encouragement, knowledge of
subject matter, opportunity to learn, time,
space, appropriate curricular materials, clear
instruction, and methods of measuring student
learning progress. Goodlad, Moral Dimension pg.
261
32
Instructional Design Questions
  1. What will I do to establish and communicate
    learning goals, track student progress, and
    celebrate success?
  2. What will I do to help students effectively
    interact with new knowledge?
  3. What will I do to help students practice and
    deepen their understanding of new knowledge?
  4. What will I do to help students generate and test
    hypotheses about new knowledge?
  5. What will I do to engage students?
  6. What will I do to establish or maintain classroom
    rules and procedures?
  7. What will I do to recognize and acknowledge
    adherence and lack of adherence to classroom
    rules and procedures?
  8. What will I do to establish and maintain
    effective relationships with students?
  9. What will I do to communicate high expectations
    for all students?
  10. What will I do to develop effective lessons
    organized into a cohesive unit?

Marzano, 2007
33
Socio Economic Status may create a problem, but
it doesnt prohibit the solution.
Dr. Larry Tihen, 2008
34
  • Teaching had 6 to 10 times as much impact on
    achievement as all other factors combined.

Mortimore Sammons, 1987
35
The Stretch Culture
  • The Professional Learning Community model is
    based on the premise that all student benefit
    when placed in a challenging and supportive
    environment. The staff of a Professional Learning
    Community attempts to create a culture that
    stretches all students beyond their comfort zone
    and then provides the support to help them be
    successful in meeting the challenge.

DuFour, et al., 2004
36
RtI Questions for Discussion
  1. How would outcomes and practice be affected if we
    made educational decisions based on student
    outcome data vs. tradition?
  2. What would happen if we focused our school reform
    efforts on the needs of students at risk rather
    than on the needs of students who dont need
    effective instruction to learn proficiently?
  3. How important is the context of school structure
    for intervention success?
  4. What should be the balance between academic and
    behavioral intervention?
  5. Whats your action plan for RtI?

37
The Findings
  1. Districts had the courage to acknowledge poor
    performance and the will to seek solutions.
  2. Districts put in place a systemwide approach to
    improving instructionone that articulated
    curricular content and provided instructional
    supports.
  3. Districts instilled visions that focused on
    student learning and guided instructional
    improvement.
  4. Districts made decisions based on data, not
    instinct.
  5. Districts adopted new approaches to professional
    development that involved a coherent and
    district-organized set of strategies to improve
    instruction.
  6. Districts redefined leadership roles.
  7. Districts committed to sustaining reform over the
    long haul.

Beyond Islands of Excellence, Learning First
Alliance, 2003
38
The 4 Roles of Leadership
39
Context is everything!
Donnalyn Anton, LAUSD, 2007
40
THE THREE CONSTANTS
  • CHANGE
  • PRINCIPLES
  • CHOICE

41
Wisdom
  • In theory, there is no difference between theory
    and practice.
  • In practice, there is.

Yogi Berra
42
  • It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly
    are,
  • far more than our abilities.
  • Professor Albus Dumbledore
  • Headmaster, Hogwarts School of Magic

43
  • Brick walls are there to stop the people who
    dont want it badly enough.

Randy Pausch, 2006
44
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity All, Some, AND Few as the
consistent focus One child at a time,
instructional decisions based on progress
monitoring data Systems change with coherence to
Close The Achievement Gap
45
(No Transcript)
46
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement
47
Bonding
  • Bonding depends upon everyone being bound to a
    set of shared purposes, ideas, and ideals that
    reflect their needs, interests, and beliefs.

Sergiovanni, 2000
48
40 Developmental AssetsSearch Institute
www.search-institute.org
External Assets
Internal Assets
  1. Family support
  2. Positive family communication
  3. Other adult relationships
  4. Caring neighborhood
  5. Caring school climate
  6. Parent involvement in schooling
  7. Community values youth
  8. Youth given useful roles
  9. Service to others
  10. Safety
  11. Family boundaries
  12. School boundaries
  13. Neighborhood boundaries
  14. Adult role models
  15. Positive peer influence
  16. High expectations
  17. Creative activities
  18. Youth programs
  19. Religious community
  1. Achievement motivation
  2. School engagement
  3. Homework
  4. Bonding to school
  5. Reading for pleasure
  6. Caring
  7. Equality and social justice
  8. Integrity
  9. Honesty
  10. Responsibility
  11. Restraint
  12. Planning and decision-making
  13. Interpersonal competence
  14. Cultural competence
  15. Resistance skills
  16. Peaceful conflict resolution
  17. Personal control
  18. Self-esteem
  19. Sense of purpose

49
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity
50
Is your school really a PLC?
  • Four Critical questions
  • What is it we want all students to learnby grade
    level, by course, and by unit of instruction?
  • How will we know when each student has acquired
    the intended knowledge and skills?
  • How will we respond when students experience
    initial difficulty so that we can improve upon
    current levels of learning?
  • How will we respond when students learn more
    quickly than we expect?

DuFour, et al., 2004
51
Appropriate Interventions are Key
  1. Is our response based upon INTERVENTION rather
    than remediation?
  2. Is our response SYSTEMATIC?
  3. Is our response TIMELY?
  4. Is our response DIRECTIVE?

DuFour, et al., 2004
52
Early Intervention Changes Reading Outcomes
5
4
3
Reading grade level (GE)
2
1
1 2 3 4
Grade level corresponding to age
Reading First Assessment Committee 2000, based on
Torgesen data
53
GRADE LEVEL TIER Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory
GRADE LEVEL TIER Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory Reading Intervention Inventory
GRADE LEVEL TIER   2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co. 2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co. 2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co. 2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co. 2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co. 2006 Sopris West - A Cambium Learning Co.
GRADE LEVEL TIER              
GRADE LEVEL TIER Phonemic Awareness Phonics Fluency Vocabulary Comprehension Progress Monitoring Screening
  1 - All              
2 - Some              
  3 - Few              
  1 - All              
2 - Some              
  3 - Few              
  1 - All            
54
(No Transcript)
55
EFFECTIVE BEHAVIOR AND INSTRUCTION SUPPORT
(EBIS) EARLY IDENTIFICATION PROCESS Tigard-Tualati
n School District, Tigard, Oregon
TEAMWORK TIMELINES EBIS teams meet fall, winter
spring to review data and make decisions about
school-wide progress. EBIS teams / Grade level
teacher teams meet monthly to review data, plan
and adjust interventions.
ALL STUDENTS RECEIVE QUALITY BEHAVIOR AND
ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION AND SUPPORT
All Students Are Screened for Additional
Instructional Needs (Fall, Winter Spring
DIBELS, DORF, TESA, ODRs, etc.)
More than 5 absences or more than 3 counseling
or discipline referrals in a 30 day period
Small Group Interventions are designed by teacher
teams with EBIS support
Interventions are further individualized
Jennifer Doolittle, ODE, 2006
56
3 Tiers of Instruction
With correct instruction, students in Tier II
will shrink to 10-15 and students in Tier III
to 5
Adapted from the Tri-Level Reading Model UT
Center for Reading Language Arts-Washington
State K-12 Reading Model
57
AR RtI Multi-dimensional Model
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
80-90
80-90
Adapted from Horner Sugai
58
Kansas Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS)
  • Student centered planning
  • Customized function-based interventions
  • Frequent progress monitoring to guide
    intervention design

Academics
Behavior
  • More intense supplemental targeted skill
    interventions
  • Customized interventions
  • Frequent progress monitoring to guide
    intervention design
  • Supplemental targeted skill interventions
  • Small groups
  • Frequent progress monitoring to guide
    intervention design
  • Supplemental targeted function-based
    interventions
  • Small groups or individual support
  • Frequent progress monitoring to guide
    intervention design
  • All students, All settings
  • Positive behavioral expectations
  • explicitly taught and reinforced
  • Consistent approach to discipline
  • Assessment system and data-based decision making
  • All students
  • Evidence-based core curriculum instruction
  • Assessment system and data-based decision making

KSDE - July 2007
59
Kansas MTSS Service Delivery Model
60
(No Transcript)
61
Florida and Heartland Three Tiered Model of
School Supports
  • Intensive, Individual Interventions
  • Individual Students
  • Assessment-based
  • Intense, durable procedures

1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
Students
Tilly, 2004
62
(No Transcript)
63
What will the future of student services look
like in Saskatchewan?
General Intensive Resources
General Supplemental Resources
Amount of Resources Needed to Solve Problem
General Resources
Intensity of Problem
64
What is Your Reality?
65
The Conundrum of Fidelity of Implementation
  • We are faced with the paradox of
  • non-evidence-based implementation
  • of evidence-based programs.

Drake, Gorman Torrey, 2002
66
RtI websites
  • www.rtinetwork.org www.ncld.org
  • www.nasdse.org
  • www.rti4success.org
  • http//ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/pdf/practiceguides/rti_
  • http//studentservices.leeschools.net/pdf/RTI20Ma
    nual-update8-27-08.pdf
  • www.kansasmtss.org
  • www.cde.state.co.us
  • http//www.florida-rti.org/
  • http//www.ade.state.az.us/schooleffectiveness
  • www.illinoisaspire.org
  • www.interventioncentral.org
  • www.easycbm.org
  • www.progressmonitoring.org
  • www.fcrr.org http//reading.uoregon.edu
  • www.centeroninstruction.org

67
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity All, Some, AND Few as the
consistent focus
68
  • We can, whenever we choose, successfully teach
    all children whose schooling is of interest to
    us. We already know more than we need to do that.
    Whether or not we do it must finally depend on
    how we feel about the fact that we havent so far.

Ron Edmonds, 1982
69
  • We do whatever it takes.

DuFour, et al., 2004
70
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity All, Some, AND Few as the
consistent focus One child at a time,
instructional decisions based on progress
monitoring data
71
The Big BIG Idea of RtI
  • Decide what is important for students to know
  • Teach what is important for students to know
  • Keep track of how students are doing
  • Make changes according to the results you collect

Dave Tilly, Heartland AEA 2005
72
  • The difference between a formative and summative
    assessment has also been described as the
    difference between a physical and an autopsy.
  • Professional Learning Communities prefer
    physicals to autopsies.

DuFour, et al., 2004
73
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity All, Some, AND Few as the
consistent focus One child at a time,
instructional decisions based on progress
monitoring data Systems change with coherence to
Close The Achievement Gap
74
(No Transcript)
75
A Call to ActionThe relentless pursuit of
excellenceThriving on CHAOS!
  • C
  • H
  • A
  • O
  • S

Collaboration with one purpose, to improve
achievement Hierarchy of tiered, effective,
academic and behavioral interventions implemented
with fidelity All, Some, AND Few as the
consistent focus One child at a time,
instructional decisions based on progress
monitoring data Systems change with coherence to
Close The Achievement Gap
76
THRIVING ON CHAOS!
  • Teaching to student success
  • High expectations
  • Realization of the potential of RtI
  • Improvement based on data
  • Validation of curricula based on student success
  • Effective interventions implemented with fidelity

77
From All students can learn, to All students
will learn!
78
Always remember, it is easier to get forgiveness
than permissionor
  • Proceed until apprehended!
About PowerShow.com