Community-Engaged Research: Combining Scientific Rigor - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Community-Engaged Research: Combining Scientific Rigor PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 69a6e6-MjU5M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Community-Engaged Research: Combining Scientific Rigor

Description:

Community-Engaged Research: Combining Scientific Rigor & Community Participation February 17, 2012 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:4
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Date added: 13 December 2019
Slides: 27
Provided by: dan
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Community-Engaged Research: Combining Scientific Rigor


1
Community-Engaged Research Combining Scientific
Rigor Community Participation
  • February 17, 2012

2
Why community-engaged research?
  • Persistence of disparities, Importance of
    local/cultural
  • context
  • Greater demand by communities for equity and
    research relevance- history of abuse/mistrust
  • Limitations of current research approaches to
    address
  • translational blocks
  • Growing appreciation of the value of
    partnerships, Community-engaged research movement

3
Some community perceptions
  • Its called Helicopter Research. They flew in,
    took our personal info, took off. We never got
    anything back.
  • The academics got a grant for reducing smoking
    but what were really concerned with is gun and
    gang violence.
  • Did they need to do that big long study to
    prove what we already knew?
  • The professor cant just walk in with the
    expectation of creating a partnership. It takes
    time to understand each other and make sure we
    wont be exploited.
  • I get calls from students every week. They want
    to interview me, have access to my clients, help
    them with a class or a paper. I dont have time.

4
What is community-engaged research?
  • Approach characterized by collaborative
    partnership development, cooperation
    negotiation, commitment to addressing local
    health issues
  • Broad spectrum
  • Some incorporate few elements of comm.
    engagement/minimal collaboration
  • others involve comm. orgs researchers as equal
    partners in all aspects of the research

5
Spectrum
6
Defining Community-Based Participatory Research
(CBPR)
  • A collaborative approach to research that
    equitably involves all partners in the research
    process and recognizes the unique strengths that
    each brings.  CBPR begins with a research topic
    of importance to the community and has the aim of
    combining knowledge with action and achieving
    social change...
  • W K Kellogg Community Health Scholars Program
  • CBPR embraces greatest degree of relationship
    building, comm. partnership collaboration

7
Principles of CBPR Maximum Engagement
  • Builds on strengths resources within community
  • Facilitates collaboration in all phases of
    research
  • Commitment to addressing local health issues
  • Brings knowledge gathering action together for
    mutual benefit of all partners
  • Academics community learn together both are
    empowered
  • Disseminates findings to all partners

Israel BA, EngE, Schulz AJ, and Parker EA eds.
(2005) Methods in community-based participatory
research for health. Jossey-Bass San Francisco,
CA
8
Community-Engaged Research What it is and isnt
  • An Orientation to research changes the role of
    researcher and researched
  • How can you tell if research is community-placed
    or community-engaged?
  • Who makes the decisions? Who holds the power?
    Choice of issue/design, gets money, owns data,
    dissemination venues
  • Not a method or set of methods
  • Typically thought of as qualitative
  • Fewer other examples, but promising
  • Goal is to influence change in community
    conditions, norms, systems, programs, policies

8
9
Benefits of Community-Engaged Research
  • Research agenda (diversity of topics)
  • Research design and delivery (tools, recruitment)
  • Research ethics (consent, ethical acceptability)
  • Impact on communities (CBOs, participants)
  • Enhancing effectiveness of interventions
  • System change outcomes (policy change,
    practice/program changes, community capacity and
    empowerment)
  • Impact on faculty
  • Impact on broader community/practice

10
Growing Legitimacy of CEnR
  • Increasing attention and visibility
  • Focus of Federal Agency working groups, evidence
    reports, summits, white papers
  • Required element in some large institute/center
    grants
  • Growing funding from federal and private funders
  • Increasing inclusion in training
  • IOM named CBPR as 1 of 8 new competencies
    recommended for all health professional students
  • Post-doctoral fellowships/Job announcements
  • Active research community
  • CBPR listserv
  • Journal articles, theme issues, reports, new
    journals

10
11
Current Reality of Partnerships
  • Community engagement buzz in higher ed/funding
    circles
  • Predominant model NOT partnership- mostly
    initiated by academics
  • Relationship btwn partners largely based on
    individuals funding- NOT institutionalized
  • Often assumption by academics/funders/policymakers
    that community groups NEED academia
  • Communities realizing their power to make the
    rules
  • Big differences between mature early
    partnerships

11
12
Community Engagement in Research Phases
  • Find partners/form team
  • Form research questions
  • Planning study
  • Conducting research
  • Analyzing data
  • Sharing findings
  • Taking action

13
Community-engaged research is not for everyone
  • Challenging
  • time-consuming- long-term relationships/commitment
  • not as many funding/publishing opportunities
  • pay for your colleagues errors
  • Not about recruitment and retention. Is about
    relationship-building

13
14
How do you find connect with partners?
  • Use your contacts- who do you already know?
  • Ask your colleagues- they can serve as mentors
  • Learn about Chicago communities- Pavement
    Google
  • Build alliances w/other academics w/similar
    interests
  • Seek assistance from CCE/ARCC

15
Figure out if these are partners you want to
work with?
  • What are you looking for in a partner? Whats the
    purpose for the partnership?
  • Get to know them
  • Honest conversation about agendas, needs, wants
  • Is this someone you want to work with/click
    with?
  • Are they interested in the same things- content
    working style?
  • What other partners/collaborators need to be at
    the table or part of the partnership?

16
Set the Stage for Healthy Partnership
  • Build trust- get to know each other, socialize,
    sweat equity, humour
  • Communicate early, well, often- which methods
    work, what language is being used
  • Allow time for decision making- how will
    decisions be made, who makes decisions, who is
    consulted, who is informed, will decision making
    responsibilities be rotated

17
Things to consider for students/faculty
  • What does it mean to do this work as a student?
  • Benefit to student, benefit to community,
    motivation
  • What are challenges for students?
  • Compressed timeline, short-term (?) relationship,
    limited mentors, lack of funding, academic
    policies
  • Do you develop new relationships as a student or
    try to work on a team with faculty or existing NU
    relationship?
  • Dont work alone- work/connect with other
    academics- locally and nationally. Find mentors.
  • Think about Graduation and Promotion Tenure
    from the beginning- document document

17
18
Learning to do this work
  • What are the skills/competencies you need to do
    this work?
  • How do you gain them?

19
Alliance for Research in Chicagoland
Communities
  • Mission Growing equitable and collaborative
    partnerships between Chicago area Communities and
    Northwestern University for Research that leads
    to measurable improvements in community health.

20
Strategic Focus Areas
21
ARCC STEERING COMMITTEE
Logan Square Neighborhood Association
Greater Humboldt Park Community of Wellness
Chicago Youth Programs
Apostolic Faith Church
Chinese Mutual Aid Association
Westside Health Authority
Healthcare Consortium of Illinois
Roberto Clemente Wildcats Student Health Center
Centro Romero
Asian Health Coalition
Coalition of Limited English Speaking Elderly
Northwestern Faculty Rebecca Ford-Paz, PhD,
Ruchi Gupta, MD MPH, Bill Healey, PT, Ed D,
GCS, Darby Morhardt MSW LCSW, Karen Sheehan MD
MPH, Melissa Simon MD MPH, David Victorson,
PhD Government Agencies Chicago Department Of
Public Health, Chicago Public Schools
Community Campus Coordinators Gina Curry
Josefina Serrato Leadership Jen Kauper-Brown,
MPH, Virginia Bishop, MD MPH, Maryann Mason, PhD
22
Diverse organizations gt Diverse Needs
23
Upcoming ARCC events
  • March 7 Town Hall Forum and Workshop on
    Collaborative Data Analysis
  • April 10 Workshop on Writing/Publishing about
    Community-Engaged Research
  • May CERC Poster Session and Keynote Presentation

24
Local Connections
  • Chicago Consortium for Community
  • Engagement
  • Chicago CBPR Network
  • http//groups.yahoo.com/group/Chicago_CBPR_Network
    /

25
Resources
  • Community-Campus Partnerships for Health
    www.ccph.info
  • Resources
  • Skill-Building Online Curriculum
    www.cbprcurriculum.info
  • Listservs
  • IRB and Ethics
  • Promotion and Tenure
  • Journal Progress in Community Health Partnerships

25
26
  • www.ARCConline.net
  • Jen Kauper-Brown, MPH
  • Director, Alliance for Research in Chicagoland
    Communities
  • 312-503-1942
  • E-mail j-kauper-brown_at_northwestern.edu
About PowerShow.com