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Jessica Ball, M.P.H., Ph.D. Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships School of Child and Youth Care University of Victoria

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Intersectoral Action for Indigenous Children s Health and Development Jessica Ball, M.P.H., Ph.D. Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Jessica Ball, M.P.H., Ph.D. Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships School of Child and Youth Care University of Victoria


1
Jessica Ball, M.P.H., Ph.D.Early
Childhood Development Intercultural
PartnershipsSchool of Child and Youth
CareUniversity of Victoria
Intersectoral Action for Indigenous Childrens
Health and Development
2
Childrens health well-being are multiply
determined
3
Coordinated action is needed across all levels
(J. Evans 2005)
4
Multiple entry points to harness the ecology of
childrens health development
  • Adapted from Bronfenbrenner (1979)

5
Key messages from researchwith First Nations in
B.C.
  • Early Childhood Care Development Programs can
    serve as a socially accessible culturally
    resonant entry point for promoting health
    delivery health services
  • Community development supports child health
    development
  • One model does not fit all contexts (no best
    practices)
  • Research helps to identify promising practices
  • Some Aboriginal communities are demonstrating
    promising community-led, community-paced,
    community-fitting practices
  • that engage recommendations
  • of the AFN, NAHO Romanow
  • Commission, Pop Health . .

6
Prevailing Individual-Centred, Fragmented
Services
Parent Good luck trying to make it to your
childs appointment with a dental hygienist
SLP Good luck trying to find the child who has
been referred for early intervention! Community-A
dmin Good luck filling out all the forms to
appeal account to many different authorities
7
Single-focus programs have limited effects
  • Nutrition programs must be combined with
    stimulation (parent coaching, preschool, play
    spaces) in order realize significant gains in
    physical growth, health, learning development
  • Programs to stimulate cognitive development do
    not have desired impacts if the child has a
    language delay due to hearing loss due to ear
    infections due to mold growing in their
    sub-standard housing in a wet climate.

8
Supporting families
  • Most families want to meet ALL of a childs many
    different kinds of needs
  • Policies service systems that require parents
    to engage many different professionals and
    programs create barriers (travel, scheduling,
    economic, organizational, social, cultural)
  • Program coordination supports family life
    increases the chances of childrens needs being
    met.

9
First Nations Early Learning Child Care Action
Plan (AFN 2005)
  • sustainable, flexible funding
  • community driven
  • Integration would empower First Nations to
    integrate child care services and programs across
    jurisdictions to create a new holistic framework
    of First Nations child care programming.

10
Coordinated programming
  • Supported by
  • Common sense
  • Ecological perspective on change
  • Population health model
  • Cultural concepts
  • Research
  • Families
  • Aboriginal recommendations
  • What more do we need to make it happen?

11
Making it happen Research in Rural First
Nations
12
Making It Happen ?Starts with long range VISION
  • Communities all had
  • VALUE that Children are our future.
  • COMMITMENT to invest in early years to create a
    foundation for adult health, achievement and
    economic security
  • HOLISTIC UNDERSTANDING
  • of health development
  • PLAN for coordinated programs
  • FUNDING
  • soft infrastructure training, policy
    development, community awareness
  • hard infrastructure buildings, equipment, buses,
    supplies
  • What is happening in these communities now?

13
From vision to action
  • ? Starts with capacity building
  • Community - University Partnerships
  • Community-based, culturally specific as well as
    mainstream training

14
Moving towards community centred, coordinated
programs with ECCD as Hook and Hub
15
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16
Features of Hub Approaches
  • Family-centred
  • Relationship-oriented (cultural safety)
  • Population-based streamed to target programs
  • Strength-focused rather than deficits oriented
  • Efficient
  • Coordinated or Consolidated funding

17
(No Transcript)
18
From Dreams to Reality at Lilwat Nation
Mount Currie, B.C. 140 km NW of Vancouver, near
Whistler
19
Supporting childrens health development where
they are . .
20
On their traditional territories . . .
21
In their community . . .
Pqusnalhcw multi-service community centre Opened
May, 1999
22
In the families they have . . .
23
Partnership to develop community capacity
  • Training UVic partnership
  • Incremental implementation
  • Starting with child care as a hook
  • Community kitchen cultural events
  • bringing Elders to the centre
  • Incremental addition of programs services
  • Creative work to push the envelope
  • with funders agencies

24
Planned Integration, Coordination, Co-location

25
From child care community kitchento.
  • Child development pre-school after-school
  • Drumming, dancing, pow wow
  • Supported Child Care (special needs)
  • Uscalmicts language immersion/exposure
  • Early Intervention Therapists (SLP, OT, PT,
    dental hygienist)
  • Family Wellness Worker
  • Community Health Representatives
  • Community Health Nurse
  • Paediatrician
  • Counsellors (NNADAP Residential School)
  • Dentist
  • Chiropractor
  • Elders Activity
  • Coordinator
  • Home Care Nursing
  • Child welfare

26
Working together learning across professional
disciplines services
A mutually supportive community of workers with
ongoing professional development opportunities
yields high staff retention
27
Many pathways
  • Finding our way to supporting wellness among
    diverse communities of children and families
    requires many pathways. No one approach, no one
    program model, will reach or work for everyone.
  • Meadow Lake Tribal Council Administrator
  • Local innovation resourcefulness can combine
    the right number variety of people,
    professions, services that a community wants
    needs to achieve their own ECCD goals
  • Research compare remote, rural urban hub
    potentials demonstration projects

28
Key messages from researchwith First Nations in
B.C.
  • Early Childhood Care Development Programs may
    be an especially strategic entry point for
    Aboriginal health initiatives
  • Planned ECCD training services are effective
    components of Aboriginal community development
  • One model does not fit all contexts (no best
    practices)
  • Research with Aboriginal communities can explore
    demonstrate exciting new ways to think about
    community-driven designs for action to promote
    child family health quality of life
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