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Developing Comprehensive Suicide Prevention

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Developing Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Lloyd Potter, PhD, MPH Children s Safety Network & Suicide Prevention Resource Center Education Development Center, Inc. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Developing Comprehensive Suicide Prevention


1
Developing Comprehensive Suicide Prevention
Lloyd Potter, PhD, MPH Childrens Safety Network
Suicide Prevention Resource Center Education
Development Center, Inc.
2
Topics
  • Title V and Suicide Prevention
  • Implementing Evidence-Based Prevention
  • Collaboration and Integration of Suicide
    Prevention

3
Title V Block Grant National Performance Measures
  • Reducing suicide rates among 15-19 year olds

4
State Title V Performance Measures - Maine
  • The percentage of high school students (grades
    9-12) who feel like they matter to people in
    their community.
  • The percentage of elementary schools that have
    developed and implemented a comprehensive
    approach to the prevention of bullying in
    collaboration with the Maine Injury Prevention
    Program.

5
State Title V Performance Measures
  • Minnesota -The degree to which Title V programs
    enhance statewide capacity for a public health
    approach to mental health promotion and suicide
    prevention for children and adolescents.
  • Rhode Island - Percentage of students who felt so
    sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or
    more in a row that they stopped doing some usual
    activities during the past 12 months.

6
Spheres of Influence Ecological perspective of
development
Society
Community
Family/Peers
Individual
7
The Mental Health Intervention Spectrum for
mental disorders
Source Institute of Medicine. (1994). Reducing risks for mental disorders Frontiers for preventive intervention research.
8
Evidence of effective suicide prevention
interventions
  • Selective
  • Life skills (promising)
  • Small group skills (promising)
  • Managing geriatric depression (promising)
  • Indicated
  • Behavioral/cognitivebehavioral strategies
    (effective)
  • Brief psychological intervention (promising)
  • Contact through letter or telephone (promising)
  • Universal
  • Means control (promising)
  • Laws and policies (promising)
  • Public health messages (insufficient)
  • School-based interventions

    education (insufficient)
  • School-based interventions

    skills (promising)
  • Gatekeeper training (insufficient)
  • Screening (insufficient)

Adapted from Knox, K. (2006). Interventions to
prevent suicidal behavior. In Doll et al.,
Handbook of Injury Prevention.
9
SPRC Best Practices Registry www.SPRC.org
10
Delivering and adapting evidence-based programs
in communities
  • where the rubber meets the road

11
The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts
Is evidence-based programming adequate?
  • Necessary, not sufficient
  • Highly targeted focus of specific
    prevention/promotion efforts often inadequate for
    achieving mental health promotion goals
  • A more comprehensive and collaborative approach
    is needed

12
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13
Community Problem Solving Capacity
Collective Competence
Low
High
Anomic Communities LL
Detached Communities LH
Low
Shared Responsibility
Intentional Communities HL
Empowered Communities HH
High
Source Bowen, G.L., Martin, J.A., Mancini,
J.A. (1999) Communities in Blue for the 21st
Century Fairfax, VA Caliber Associates, (p.
8-9).
14
Coalition for Planning, Collaboration, and
Integration
  • Schools
  • Faith community
  • Community programs
  • Acute/Primary care
  • Mental health
  • Advocacy groups
  • Police and courts
  • Foster care
  • Child/Family protective services

15
Conclusion
  • Defining suicide prevention relate performance
    measures can help advance efforts
  • There is a growing body of information about
    evidence-based and best practices that states and
    communities can use
  • Planning, collaboration, and integration at the
    state and community level should drive suicide
    prevention and mental health promotion

16
Resources
www.SPRC.org
www.ChildrensSafetyNetwork.org
www.SPANUSA.org
www.AFSP.org
www.suicidology.org
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