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Constitutional Amendments and Supreme Court Cases

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Title: Constitutional Amendments and Supreme Court Cases


1
Constitutional Amendments and Supreme Court Cases
  • By Trevor Fisher, Ethan Callison, and Jacob Diehl

2
Important Supreme Courts Cases
3
Important Supreme Court Justices
  • Chief Justice John Marshall Marbury v. Madison
  • Chief Justice Earl Warren Brown v. Board of
    Education
  • Chief Justice Warren Burger Warrens successor
    Nixons choice
  • Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Adkins v.
    Childrens Hospital
  • Chief Justice Louis Brandeis Muller v. Oregon

4
Marbury v. Madison, 1803
  • Established Judicial Review Ability of the
    Judiciary Branch to declare a law
    unconstitutional
  • Checks and Balances of Branches Accomplished

5
McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819
  • Upheld Creation of the Bank of the United States,
    States Cannot Tax Such an Institution
  • Congress has power under the Constitution to
    incorporate a bank pursuant to the Necessary and
    Proper clause.

6
Dartmouth v. Woodward, 1819
  • New Hampshire legislature attempted to change
    Dartmouth College, a privately funded
    institution, into a state university
  • States Cannot Interfere with Business Contracts

7
Dred Scott v. Sanford, 1857
  • Dred Scott resided in a free state and claimed
    that he was a free man
  • Missouri Compromise Declared Unconstitutional,
    Slaves Are Not Citizens

8
Munn v. Illinois, 1877
  • Illinois regulated grain and elevator rates by
    establishing maximum rates for their use.
  • States Are Allowed to Interfere When Pertaining
    to Public Interest

9
Plessy v. Ferguson, 1896
  • Justice Henry Billings Brown upheld state-imposed
    racial segregation
  • States Can Enforce Segregation if Accommodations
    are Equal as well as Separate

10
Northern Securities Co. v. U.S., 1904
  • Supported Government Action Against Big
    Businesses That Restrained Trade
  • Aided Sherman Anti-Trust Act

11
Muller v. Oregon, 1908
  • Court Ruled A State Could Legislate Maximum
    Working Hours
  • Women have special attributes that should only
    allow them to ten hours of work

12
Standard Oil Co. v. U.S., 1911
  • Dissolved Standard Oil Trust because of
    Unreasonable Restraint of Trade
  • Violated Sherman Anti-Trust Act
  • Ordered Destruction of the Company

13
Schenck v. U.S., 1919
  • Upheld WWI Espionage Act
  • Draft Resistance is Clear and Present Danger

14
Adkins v. Childrens Hospital, 1923
  • Minimum wage to women and children employed in
    D.C.
  • Interference with employers ability to contract
    without assuring due process of law?
  • The statute would dangerously extend the police
    power of the state and, thus, found it
    unconstitutional

15
Schecter v. U.S., 1935
  • National Industrial Recovery Act empowered the
    President to implement industrial codes to
    regulate weekly employment hours, wages, and
    minimum ages of employees
  • Congress Can Not Delegate Its Powers to The
    President

16
Brown v. Board of Education, 1954
  • Desegregation of Schools
  • Overturned Plessy v. Ferguson
  • Segregation of public education has a negative
    effect on minority children

17
Miranda v. Arizona, 1966
  • Police Must Read The Suspect Their Miranda
    Rights Before Questioning The Suspect
  • The Court specifically outlined the necessary
    aspects of police warnings to suspects, including
    warnings of the right to remain silent and the
    right to have counsel present during
    interrogations.

18
Furman v. Georgia, 1972
  • Furman fell and gun went off, shooting resident,
    convicted of murder death penalty
  • All Death Penalties Are Unconstitutional, Unless
    They Are Rewritten

19
Roe v. Wade, 1973
  • Anti-Abortion Laws Are Unconstitutional
  • Privacy Rights of a Woman

20
University of California v. Bakke, 1978
  • Allowed to Admit Students on Basis of Race if
    Combating Discrimination
  • Affirmative Action
  • Reverse Discrimination
  • Any racial quota system supported by government
    violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • The use of race as a criterion in admissions
    decisions in higher education was
    constitutionally permissible

21
The Bill of Rights
  • The original Bill of Rights was for those who
    feared the power of the national government to
    restrict citizens rights.
  • The First 10 Amendments were all passed on
    September 25, 1789

22
The Bill Of Rights
  1. Congress shall make no law respecting an
    establishment of religion, or prohibiting the
    free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom
    of speech, or of the press, or the right of the
    people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the
    Government for a redress of grievances.

23
Bill of Rights
  • 2. A well regulated Militia, being necessary to
    the security of a free State, the right of the
    people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be
    infringed.

24
Bill of Rights
  • 3. No Soldier shall, in time of peace be
    quartered in any house, without the consent of
    the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to
    be prescribed by law.

25
Bill of Rights
  • 4. The right of the people to be secure in their
    persons, houses, papers, and effects, against
    unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be
    violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon
    probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation,
    and particularly describing the place to be
    searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

26
Bill of Rights
  • 5. No person shall be held to answer for a
    capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a
    presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except
    in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or
    in the Militia, when in actual service in time of
    War or public danger nor shall any person be
    subject for the same offence to be twice put in
    jeopardy of life or limb, nor shall be compelled
    in any criminal case to be a witness against
    himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or
    property, without due process of law nor shall
    private property be taken for public use, without
    just compensation.

27
Bill of Rights
  • 6. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused
    shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public
    trial, by an impartial jury of the State and
    district wherein the crime shall have been
    committed which district shall have been
    previously ascertained by law, and to be informed
    of the nature and cause of the accusation to be
    confronted with the witnesses against him to
    have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses
    in his favor, and to have the assistance of
    counsel for his defense.

28
Bill of Rights
  • 7. In Suits at common law, where the value in
    controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the
    right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no
    fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise
    re-examined in any Court of the United States,
    than according to the rules of the common law.

29
Bill of Rights
  • 8. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor
    excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual
    punishments inflicted.

30
Bill of Rights
  • 9. The enumeration in the Constitution of certain
    rights shall not be construed to deny or
    disparage others retained by the people.

31
Bill of Rights
  • 10. The powers not delegated to the United States
    by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the
    States, are reserved to the States respectively,
    or to the people.

32
11th Amendment
  • The Judicial power of the United States shall not
    be construed to extend to any suit in law or
    equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of
    the United States by Citizens of another State,
    or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.
  • Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified
    February 7, 1795.

33
12th Amendment
  • Created separate ballots for the president and
    Vice President.
  • Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified
    February 7, 1795.

34
13th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress December 9, 1803. Ratified
    June 15, 1804.
  • Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary
    servitude, except as a punishment for crime
    whereof the party shall have been duly convicted,
    shall exist within the United States, or any
    place subject to their jurisdiction.
  • Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce
    these article by appropriate legislation.

35
14th Amendment
  • All persons born or naturalized in the United
    States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof,
    are citizens of the United States and of the
    State wherein they reside. No State shall make or
    enforce any law which shall abridge the
    privileges or immunities of citizens of the
    United States nor shall any State deprive any
    person of life, liberty, or property, without due
    process of law nor deny to any person within its
    jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
  • Passed by Congress June 13, 1866. Ratified July
    9, 1868.

36
15th Amendment
  • Section 1. The right of citizens of the United
    States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by
    the United States or by any State on account of
    race, color, or previous condition of servitude--
  • Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to
    enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
  • Passed by Congress February 26, 1869. Ratified
    February 3, 1870.

37
16th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress July 2, 1909. Ratified
    February 3, 1913.
  • The Congress shall have power to lay and collect
    taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived,
    without apportionment among the several States,
    and without regard to any census or enumeration.

38
17th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress May 13, 1912. Ratified April
    8, 1913.
  • The Senate of the United States shall be composed
    of two Senators from each State, elected by the
    people thereof, for six years and each Senator
    shall have one vote. The electors in each State
    shall have the qualifications requisite for
    electors of the most numerous branch of the State
    legislatures.

39
18th Amendment
  • Abolished alcohol.
  • Passed by Congress December 18, 1917. Ratified
    January 16, 1919. Repealed by Amendment 21

40
19th Amendment
  • The right of citizens of the United States to
    vote shall not be denied or abridged by the
    United States or by any States on account of sex.
  • Congress shall have power to enforce this article
    by appropriate legislation.
  • Passed on August 18, 1920.

41
20th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress March 2, 1932. Ratified
    January 23, 1933.
  • Section 1. The terms of the President and the
    Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day
    of January, and the terms of Senators and
    Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January,
    of the years in which such terms would have ended
    if this article had not been ratified and the
    terms of their successors shall then begin.
  • Section 2. The Congress shall assemble at least
    once in every year, and such meeting shall begin
    at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they
    shall by law appoint a different day.
  • If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the
    term of the President, the President elect shall
    have died, the Vice President elect shall become
    President.

42
21st Amendment
  • Passed by Congress February 20, 1933. Ratified
    December 5, 1933.
  • Section 1. The eighteenth article of Amendment to
    the Constitution of the United States is hereby
    repealed.
  • Section 2. The transportation or importation into
    any State, Territory, or Possession of the United
    States for delivery or use therein of
    intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws
    thereof, is hereby prohibited.

43
22nd Amendment
  • Passed by Congress March 21, 1947. Ratified
    February 27, 1951
  • No person shall be elected to the office of the
    President more than twice

44
23rd Amendment
  • Passed by Congress June 16, 1960. Ratified March
    29, 1961.
  • The District constituting the seat of Government
    of the United States shall appoint in such manner
    as Congress may direct
  • A number of electors of President and Vice
    President equal to the whole number of Senators
    and Representatives in Congress to which the
    District would be entitled if it were a State,
    but in no event more than the least populous
    State they shall be in addition to those
    appointed by the States, but they shall be
    considered, for the purposes of the election of
    President and Vice President, to be electors
    appointed by a State and they shall meet in the
    District and perform such duties as provided by
    the twelfth article of Amendment.

45
24th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress August 27, 1962. Ratified
    January 23, 1964.
  • Section 1. The right of citizens of the United
    States to vote in any primary or other election
    for President or Vice President, for electors for
    President or Vice President, or for Senator or
    Representative in Congress, shall not be denied
    or abridged by the United States or any State by
    reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax.
  • Section 2. The Congress shall have power to
    enforce this article by appropriate legislation

46
25th Amendment
  • Passed by Congress July 6, 1965. Ratified
    February 10, 1967
  • In case of the removal of the President from
    office or of his death or resignation, the Vice
    President shall become President.

47
26th amendment
  • Passed by Congress March 23, 1971. Ratified July
    1, 1971.
  • The right of citizens of the United States, who
    are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall
    not be denied or abridged by the United States or
    by any State on account of age.

48
27th Amendment
  • Originally proposed Sept. 25, 1789. Ratified May
    7, 1992
  • No law, varying the compensation for the services
    of the Senators and Representatives, shall take
    effect, until an election of representatives
    shall have intervened
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