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Poetry Class Introduction

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Poetry Class Introduction Aiden Yeh, Ph.D. Wenzao Ursuline College of Languages Lesson Outline What Poetry is and what it is not: An Introduction How to write poetry ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Poetry Class Introduction


1
Poetry Class Introduction
  • Aiden Yeh, Ph.D.
  • Wenzao Ursuline College of Languages

2
Lesson Outline
  • What Poetry is and what it is not An
    Introduction
  • How to write poetry
  • How to read poetry
  • How to memorize poetry
  • Workshop Creating individual blogs

3
Becoming a poet
http//www.cartoonstock.com/directory/w/writing_po
etry.asp
4
http//24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m8d5tiNmDK1rt7wb
5o1_1280.jpg
5
What is Poetry?
  • Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an
    escape from emotion it is not the expression of
    personality, but an escape from personality. But,
    of course, only those who have personality and
    emotions know what it means to want to escape
    from these things. T.S. Eliot

6
Can everyone write poetry?
  • Most people ignore most poetry because most
    poetry ignores most people. 
  • Adrian Mitchell

7
Can you force it on people?
  • Ordering a man to write a poem is like commanding
    a pregnant woman to give birth to a red-headed
    child. Carl Sandburg

8
Whats the Catalyst?
  • At the touch of love everyone becomes a
    poet. Plato

9
Can you write it?
  • Poetry is a deal of joy and pain and wonder, with
    a dash of the dictionary. Kahlil Gibran

10
Can you make a living out of poetry?
  • There's no money in poetry, but there's no poetry
    in money, either. Robert Graves

11
Indeed
  • Poetry is not a profession, it is a
    destiny. Mikhail Dudan
  • Poetry isnt a profession, its a way of life.
    Its an empty basket you put your life into it
    and make something out of that. Mary Oliver

12
So why write poetry?
  • We don't read and write poetry because it's
    cute.  We read and write poetry because we are
    members of the human race.  And the human race is
    filled with passion.  And medicine, law,
    business, engineering, these are noble pursuits
    and necessary to sustain life.  But poetry,
    beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay
    alive for.  
  • from Dead Poet's Society

13
  • Poetry is all that is worth remembering in
    life.  William Hazlitt   

14
How do you write poetry
  • Poetry, unlike other literary forms, focuses most
    sharply on language itself. The music of words,
    how they sound, how their sounds flow and mix and
    form musical patterns are vital to poetry.  

15
How do you write poetry
  • Writer A.S. Rosenthal said, Far from being
    incidental, qualities of sound and rhythm give a
    poetic work its organic body.

16
  • A Silly Poem
  • Said Hamlet to Ophelia, I'll draw a sketch of
    thee, What kind of pencil shall I use? 2B or not
    2B? 
  • Spike Milligan

http//www.poemhunter.com/poem/a-silly-poem/
17
How do you write poetry
  • Poets must use all the physical attributes of
    words their sound, size, shape, and rhythms.

18
Imagery
  • If the music of poetry is its life-blood, images
    give poetry its soul.

19
  • Although you can write a successive poem without
    imagery, the best poems come alive with simile,
    metaphor, symbolism, and use of personification.

20
Imagery
  • Keep in mind that imagery is the language of
    dreams.
  • When you write with imagery you bring the magic
    and mystery of dreamscapes to your writing.
  • As poet, William Greenway, said images can
    communicate the unsayable, so show dont tell. 

21
http//b.vimeocdn.com/ts/275/710/275710786_640.jpg
22
Rhythm
  • Rhythm can be defined as the flow of stressed and
    unstressed syllables to create oral patterns. To
    achieve rhythm, English poets have traditionally
    counted three things  1. the number of
    syllables in a line  2. the number of stressed
    or accented syllables  3. the number of
    individual units of both stressed and unstressed
    syllables. 

23
Rhyme
  • According to Websters Dictionary, rhyme is a
    regular recurrence of corresponding sounds which
    occurs usually at the end of a line. There are
    three main types of end-rhymes  1. True rhyme
    (also called masculine) occurs exactly on one
    stressed syllable. EX. car, far  2. Feminine
    rhyme uses words of more than one syllable and
    occurs when the accented syllable rhymes. EX.
    buckle, knuckle  3. Off-rhyme or Slant Rhyme
    occurs when words sound very similar but do not
    correspond in sound exactly EX. down, noon 

From http//www.bloomington.in.us/dory/creative/
class5.html  Additional Reference
http//www.electpress.com/loveandromance/page100.h
tm 
24
THE VEGGIE LION BY SPIKE MILLIGAN
Im a vegetarian Lion, Ive given up all
meat, Ive given up all roaring All I do is go
tweet-tweet. I never ever sink my claws Into
some animals skin, It only lets the blood run
out And lets the germs rush in.
I used to be ferocious, I even tried to kill! But
the sight of all the blood made me feel quite
ill. I once attacked an Elephant I sprang
straight at his head. I woke up three days
later In a Jungle hospital bed. Now I just eat
carrots, Theyre easy to kill, Cos when I pounce
upon them, They all remain quite still!
25
6 Traits of Poetry Writing
  • 1. The Idea the heart of your poem, point
    of your message  2. The Organization the
    internal structure 3. The Voice evidence of
    the writer behind the message  4. The Word
    Choice the vocabulary or terminology used 5.
    The Fluency the rhythm and flow - how it plays
    to the ear  6. The Form the mechanical
    structure and correctness there of 

26
  • 1. A poem should flow naturally - be flowing and
    easy reading 2. It should have rhythmic symmetry
    there should be a correspondence rhythm with in
    the poem 3. Effective rhyming add to overall
    beauty and quality of poem finding the correct
    corresponding rhyme makes for a better poem 

27
http//amydot90.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/201203
18-173650.jpg
28
Get down on it!
29
The Subject
http//www.buzzle.com/articles/writing-poetry-how-
to-write-a-poem.html
30
The Feeling
http//www.buzzle.com/articles/writing-poetry-how-
to-write-a-poem.html
31
The Mood
http//www.buzzle.com/articles/writing-poetry-how-
to-write-a-poem.html
32
The Style
33
The Audience
34
Helpful Tips
35
Helpful Weblinks
  • http//www.rhymezone.com/
  • http//thesaurus.com/
  • http//www.forvo.com/ (pronunciation of difficult
    words)

36
Get down on it! Aiden Yeh
  • Procrastinate!
  • Thats what I do.
  • When things get blurry
  • I dont know what to do-
  • Making me feel totally inadequate!
  • How do I write poetry
  • When words escape me,
  • running off the mill
  • Leaving me with nothing
  • But a brain thats empty.
  • To write or not to write,
  • Perhaps, Id better stop and call it a night.
  • Theres no point of feeling uptight.
  • Tomorrow may be a better day to get down on it,
  • And finally do it right!

1227 Kaohsiung
37
Read it out loud
  • Read the poem slowly. Most adolescents speak
    rapidly, and a nervous reader will tend to do the
    same in order to get the reading over with.
    Reading a poem slowly is the best way to ensure
    that the poem will be read clearly and understood
    by its listeners. Learning to read a poem slowly
    will not just make the poem easier to hear it
    will underscore the importance in poetry of each
    and every word. A poem cannot be read too slowly,
    and a good way for a reader to set an easy pace
    is to pause for a few seconds between the title
    and the poem's first line.

http//www.loc.gov/poetry/180/p180-howtoread.html
38
  • Read in a normal, relaxed tone of voice. It is
    not necessary to give any of these poems a
    dramatic reading as if from a stage. Read in a
    natural and colloquial style. Let the words of
    the poem do the work. Just speak clearly and
    slowly.

http//www.loc.gov/poetry/180/p180-howtoread.html
39
  • Use a dictionary to look up unfamiliar words and
    hard-to-pronounce words. To read with conviction,
    a reader needs to know at least the dictionary
    sense of every word. In some cases, a reader
    might want to write out a word phonetically as a
    reminder of how it should sound. It should be
    emphasized that learning to read a poem out loud
    is a way of coming to a full understanding of
    that poem, perhaps a better way than writing a
    paper on the subject.

http//www.loc.gov/poetry/180/p180-howtoread.html
40
  • Read it more than once. Listen to your voice, to
    the sounds the words make. Do you notice any
    special effects? Do any of the words rhyme? Is
    there a cluster of sounds that seem the same or
    similar? Is there a section of the poem that
    seems to have a rhythm thats distinct from the
    rest of the poem? Dont worry about why the poem
    might use these effects. The first step is to
    hear whats going on. If you find your own voice
    distracting, have a friend read the poem to you.

http//www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19882
41
What determines where a line stops in poetry?
  • Lines are often determined by meaning, sound and
    rhythm, breath, or typography. 
  • The relationship between meaning, sound, and
    movement intended by the poet is sometimes hard
    to recognize, but there is an interplay between
    the grammar of a line, the breath of a line, and
    the way lines are broken out in the poemthis is
    called lineation. 

http//www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19882
42
  • Lines that end with punctuation,
    called end-stopped lines, are fairly simple.
  • In that case, the punctuation and the lineation,
    and perhaps even breathing, coincide to make the
    reading familiar and even predictable.

43
  • But lines that are not end-stopped present
    different challenges for readers because they
    either end with an incomplete phrase or sentence
    or they break before the first punctuation mark
    is reached.
  • The most natural approach is to pay strict
    attention to the grammar and punctuation. Reading
    to the end of a phrase or sentence, even if it
    carries over one or several lines, is the best
    way to retain the grammatical sense of a poem.

44
Talking back to a poem
  • Who is the speaker?
  • What circumstances gave rise to the poem?
  • What situation is presented?
  • Who or what is the audience?
  • What is the tone?
  • What form, if any, does the poem take?
  • How is form related to content?
  • Is sound an important, active element of the
    poem?
  • Does the poem spring from an identifiable
    historical moment?
  • Does the poem speak from a specific culture?
  • Does the poem have its own vernacular?
  • Does the poem use imagery to achieve a particular
    effect?
  • What kind of figurative language, if any, does
    the poem use?
  • If the poem is a question, what is the answer?
  • If the poem is an answer, what is the question?
  • What does the title suggest?
  • Does the poem use unusual words or use words in
    an unusual way?

45
http//www.englishcompanion.com/pdfDocs/howtoreadp
oem.pdf
46
Shel Silverstein
47
Reading Practice
http//www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19883 ht
tp//acerminaro.blogspot.tw/2012/01/red-wheelbarro
w.html
48
1759-1796
http//www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/173068
http//www.youtube.com/watch?vjggPFamB9Ok
49
How to memorize poems
  • Read and say the poem over, slowly, aloud.
  • With an index card, cover everything but the
    first line of the poem. Read it. Look away, see
    the line in air, and say it. Look back. Repeat
    until youve got it.
  • Uncover the second line. Learn it as you did the
    first line, but also add second line to first,
    until youve got the two.
  • Then its on to three. Always repeat the first
    line on down, till the whole poem sings.
  • With the poem now internalized, you are freed to
    perform it. This is to find the voice(s) of the
    poem, to find yourself there, and the poet, and
    to relate to the audience.

http//poetry.about.com/cs/textarchives/ht/howmemo
rizepoem.htm
50
Task Try Memorizing Mask by Shel Silverstein
51
Tasks
  • Create a blog account blogger.com
  • On your blog, try writing a short poem about the
    following themes
  • Difficulty in writing
  • Writing poetry
  • Feelings toward this course
  • Or on something relevant to what we discussed in
    class

52
References
  • Basic Elements of Poetry Rhythm, Rhyme and
    Imagery, http//www.poems-and-quotes.com/article.h
    tml?id398
  • Quotes about poetry, http//www.educationoasis.com
    /curriculum/Lang_Arts/quotes/quotes_about_poetry.h
    tm
  • 50 definitions of poetry, http//poetinthecity.wor
    dpress.com/2011/03/16/what-is-poetry-50-definition
    s-and-counting/
  • http//www.buzzle.com/articles/writing-poetry-how-
    to-write-a-poem.html
  • Literary Analysis http//writing.wisc.edu/Handboo
    k/ReadingPoetry.html
  • http//www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/article/2
    45464
  • http//www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/19882
  • http//www.englishcompanion.com/pdfDocs/howtoreadp
    oem.pdf
  • (fun to read http//www.shmoop.com/poetry/how-to-
    read-poem/how-to-read.html )
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