Working with clients to create value through innovative growth strategies - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Working with clients to create value through innovative growth strategies PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 68a902-NzRkY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Working with clients to create value through innovative growth strategies

Description:

Perceptions of bottled water in Australia A research report prepared for September 2009 David Stolper General Manager d.stolper_at_auspoll.com.au 02 8213 3075 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:11
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 55
Provided by: Offi61
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Working with clients to create value through innovative growth strategies


1
Perceptions of bottled water in Australia A
research report prepared for
September 2009
David Stolper General Manager d.stolper_at_auspoll.co
m.au 02 8213 3075
Jennifer Hammond Research Assistant j.hammond_at_ausp
oll.com.au 02 8213 3081
1
2
Contents
  • Research Purpose and Objectives
  • Methodology
  • Environmental issues and the place of bottled
    water
  • Perceptions of bottled water and reasons for use
  • Control versus convenience and choice
  • Conclusions
  • Appendix 1 Bottled water consumption
  • Appendix 2 Respondent profiles

2
3
Research Purpose and Objectives
3
4
Background and research purpose
  • Water is vital for life, and as such is a
    critical resource. For humans, survival is only
    possible for a few days without water.
  • A desire for convenience and ease of access to
    clean drinking water have helped fuel the market
    for bottled water.
  • The Australian Bottled Water Institute wanted to
    find out how bottled water is viewed in Australia
    who drinks bottled water, the reasons they
    choose to drink bottled water over other
    beverages and the general image of the industry.
  • The research also aimed to uncover how bottled
    water is viewed in relation to the environment.
    Specifically, what are the environmental impacts
    associated with bottled water in the eyes of
    Australians?

4
5
Research Objectives
  • The research aimed to find out how bottled water
    is viewed, particularly in relation to
    environmental factors including
  • Over-extraction of ground water
  • Problems associated with landfill
  • Drought
  • Transportation
  • Carbon miles
  • We also examined the reasons why people drink
    bottled water and why they choose bottled water
    over other beverages.
  • The possibility of a bottled water ban was
    broached in the groups to gain an insight into
    how people would feel if such a ban was enforced
    (outside of the couple of small pockets where
    such a ban is currently in place).
  • The research also examined possible community
    solutions for limiting the environmental impact
    of bottled water.

5
6
Methodology
6
7
Qualitative Methodology
  • Overall the research involved a qualitative phase
    of research followed by a short quantitative
    survey
  • The qualitative phase involved a series of 4
    discussion groups with people who frequently
    drink bottled water (at least once a fortnight)
    and people who do not.
  • They were conducted in early September in Sydney
    and Melbourne.
  • The groups were divided according to bottled
    water consumption habits - people who drink
    bottled water at least once a fortnight and
    people who drink bottled water less than once a
    fortnight (and may have reduced consumption over
    the last year).
  • Each group comprised a mix of men and women and a
    range of ages as outlined in the following table.

Location Drink bottled water at least once a fortnight Drink bottled water less than once a fortnight
Sydney Australians aged 4575 years Australians aged 18-30 years
Melbourne Australians aged 18-30 years Australians aged 31-45 years
7
8
Quantitative Methodology
  • This report also presents the results of a short
    survey among Australians to determine their
    attitudes to the consumption of bottled water.
  • The survey was undertaken online and conducted
    between the 1st and 3rd of September 2009.
  • The overall sample size was 1500, segmented and
    weighted to be nationally representative of
    Australias population by gender, age and
    location.
  • The accuracy of the results at an overall level
    (after weighting) is /-2.5 at the 95
    confidence interval. This means, for example,
    that if the survey returns a result of 50, there
    will be a 95 chance that the actual result will
    be between 47.5 and 52.5.
  • In analysing the data we have referred to the
    following age and gender sub-segments. The
    following table illustrates the sample size and
    margin of error for each segment. Further details
    of the respondent profile are included in the
    appendix.

Segment n Margin of error
All respondents 1500 /-2.5
18-24 219 /-6.6
25-34 335 /-5.4
35-44 326 /-5.4
45-54 278 /-5.9
55-64 223 /-6.6
65-74 119 /-9.0
Men 777 /-3.5
Women 723 /-3.6
9
Environmental issues and the place of bottled
water
9
10
Top-of mind environmental issues
  • When asked about the environmental issues facing
    Australia today, the main top-of-mind issues
    included
  • Climate change/global warming
  • Drought
  • Recycling
  • The environmental impacts of mining
  • Air quality
  • Increasing need for power/electricity and
  • The difficulties associated with excessive
    amounts of waste destined for landfill (including
    plastic waste).
  • Whilst is can be inferred that several of these
    issues can link back to bottled water (plastic
    waste in particular), no one directly linked
    bottled water to a major environmental problem in
    Australia today without prompting.

10
11
The place of bottled water on the environmental
agenda
  • It was only after group participants were probed
    to either give specific examples, or were asked
    outright about bottled water, that they raised
    any potential environmental problems that the
    industry faces.
  • From this, it is possible to draw the conclusion
    that the environmental impact of bottled water is
    not an important top-of-mind concern for most
    Australians.
  • Whilst there are some budding problems that could
    develop into something that needs to be addressed
    in the future, bigger picture concerns like
    global warming remain at the front of the
    collective consciousness.
  • It appears that the environmental impact of
    bottled water is not currently a hot-button
    issue, there is always the potential for this to
    change in the future.

11
12
The environmental impact of bottled water
  • When probed on the environmental impact of
    bottled water, the most common responses were
    associated with waste. Specifically
  • Plastic water bottles ending up in landfill and
  • Littering
  • Most people felt that the waste aspect of bottled
    water was the core environmental concern
    associated with the industry (far ahead of any
    other environmental impact).
  • There was a level of confusion about whether
    plastic water bottles can be recycled some
    people were under the impression that recycling
    was not possible.

I try not to buy a lot of it because I think a
lot of it will be going to the tip, so many
bottles there Melbourne regular drinker
Waste, the by-product, the empty bottles, what
do you do with it you cant recycle
it Melbourne non-regular drinker
Id be more inclined to buy bottled water more
often if it was recycled Sydney regular drinker
Plastic just doesnt break down, plastic takes
hundreds of years Sydney non-regular drinker
12
13
The environmental impact of bottled water
  • The issue of carbon miles expended in
    transporting bottled water were only briefly
    mentioned within two of the four groups, and only
    when prompted. The idea of carbon miles hadnt
    even occurred to most people. However, once the
    issue was raised, most thought it was a problem
    that should be addressed.
  • No one in the focus groups mentioned a link
    between bottled water and over-extraction of
    ground water. It was only when asked directly
    about this issue that some participants agreed
    that this might be a concern.
  • People were interested in finding out about the
    source of bottled water, not because they were
    concerned about over-extraction, but because they
    wanted to know if spring water actually meant
    that the water was from a spring (which was
    typically seen as a desirable thing).

How do we know where is comes from anyway?
Someone could be just sitting in a factory
filling bottles from a tap Sydney non-regular
drinker
Youve still got to pay for the transportation,
its freighted across the world Melbourne
non-regular drinker
You wonder where it is being sourced
from Sydney regular drinker
Rumours that bottled water companies just take
tap water Melbourne regular drinker
13
14
The main reasons people dont drink bottled water
were the cost and a preference for tap water -
the environment was a distant third
People who dont drink bottled water (n 397)
  • 4 of all respondents (N 1500) dont drink
    bottled water for environmental reasons
  • 16 of those who dont drink bottled water do
    not drink it because of environmental reasons

Qu 4 What are the reasons why you dont drink
bottled water?
15
Why people sometimes dont drink bottled water
cost, availability of tap water, want something
else (with taste)
People who drink bottled water (n 1088)
Qu 3 Why are the reasons why you would sometimes
choose to not drink bottled water (and drink
something else instead?
16
Detailed analysis of environmental reasons why
people do not drink bottled water
People who dont drink bottled water (n 397)
Qu 4 What are the reasons why you dont drink
bottled water?
17
Bottled water is placed mid-pack as an
environmental concern compared to other
frequently used products
All respondents
Average rank 4.9
Average rank 6.2
Average rank 5.4
Average rank 6.2
Average rank 6.4
Average rank 7.0
Average rank 6.8
Average rank 7.7
Average rank 6.7
Average rank 7.8
Average rank 7.9
Average rank 9.6
Average rank 8.5
Qu 5 The following are a list of products that
people use in their everyday lives. How concerned
are you about the environmental impact of each of
these? Please rank from 1-13
18
An opportunity to be proactive
  • The environmental impact of the bottled water
    industry may not be a chief concern for
    Australians at the moment, but it is possible
    that this will change in the future.
  • There is an opportunity for ABWI and bottled
    water producers to take a proactive stance in an
    effort to address those environmental issues head
    on, before they become a fashionable cause that
    attracts a high level of negative attention.
  • Focus group participants were shown a series of
    possible initiatives and asked to decide which of
    those initiatives would be the best for the
    bottled water industry. These initiatives were as
    follows
  • A bottled water brand only produced using locally
    sourced water and with the lowest transport
    distance possible (versus imported waters)
  • A bottled water brand made with filtered
    municipal water and only sold in that city/town
  • A bottled water brand that gave 25 of its
    profits to support local communities and
  • A bottled water brand that verified it was from
    sustainable water sources.

18
19
Environmental initiatives
  • A bottled water brand only produced using locally
    sourced water
  • and with the lowest transport distance possible
    (versus imported waters)
  • Non-regular drinkers from Melbourne were
    particularly in favour of this proposal. Locally
    sourced water would be lower in carbon miles.
  • There was some support amongst Sydney regular
    drinkers. However, there was an expectation that
    lower transport costs should be passed onto the
    consumer with a cheaper product.

If the waters being bottled here, its going
back into local jobs Melbourne non-regular
drinker
Low carbon footprint, verifiable
source Melbourne non-regular drinker
Id still want to know where locally (the actual
source)....not the creek Sydney regular drinker
Good (idea), but youd get variations in the
product (between towns or suburbs) Sydney
regular drinker
19
20
Environmental initiatives
  • A bottled water brand made with filtered
  • municipal water and only sold in that city/town
  • Support was mixed for this initiative.
  • There was some thought that drinking filtered
    municipal water would be much the same as
    drinking tap water.
  • This was not appealing to those who were looking
    for something different or special from what
    they saw as pure spring water.

Why are you going to bottle tap water to sell me
when I can get it from my own tap? Sydney
regular drinker
Wouldn't it be wasted energy if you have every
city and town with a factory Melbourne regular
drinker
The transport costs......the carbon emissions
arent being produced Sydney non-regular drinker
I dont get (this) one, its just bottling what
you can get in the tap, thats what it means by
municipal water I assume Melbourne regular
drinker
As soon as you say municipal water to me, I
think tap water Sydney regular drinker
20
21
Environmental initiatives
  • A bottled water brand that gave 25
  • of its profits to support local communities
  • This message prompted a positive response amongst
    regular drinkers from Melbourne.
  • Everyone in the Sydney non-regular drinker group
    liked the sound of this idea, although none voted
    for this as their favourite environmental
    initiative.
  • This was the most popular idea amongst regular
    bottled water drinkers in Sydney.
  • Whilst this was a popular idea, it could be
    improved further if it was linked to a specific
    cause in keeping with the nature of the product.
    For example, there would need to be some
    indication of which areas within the local
    community would benefit i.e. which specific
    charities or community groups.
  • There was particular support for the 25 of
    profits to go towards environmental groups such
    as Clean Up Australia or Coastwatch. The main
    environmental issues that people associated with
    bottled water were concerned with littering and
    the amount of plastic waste produced. Donating to
    environmental organisations that are involved
    with reducing litter and waste would be a
    positive way of helping to alleviate this concern
    that is in keeping with the nature of the product
    .

21
22
Environmental initiatives
  • A bottled water brand that verified
  • it was from sustainable water sources
  • This initiative received support mostly because
    of the inclusion of the word sustainable and
    the fact that the source of the water was
    specifically referred to.
  • There seemed to be a little confusion in the
    Sydney regular drinkers group they had all
    heard of the word sustainable (and thought it
    was a good idea), but did not seem to be able to
    explain exactly what it meant in the context of
    bottled water.

It would be difficult to prove it was
sustainable Sydney regular drinker
Verified sustainable water sources sounds very
nice Melbourne regular drinker
(I like it because it is about) the impact on
the environment Sydney non-regular drinker
22
23
Environmental initiatives
  • The environmental initiatives that received the
    highest level of support within the focus groups
    were the idea of a bottled water brand produced
    using locally sourced water, and a bottled water
    brand that gave 25 of profits to support local
    communities.

Initiative Level of support
A bottled water brand only produced using locally sourced water and with the lowest transport distance possible (versus imported waters) Higher level of support
A bottled water brand that gave 25 of its profits to support local communities Higher level of support
A bottled water brand made with filtered municipal water and only sold in that city/town Lower level of support
A bottled water brand that verified it was from sustainable water sources Lower level of support
23
24
How else could the bottled water industry help
the environment?
  • Within the focus groups, participants made
    several suggestions about how the bottled water
    industry could help the environment (and maybe
    pre-empt any potential environmental criticism in
    the future).
  • These suggestions included
  • Making the bottle biodegradable
  • Offering a refund on bottles to encourage
    recycling
  • Providing information on the label about where
    the water is sourced from and how it is processed
  • Planting a tree for every bottle sold
  • Having public water stations for refilling
    bottles
  • Encouraging reuse of bottles
  • Sponsor an event like Clean Up Australia Day.
  • Whilst not all of these solutions may be
    feasible, they show that there are avenues that
    bottled water producers could possibly explore in
    an effort to reduce any environmental effects,
    thereby demonstrating a commitment to reducing
    the environmental impacts associated with the
    product.

24
25
Informing public opinion
  • Whilst the environmental impact of bottled water
    is not currently seen as a major issue, this
    means there is now an opportunity to pre-empt any
    potential negativity surrounding the subject. For
    example, educating people about
  • The source of the water in the bottle where has
    it come from, is it just out of the tap?
  • Spring water let people know that if a bottled
    water brand claims to be spring water, it must
    have been sourced from a spring.
  • Recyclability many people are unsure if it is
    possible to recycle bottled water containers.
  • Packaging concerns are the empty bottles safe
    to be reused by the public?
  • The industry would be more transparent if people
    were made aware about the current bottled water
    standards (such as those listed above). This may
    make many feel more comfortable about their
    choice to drink bottled water.

25
26
The refund deposit debate
  • All focus groups mentioned the refund deposit
    scheme currently operating in South Australia,
    and many were in favour of a similar scheme being
    introduced in both New South Wales and Victoria.
  • However, a few thought that this was not really
    practical and preferred current kerbside
    recycling arrangements.
  • Some people supported kerbside recycling, but
    would like to see it continue in conjunction with
    a refund deposit scheme.

Ive always been annoyed, why do South
Australians get five cents for every bottle they
recycle, why doesnt any other state? Melbourne
regular drinker
If that five cent thing came back, it would be
such an incentive (to recycle) Sydney
non-regular drinker
(The) five cent refund is a real goer Sydney
regular drinker
If they gave good refunds on the bottles and
promised that it was going to be recycled (Id
drink more bottled water) Sydney regular drinker
Get the bottles and take them to the recycling
centre...encourage them to recycle with ten cents
or twenty cents Melbourne non-regular drinker
26
27
Perceptions of bottled water and reasons for use
27
28
Perceptions of bottled water are generally
positive
  • Bottled water generally prompted positive
    responses amongst the group participants
    (especially amongst people who regularly drink
    bottled water). In particular, bottled water was
    associated with attributes such as
  • Health
  • Youth/young people
  • Pure, fresh (particularly in relation to chilled
    bottled water)
  • Fitness/outdoor activities
  • Trendy (especially amongst younger people)
  • The reasons why people drink bottled water
    include
  • Its refreshing.
  • Its a healthier alternative to other bottled
    drinks such as juice or soft drink.
  • Its convenient (especially when tap water is not
    an option).
  • Its versatile
  • The taste (some prefer the taste of bottled water
    compared to tap water)
  • Its image (mostly in terms of healthy active
    lifestyles)

28
29
Why people drink bottled water convenience above
all
Respondents who drink bottled water (n 1088)
Qu 2 What are the reasons why would you choose
to drink bottled water?
30
Excessive levels of plastic waste was the main
negative
  • The negative aspects associated with bottled
    water focussed on
  • the amount of plastic waste produced that ends
    up in landfill or as litter (as discussed
    previously)
  • The fact that it is possible to get water out of
    a tap for free (so bottled water is sometimes
    seen as unnecessary or a waste of money,
    particularly amongst people who do not regularly
    drink bottled water)
  • Some older non-regular drinkers also saw bottled
    water as frivolous, specifically as a frivolous
    product that appeals to young trendy people (but
    in this instance, unlike in the other groups,
    being trendy was seen as a negative).

30
31
Perceptions of bottled water
  • Bottled water was frequently chosen because it
    provided a convenient source of water, especially
    when it is not possible to access tap water.
  • Even amongst people who were not regular bottled
    water drinkers, many would choose bottled water
    when there was no tap available.
  • There is a perception amongst some people though
    that bottled water is unnecessary or a waste of
    money because water is available free from the
    tap.
  • Bottled water needs to be seen in the context
    that it provides an alternative to other bottled
    drinks an alternative that is healthier than
    some of the other options on offer. It should not
    be positioned as an alternative to tap water
    (which invites environmental criticism and also
    reduces the specialness of the product).

As opposed to (soft drink) for example, I try to
think of the health benefits of just drinking any
water......as opposed to some sugary drink, this
is going to give me some health benefit Sydney
non-regular drinker
You dont always have access to fresh water,
its a convenience and portability
thing Melbourne non-regular drinker
Youre paying for the bottle as much as the
water inside, you are paying for that
versatility Melbourne regular drinker
32
Attitudes towards banning bottled water
32
33
People want to be able to choose the option of
bottled water
  • Only a few people were aware that there is a ban
    currently in place in some areas of the country.
  • Support was generally low for a widespread ban on
    bottled water (although some thought it was
    amusing). Even amongst people who were infrequent
    drinkers of bottled water and/or had reduced
    consumption in the last year, most preferred to
    have the choice of bottle water available to
    them. However, there were a few people who
    thought a ban on bottled water might be a good
    idea (particularly amongst the non-regular
    drinkers).
  • Overall, regardless of their personal feelings
    about bottled water, people preferred choice over
    control they like to make their own choices,
    and do not like to have those choices taken away.
  • Additionally, people felt that there were more
    important issues that the government should be
    worried about, rather than focussing on whether
    or not to ban bottled water.

The government can educate people (about
refilling their water bottles)......but there are
more pressing things that the government should
be dealing with Melbourne regular drinker
I have to honestly say I think it (bottled
water) is a bad thing, but if you also honestly
asked me to say what I wanted Id say yes (to
bottled water).....convenience, I want to be able
to buy a bottle of water if I want to Sydney
non-regular drinker
If you can bottle something and get people to
drink it, isnt it your commercial right to do
so Melbourne regular drinker
33
34
Over three-quarters of Australians do not want
bottled water to be banned
All respondents
Qu 6 Which of the following statements is
closest to your view?
35
Men are more likely than women to agree bottled
water should be banned
Men
Qu 6 Which of the following statements is
closest to your view?
36
Older people are more likely to agree bottled
water should be banned
All respondents
  • Qu 6 Which of the following statements is
    closest to your view?

37
Lower income households and people without
children are more likely to agree bottled water
should be banned
All respondents
  • Qu 6 Which of the following statements is
    closest to your view?

38
The concept of choice is an opportunity
  • Being able to have bottled water as an option
    when choosing what to drink is important to
    almost all people involved in the focus groups.
  • Even amongst most of the people who rarely drink
    bottled water, most would prefer bottled water as
    an option when choosing a beverage.
  • If the idea of banning bottled water starts to
    gain traction, the concept of personal choice
    versus government control may become a very
    important tool for the bottled water industry.
  • The main negatives that were raised in relation
    to bottled water centred around the fact that
    water is available free from the tap, and the
    environmental costs associated with plastic waste
    ending up in landfill or as litter.
  • Whilst water may be available free from the tap,
    bottled water provides an alternative to juice,
    soft drink or other beverages when out and about
    (and access to a tap is unlikely or difficult).
    Bottled water provides a convenient solution.

38
39
The concept of choice is an opportunity
  • Instead of focussing on paying for bottled
    water compared to accessing free tap water,
    bottled water should be seen in the context of
    choice providing water as a choice alongside
    other beverages such as juice or soft drink.
  • It seems that as drinks such as soft drink or
    juice are not available from a tap, they do not
    face the same scrutiny that bottled water faces.
  • By buying bottled water, you are paying for
    spring water, purity and/or taste.
  • If bottled water producers strive to help
    alleviate environmental concerns, particularly
    around the issue of plastic waste/landfill,
    Australians may feel more confident about
    choosing bottled water as an alternative to other
    bottled drinks
  • For example, you may be able to get water free
    from the tap, but bottled water provides a more
    environmentally friendly alternative to other
    bottled drinks.

39
40
Conclusions
40
41
Conclusions
  • Bottled water is seen as a legitimate beverage
    alternative by most people, particularly in cases
    where drinking tap water is not an option (such
    as when away from the home).
  • Overall, the image of bottled water is positive,
    and associated with refreshment, health and (in
    particular) convenience.
  • Even amongst those who avoid drinking bottled
    water, most would prefer bottled water to remain
    an option alongside other bottled drinks.
  • The negative aspects of bottled water centred
    around the fact that water is available free from
    the tap, so buying water in a bottle is seen by
    some as a waste.
  • There appears to be an instinctive comparison
    between bottled water and tap water, rather than
    a comparison between bottled water and other
    bottled beverages.

41
42
Conclusions
  • Environmentally, the main problem with bottled
    water focussed on the amount of plastic waste
    produced (contributing to landfill).
  • Whilst the environmental cost of bottled water
    was not a top-of-mind issue within the focus
    groups, this may change in the future.
  • By being proactive and addressing concerns linked
    to recycling and plastic waste (the most
    prevalent worry in the focus groups), the
    industry may pre-empt any potential future
    environmental criticism
  • Other environmental issues such as carbon miles
    and over-extraction of ground water were not
    raised within the focus groups unless the
    respondents were prompted in that specific
    direction.
  • As no link has been made between these
    environmental concerns and bottled water, it
    would be wise to avoid introducing one by
    addressing these issues head on.

42
43
Quotable quotes
Convenience.....you dont always have a tap
available Melbourne regular drinker
Youre paying for the bottle as much as the
water inside, you are paying for that
versatility Melbourne regular drinker
Generally I just like to keep a bottle in my
handbag......just the convenience of
it Melbourne regular drinker
You cant find a tap on the road Sydney
non-regular drinker
As opposed to (soft drink) for example, I try to
think of the health benefits of just drinking any
water......as opposed to some sugary drink, this
is going to give me some health benefit Sydney
non-regular drinker
I dont like this plastic bottle that it comes
in, the fact that theres millions of
them Melbourne non-regular drinker
You dont always have access to fresh water,
its a convenience and portability
thing Melbourne non-regular drinker
Its a bit of a waste of money, just go to your
tap Melbourne non-regular drinker
43
44
Quotable quotes
I think that its absurd in one respect that
we....need to buy bottled water (but) on balance,
they (bottled water) are fighting against
children drinking these high sugar caffeine
drinks Sydney non-regular drinker
I like keeping the empty bottle to reuse
it Melbourne non-regular drinker
I hope so (that bottled water comes from
springs), that's what they say it does Sydney
regular drinker
There are some places now where they say they
are going to completely ban bottled water, and I
think thats pretty impractical.....if you are
out travelling or are out with children , you
need to be able to buy a bottle of water Sydney
regular drinker
I think Im doing myself more of a service by
having normal water rather than a soft
drink Sydney regular drinker
If you actually just source your water from the
local area, youre going to cause more drought in
that area Sydney non-regular drinker
Where does all that plastic go. Its buried in
the ground, it lasts thousands of
years Melbourne non-regular drinker
Waste, the by-product, the empty bottles, what
do you do with it you cant recycle
it Melbourne non-regular drinker
44
45
Appendix 1 Bottled Water Consumption
45
45
46
Half of all Australians drink bottled water at
least once a month
All respondents
  • 28 of people drink bottled water more than once
    a week. 50 drink it at least once a month

Qu 1 How often do you consume the following
drinks? Bottled water?
47
Younger people are most likely to drink bottled
water
All respondents
Qu 1 How often do you consume the following
drinks? Bottled water?
48
Higher income households are most likely to drink
bottled water, as are households with children
All respondents
Qu 1 How often do you consume the following
drinks? Bottled water?
49
Women are somewhat more likely to drink bottled
water
All respondents
  • Qu 1 How often do you consume the following
    drinks? Bottled water?

50
In comparison, Australians consume tap water and
other bottled drinks more frequently than
bottled water
All respondents
Qu 1 How often do you consume the following
drinks? Bottled water?
51
Appendix 2 Respondent Profiles
51
51
52
Age and Gender
Segment Respondents
18 to 29 385
18 to 29 26
30 to 49 648
30 to 49 43
50 467
50 31

Male 777
Male 52
Female 723
Female 48
  • Total respondents 1500
  • All figures are rounded. Accordingly, total
    percentages may not equal 100

53
Area of residence
Segment Respondents
Metropolitan 1016
Metropolitan 68
Regional 484
Regional 32

New South Wales 510
New South Wales 34
Victoria 360
Victoria 24
Queensland 284
Queensland 19
Other 346
Other 24
  • Total respondents 1500
  • All figures are rounded. Accordingly, total
    percentages may not equal 100

54
Household annual income
Segment Respondents
0 -39,999 327
0 -39,999 22
40,000 - 79,999 459
40,000 - 79,999 31
80,000 - 149,999 386
80,000 - 149,999 26
150,000 91
150,000 6
  • Total respondents 1263. 237 respondents
    preferred not to state their income.
  • All figures are rounded. Accordingly, total
    percentages may not equal 100
About PowerShow.com