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Today in Astronomy 102:

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Today in Astronomy 102: real black holes, as formed in the collapse of massive, dead stars Formation of a black hole from stellar collapse. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Today in Astronomy 102:


1
Today in Astronomy 102 real black holes, as
formed in the collapse of massive, dead stars
  • Formation of a black hole from stellar collapse.
  • Properties of spacetime near black holes.
  • Black holes have no hair.
  • Spacetime is stuck to the black hole.
  • Spinning black holes.
  • Picture artists conception of a 16 M? black
    hole accreting material from a 10 M? companion
    star (from Chaisson and McMillan, Astronomy
    today).

2
Collapse of a star to form a black hole
Before
Mass 6 M? Circumference 1.3x107 km
120 lb
9x106 km
3
Collapse of a star to form a black hole
(continued)
After
Spacetime is warped drastically near the horizon.
120 lb
Mass 6 M? Circumference 111 km
Spacetime is the same outside the stars former
limits as it was before.
9x106 km
4
Spacetime diagram for stars circumference (only
radius and space curvature not shown) and photons
A-C
The singularity (quantum gravitational object)
Horizon (Schwarzschild singularity)
C
111 km
B
Time (for distant or nearby observer scale is
different for the two, though.)
222 km
A
a.k.a. Finkelsteins time
Circumference 444 km
5
Appearance of star in the final stages of
collapse to a black hole, to an observer on the
surface
Nothing in particular happens as the star passes
through its horizon circumference the collapse
keeps going until the mass is concentrated at a
point, which takes very little time.
444 km
t 0
222 km t 0.0002 sec
111 km t 0.00027 sec
0 km (!) t 0.00031 sec
6
Appearance of star in the final stages of
collapse to a black hole, to a distant observer
In hyperspace (embedding diagram)
In reality
A
444 km
15 redshift
B
222 km
41 redshift
C
111 km
Infinite redshift
(after a long time)
Stays this size, henceforth (frozen).
(Looks black!)
7
For math adepts
  • In case youre wondering where the numbers come
    from in the calculated results were about to
    show -- they come from equations that can be
    obtained fairly easily from the absolute interval
    that goes with the Schwarzschild metric, which we
    first saw a few lectures ago
  • We wont be showing, or making you use, these
    equations, but we can give you a personal tour of
    them if youd like.
  • A 6 M? black hole is used throughout unless
    otherwise indicated.

F
I
2
D
2
r
GM
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
D
D
D
D



-
-
H
K
q
q
f
1
sin
s
r
r
c
t
2
GM
2
rc
-
1
2
rc
8
Space and time near the new black hole
After
Time is warped in strong gravity.
Very slow.
Very slightly (factor of 1.000002) slower.
On time.
Unchanged
9x106 km
9
Gravitational time dilation near the new black
hole
Duration of clock ticks (in seconds) a distant
observer sees from a clock near a black hole.
If time werent warped
1
Orbit circumference, in event horizon
circumferences (CS).
10
Space and time near the new black hole (continued)
W
X
Y
Z
Physical space
R C/2p
Y
After
Z
Hyperspace
Space is also strongly warped for instance,
points Y and Z are the same distance apart as
points W and X.
11
Gravitational space warping near the new black
hole
Infinite, at the horizon
Distance (in meters), along the direction toward
the black hole, to the orbit 2p meters larger in
circumference
If space werent warped
1
Orbit circumference, in event horizon
circumferences (CS).
12
Other effects of spacetime curvature weight and
tides
Weight
Force, in Earth gs
Tidal force
The tides are for a 170 cm person lying along the
direction toward the black hole.
1
Orbit circumference, in event horizon
circumferences (CS).
13
How weight and tides depend upon black hole mass
Weight (in Earth gs)
For comparison the weight and tidal force youre
feeling right now are respectively 1g and 5x10-7g.
1
Tidal force, 170 cm person (in Earth gs)
1
1
Black hole mass (in M?)
14
Orbital speed near the new black hole
Speed in circular orbit, as a percentage of the
speed of light
The orbital speed hits the speed of light at
1.5CS, so no closed orbits exist closer than this
to the black hole.
1
Orbit circumference, in event horizon
circumferences (CS).
15
Mid-lecture break.
  • Homework 4 is now available on WeBWorK. It is
    due at 1 AM on Saturday, 27 October 2001.

Image a 1.4M? neutron star, compared to New York
City. (From Chaisson and McMillan, Astronomy
today.)
16
Black holes have no hair
  • Meaning after collapse is over with, the black
    hole horizon is smooth nothing protrudes from
    it and that almost everything about the star
    that gave rise to it has lost its identity during
    the black holes formation. No hair is left to
    stick out.
  • Any protrusion, prominence or other departure
    from spherical smoothness gets turned into
    gravitational radiation it is radiated away
    during the collapse.
  • Any magnetic field lines emanating from the star
    close up and get radiated away (in the form of
    light) during the collapse.

Visitors to black holes suffer the effects too?
17
Black holes have no hair (continued)
  • The identity of the matter that made up the star
    is lost. Nothing about its previous configuration
    can be reconstructed.
  • Even the distinction between matter and
    antimatter is lost two stars of the same mass,
    but one made of matter and one made of
    antimatter, would produce identical black holes.
  • The black hole has only three quantities in
    common with the star that collapsed to create it
    mass, spin and electric charge.
  • Only very tiny black holes can have much electric
    charge stars are electrically neutral, with
    equal numbers of positively- and
    negatively-charged elementary particles.
  • Spin makes the black hole horizon depart from
    spherical shape, but its still smooth.

18
Space and time are stuck at black hole horizons
  • Time is stuck at the event horizon.
  • From the viewpoint of a distant observer, time
    appears to stop there (infinite gravitational
    time dilation).
  • Space is stuck at the event horizon.
  • Within r 1.5 RS, all geodesics (paths of light
    or freely-falling masses) terminate at the
    horizon, because the orbital speed is equal to
    the speed of light at r 1.5 RS nothing can
    be in orbit.

19
Space and time are stuck at black hole horizons
(continued)
  • Thus from near the horizon, the sky appears to
    be compressed into a small range of angles
    directly overhead the range of angles is smaller
    the closer one is to the horizon, and vanishes at
    the horizon. (The objects in the sky appear bluer
    than their natural colors as well, because of the
    gravitational Doppler shift).
  • Thus space itself is stuck to the horizon, since
    one end of each geodesic is there.
  • If the horizon were to move or rotate, the ends
    of the geodesics would move or rotate with it.
    Black holes can drag space and time around.

20
Spinning black holes
  • Close enough to the rotating black hole, space
    rotates so fast that it becomes impossible for a
    body to hover in such a way that they would
    appear stationary to a distant observer. This
    region is called the ergosphere.
  • The ergosphere represents a large fraction of the
    rotational energy of the black hole.
  • 0-30 of the total energy of the black hole can
    be present in this rotation, outside the horizon.
    (The faster it rotates, the higher the
    percentage.)
  • Since this energy exists outside the horizon, it
    can be tapped (Penrose, 1969).

21
Spinning black holes (continued)
  • Effects of spin on the shape of a black hole
    (horizon plus ergosphere) are similar to those on
    normal matter flattening of the poles, bulging
    of the equator.

Rotation axis
North
Spinning at a surface speed 60 of the speed of
light.
Not spinning.
22
Cross sections (through N and S poles) of black
holes with same mass, different spins
N
0
50
80
Spin rate given as percentages of the maximum
value. Horizon Ergosphere
100
90
23
Spinning black hole (continued)
  • Because spacetime is stuck to the horizon, space
    is dragged along with the spin. The closer to the
    horizon one looks, the faster space itself seems
    to rotate (Kerr, 1964). This appears as a
    tornado-like swirl in hyperspace (see Thorne p.
    291).

Motion of a body trying to hover motionless above
the horizon of a spinning BH, as seen by a
distant observer above the north pole.
24
Spinning black holes (continued)
No spin
Spinning counter- clockwise
Straight descent to the equator of a black
hole, as it appears to a distant observer who
looks down on the north pole.
25
There are stable orbits closer to spinning black
holes than non-spinning ones.
  • In the reference frame of a distant observer,
    anyway, and for orbits in the same direction as
    the spin. Here are two black holes with the same
    mass, viewed from a great distance up the north
    pole

Innermost stable orbit clockwise counter-clockwis
e
Photon orbit clockwise counter-clockwise
Photon orbit
Horizon
Innermost stable orbit
Ergosphere
80 of maximum spin, counterclockwise
No spin
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