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Faculty of Education

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Title: Faculty of Education


1
  • Faculty of Education
  • Additional Qualifications
  • Module 04
  • Summer 2009
  • André Samson Ph.D., c.o.

2
Overview of the Presentation
  • 1. Vocational Indecision
  • 1.1 Definition
  • 1.2 Magnitude of the Problem
  • 1.3 Causes of Indecision
  • 1.4 Sociological Context
  • 1.5 Irrational Beliefs Related to Indecision
  • 2. Academic Transitions
  • 2.1 Making a Choice
  • 2.2 Signs of Discomfort
  • 2.3 Discomfort Statistics
  • 2.4 Interventions

3
Overview of the Presentation
  • 3. Social and Economic Insertion
  • 3.1 Transition Period
  • 3.2 Length of Academic/Professional Transition
  • 3.3 Graduate Students and the Workplace
  • 4. Career Counselling and Globalization
  • 4.1 21st Century Work Ethic
  • 4.2 A Post-Modern Approach

4
1. Vocational Indecision
1.1 Definition
  • Indecision A persons inability to make a choice
    when they are forced to do so
  • Indecision has a negative connotation doubt,
    hesitation, unclear, disorientation
  • Some authors consider indecision a form of
    personal maladjustment
  • Indecision is often associated with poor results
    at school, dropping out of school and personal
    dissatisfaction or poor self-esteem

5
1. Vocational Indecision
1.2 Magnitude of the Problem
  • Only 20 of students who pursue collegial studies
    in Quebec have a precise career project in mind
  • A study found that in high school students
    (grades 10,11 and 12)
  • 38.6 did not have a specific career goal in mind
  • 48.3 had a certain idea of what they wanted to
    do
  • 13.1 had no career goal

6
1. Vocational Indecision
1.3 Causes of Indecision
7
1. Vocational Indecision
1.3 Causes of Indecision
  • There is no significant difference between boys
    and girls when it comes to career indecision.
    However, boys tend to lose interest quicker and
    girls often have a more pessimistic outlook on
    their professional future
  • In economically disadvantaged areas, indecision
    is mostly associated with stunted personal
    development
  • These would be due to external barriers

8
1. Vocational Indecision
1.4 Sociological Context
  • There are over 1500 different types professions
    today. Simply consulting the Canadian code of
    professions gives an idea of the immense choice
    possibilities
  • In the past, people explored and learned how to
    perform tasks through direct contact
  • Today, exploration is done in a classroom
    setting, or in other words at a distance
  • Also, the labour force is in constant mutation.
    It is hard to stay informed with all these
    changes
  • Based on this context, it is understandable that
    students could fear making a choice

9
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
There is one perfect job for me
False! In fact, there are a number of professions
that share common elements and that can meet your
interests.
(Falardeau, 2003)
10
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
How do I know I am making the best decision?
It is impossible to be 100 certain. An absolute
certainty does not constitute a choice. Making a
career choice is a process over time. It is
always possible to readjust your objectives.
(Falardeau, 2003)
11
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
I need to work in a profession that is demanding
and socially recognised
False! Work only accounts for one portion of your
life, it can not meet all your expectations.
There are other places where you can fulfill
those needs family, leisure or volunteer work.
Value is intrinsic and can not be generated by
external activities.
(Falardeau, 2003)
12
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
I will have only one career in my lifetime
False! In current economic times, people do not
chose what they will do for the rest of their
lives at 18 years old. Rather, you should be
prepared to face many career transitions.
(Falardeau, 2003)
13
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
When I find my perfect job, I will know. It will
click!
False! We do not choose a profession the same way
we fall in love. There will always be a certain
level of indecision when making a career choice.
(Falardeau, 2003)
14
1. Vocational Indecision
1.5 Irrational Beliefs Associated to Indecision
People that change their mind never succeed
False! Changing programs could be a way to get
closer to your goals and/or objectives. Leaving
or readjusting can be a way to specify your
choice. It would be absurd to continue down the
wrong path.
(Falardeau, 2003)
15
2. Academic Transitions
2.1 Making a Choice
16
2. Academic Transitions
2.2 Signs of Discomfort
Doubt Related to Program Selection
  • Solution
  • Avoid making impulsive decisions that can be
    brought on by the fear of the unknown and
    difficulty adapting to a new context.
  • Feeling that a choice was not well thought out. A
    last minute decision that did not factor in
    personal aptitudes and economic conditions.
  • Disappointment in the program chosen.
    Expectations are not met and the reality of
    post-secondary education is harder than expected.
  • During the exam period, doubt sets in. Motivation
    diminishes and the individual starts to consider
    leaving university for good or changing programs.

17
2. Academic Transitions
2.2 Signs of Discomfort
Doubt Related to Professional Goals
  • Solution
  • It is sometimes difficult for the individual to
    take responsibility for their career choices.
    Individuals fell that by choosing one path, they
    are rejecting the others. No career goal can
    bring absolute certainty. The thought of feeling
    comfortable in the same profession for the rest
    of your life is totally unrealistic. A
    professional career is full of uncertainty.
  • Fear of not making the right career choice.
  • Goals are not precise and the professional
    objectives are vague.
  • Having difficulty perceiving themselves as being
    part of the workforce.

18
2. Academic Transitions
2.2 Signs of Discomfort
Self-Doubt
  • Solution
  • Important to give some time to develop tolerance
    towards incertitude. This is the only way to be
    able to make room for reflection.
  • Important to identify what caused this doubt and
    questioning.
  • Important to open up to a professional or
    someone they trust to see another point of view.
  • Doubt that university program selection is based
    on a long thought process. Impression that the
    family or social context have played a large
    role.
  • Feeling of being different than their peers. Do
    not share the same tastes, same values or same
    objectives. Sense of solitude and isolation.
  • Conflict arises with peers and/or professors,
    lowered quality of life and higher stress levels.

19
2. Academic Transitions
20
2. Academic Transitions
2.3 Discomfort Statistics
Academic transition is an important step in
everyone's life For the last 8 years, 10 - 14
of students have dropped out of university after
their first year Since 2003, the year of the
double cohort, 18 of students have left the
University of Ottawa after their first
year... 38 of students who have dropped out of
university say they did so in order to figure out
their career path Research preformed with
students from the University of Ottawa by
Jean-Luc Daoust, Specialist in academic
perseverance
21
2. Academic Transitions
2.4 Interventions 2.4.1 Setting Goals
A team of researchers at Harvard did a study with
university graduates, 10 years after obtaining
their diploma The results showed that people
who have precise goals, obtained salaries that
were 3x higher after 10 years People who have
written these goals down on paper, obtained
salaries that were 10x higher after 10 years
Planning for Career Success Those Who Plan Do
Better, Kate Wendleton
22
2. Academic Transitions
2.4 Interventions
23
3. Social and Economic Insertion
3.1 Transition Period
  • The individuals first full-time job thrusts them
    into majority status
  • They acquire autonomy with respect to their
    family
  • They acquire independence as individuals
  • They develop new social roles
  • The social integration process in the workplace
    is a complex phenomenon that can suffer, due to
  • Socioeconomic activity
  • Technological changes, globalization
  • Workplace rules
  • Certification of knowledge, regulation of
    professional practice
  • Personal factors
  • Personal control, academic training, personal
    abilities

24
3. Social and Economic Insertion
3.2 Length of Academic/Professional Transitions
25
3. Social and Economic Insertion
3.2 Length of Academic/Professional Transitions
  • Less and less students 15 to 24 years of age have
    completed their initial transition from school to
    the workplace
  • In 1985, socioprofessional insertion started at
    16 years of age and finished around the age of
    21. In 1998, the academic/professional transition
    started around 16 and finished around 23 years.

26
3. Social and Economic Insertion
3.3 Graduate Students and the Workplace
27
3. Social and Economic Insertion
3.3 Graduate Students and the Workplace
53 of people who had workplace experience found a job within 30 days of obtaining their bachelors degree 53 of people who had workplace experience found a job within 30 days of obtaining their bachelors degree 53 of people who had workplace experience found a job within 30 days of obtaining their bachelors degree
Work Experience 2 years 5 years
Full-time work 85 94
Part-time work 15 6
www.jobfutures.ca www.jobfutures.ca www.jobfutures.ca
28
4. Career Counselling and Globalization
4.1 21st Century Work Ethic
  • According to Savickas (1993) career counselling
    will no longer simply aim to promote career
    development
  • Career counsellors will have to encourage the
    development of self-affirmation, the exploration
    of career values and decision making skills
  • In other words, self-development will become more
    import than career development
  • The role of work will lose its importance
    compared to other functions. Todays workplace is
    considered less of a place to invest yourself and
    more of a place to invest in yourself.
  • Savickas, M.L.(1993). Career Counseling in the
    Postmodern Era. Journal of Cogntive
    Psychotherrapy An international Quarterly,(7) 3,
    201-215.

29
4. Career Counselling and Globalization
4.2 A Post-Modern Approach
  • The post-modern approach indicates the end of a
    normative system that can be universally applied.
    This new era involves the disappearance of norms.
    Each individual must establish their own career
    model.
  • The career counsellor must play a key role in
    this new culture
  • Their role is no longer to insure that the client
    meets social norms
  • They must help their clients elaborate their own
    career projects based on their individual
    realities
  • The clients then become managers of their own
    career development

30
4. Career Counselling and Globalization
4.2 A Post-Modern Approach
31
4. Career Counselling and Globalization
Websites to Consult
  • www.canadausemployment.com
  • www.workopolis.com
  • www.jobboom.com
  • www.mazemaster.on.ca
  • www.on.workinfonet.ca
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