Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and Implications for Physical Activity Promotion) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and Implications for Physical Activity Promotion) PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 687335-MjExN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and Implications for Physical Activity Promotion)

Description:

Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and Implications for Physical Activity Promotion) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:122
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and Implications for Physical Activity Promotion)


1
Project Wellness and The Social Norms Method for
Health Enhancement and Harm Reduction (and
Implications for Physical Activity Promotion)
2
(No Transcript)
3
(No Transcript)
4
Goals of Project Wellness
  • Correct campus misperceptions that most K-State
    students are heavy drinkers who do not know how
    to use alcohol safely or responsibly and
    therefore cause harm to themselves or others.
  • Reduce heavy drinking among K-State students to
    more moderate and safer levels. And increase use
    of protective behaviors.
  • Reduce harm experienced as a result of heavy
    drinking and/or infrequent use of protective
    behaviors.

5
Theory and Research Behind the Social Norms
Method
6
Social Norm
  • An expected standard of behavior and belief
    established and enforced by a group
  • A pattern or trait taken to be typical in the
    behavior of a social group
  • Peoples perception of social norms
  • are often a good predictor of
  • what they will say and do

7
October 1987 Students Carrying Backpacks
8
March 2003 Students Carrying Backpacks
9
Sociological Theory
  • Norms are fundamental to understanding the social
    order and variations in human behavior (Campbell,
    1964 Durkheim, 1951)

10
Sociological Theory
  • Sociologist Wesley Perkins (2002) notes that
    social psychologists have long argued that
    people tend to adopt group attitudes and act in
    accordance with group expectations and behaviors
    based on affiliation needs and social comparison
    processes (Festinger, 1954), social pressure
    toward group conformity (Asch, 1951, 1952), and
    the formation and acquisition of reference group
    norms (Newcomb, 1943 Newcomb and Wilson, 1966
    Sherif, 1936, 1972)

11
Research of W. Perkins and A. Berkowitz,
Sociologists
  • Found that college students regularly and grossly
    overestimated the drinking of their peers, and
    thus created a false norm of heavy drinking

12
A Premise of Social Norms Method
  • A powerful determinant of college student
    behavior (particularly related to drinking) is
    what they perceive or believe other students are
    doing what is the norm

13
Why peer influence is so powerful during college
years
  • Time of personal development
  • Time of Forming and Norming lifetime attitudes
  • Distance from family
  • Availability of peers
  • Low influence of campus adults

14
Mechanisms that cause and perpetuate the false
norm
  • Media Attention to sensational, atypical events
  • Images from popular culture

15
Causes of false norm (cont.)
  • Public conversation
  • Did you see Jack at the party last night
  • Vividness effect
  • Attribution error

16
Perception vs. Actual False Norm at K-State?
17
How a False Norm Can Function in a Social Group
  • Pluralistic Ignorance
  • When one falsely believes ones private
    attitudes, judgments, or behaviors are different
    from the majority.
  • Individual adjusts actions to fit in increases
    participation in what he/she thinks is socially
    desirable.

18
Social Norms Model Alcohol-Related Harm
Alcohol Use Behaviors
Harmful Consequences
Alcohol Use Misperceptions
19
The Opportunity
  • College students actual drinking norm is much
    less than what they perceive it to be

20
Social Norms theory hypothesis
  • If students know the true norm of their peers
    their own behavior will be more consistent with
    this behavior than with the false norm.

21
Social Norms Model Reducing Harm
More Moderate Alcohol Use
Less Harmful Consequences
Correct Information on Alcohol-Use Norms
22
Applying Social Norms Method Media Campaign
Procedures
  • Get information from target population --Survey
    student body
  • Inform target population about alcohol use norms
    of students through consistent media messages

23
Project Wellness 2003 Survey Data
  • Responsible drinking is the norm at
  • K-State!
  • K-Staters average about one drink per hour when
    they party.
  • Most (56) party one or fewer nights per week.

24
2003 Survey Data (cont.)
  • K-Staters know how to keep themselves and others
    safe when they use alcohol!
  • Of those who drink
  • 88 choose to drink in places they know they
    will be safe
  • 88 report they never pressure someone to drink
  • 84 report they usually or always have a
    designated driver
  • 62 report they keep track of the number of
    drinks they have

25
2003 Survey Data (cont.)
  • Alcohol-related harm is low
  • 98 Report they have not required medical
    attention because of their drinking
  • 90 Report they have not been in a physical fight
    due to their drinking
  • 85 Report they have not damaged property due to
    their drinking
  • 82 Report they have not done poorly on a test or
    important project because of their drinking

26
Getting information on norms
  • Classroom Survey
  • Media Testing
  • Focus Groups
  • Poster Incentive Project
  • Freshman Focus Groups
  • Seminar Investigating The Student Experience
  • VIP/Influential Students Project (Tippers)
  • On-line Journaling Discussion Group With
    Leadership Students

27
What We Learned Consequences Students Want to
Avoid
  • Doing something embarrassing, humiliating
  • Hangovers
  • Late for or miss class/work
  • Weight gain decrease physical fitness
  • Assault, accident, DUI terrible, but not likely

28
What We Learned Protective Behaviors Utilized by
Students
  • Designated drivers
  • Buddy system
  • Time management
  • Limit money
  • Idiosyncratic ways of knowing when to stop
  • Upperclassmen learned how to drink more safely
    from experience

29
What We Learned Whats Important to Students
  • Academic success
  • Graduating, getting desired job
  • Physical health
  • Healthy relationships and friendships
  • Fun, stress relief, letting go

30
Delivering Social Norms Messages
  • 127 advertisements
  • ( 27 Fall, 12 Spring)
  • Posters (2000, 2001)
  • Flyers
  • Give-away items
  • Banner
  • Web site

31
Advertising in the Collegian Progression of Media
Development
Give basic consumption messages
32
Advertising in the Collegian Progression of Media
Development
Highlight protective behaviors
33
Advertising in the Collegian Progression of Media
Development
Link drinking with important issues emphasize
safer partying
34
Advertising in the Collegian Progression of Media
Development
Improve the link between other health/important
issues and drinking
35
Characteristics of Social Norms Marketing
  • Positive
  • Promotes, supports, and affirms the healthy
    behaviors of students
  • Motivates them to use the skills they already
    possess
  • Inclusive
  • No one is excluded from access to wellness
  • Empowering
  • Encourages people to act on their own behalf
    and identifies what they can do to realize
    wellness

36
Measuring Outcomes of Intervention
  • Survey data
  • Focus group data
  • Mall intercept data
  • Auxiliary data
  • Qualitative interviews with KSU student services
    personnel
  • Data from KSU student services

37
Outcome measures Data on Perception of
Consumption (Nights Party/Week)
- - - - - No media
38
Outcome measures Data on Perception of
Protective Behaviors
39
Outcome measures Harmful Consequences
- - - / - - - No media
40
Other Social Norms Implementations
41
Injunctive (Attitudinal) Norms
  • Addressing students attitudes about and comfort
    with high risk health behaviors.

42
Can Social Norms be used for Physical Activity
Promotion?
  • Combine Social Norms and Theory of Reasoned
    Action
  • Recall
  • Subjective norm perceived social pressure to to
    perform or not perform the behavior
  • Normative beliefs perceived expectations of
    important others
  • Motivation to comply with normative beliefs

43
Theory of Reasoned Action
Behavioral Beliefs
Evaluation of B. B
Attitude
Behavior
Intention
Subjective Norm
Motivation to Comply
Normative Beliefs
44
Example PA in Older Adults (50)
  • Godin and Shephard (1990)
  • Adult population held favorable impression of
    physicians attitude toward exercise.
  • People had desire to comply with such beliefs.

45
Possible Social Norms Marketing Strategies
  • To increase normative beliefs that important
    others (physician and peers) approve of regular
    PA and to increase motivation to comply --
  • Advertise normative beliefs of physicians and
    older adults toward PA for older adults

46
Possible Social Norms message
  • Most Physicians in Sometown strongly approve of
    regular exercise for older adults.
  • Most seniors in Sometown believe staying PA is
    important.
  • Here are typical ways Sometown seniors stay
    active
  • Attend water aerobics at YMCA
  • Walk the mall with mall walkers group
  • Engage in 20-30 minutes of yard and house work
  • Participate in movement classes at community
    center
About PowerShow.com