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Backward Planning

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Backward Planning – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Backward Planning


1
Backward Planning
2
  • To begin with the end in mind means to start with
    a clear understanding of your destination. It
    means to know where you are going so that you
    better understand where you are now so that the
    steps you take are always in the right direction.
    Covey, Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

3
Backward Design Program Planning
  • Stage 1 Identify targeted understandings
  • Stage 2 Determine appropriate assessment of
    those understandings
  • Stage 3 Plan learning experiences and
    instruction that make such understanding possible
  • (Wiggins and McTighe, Understanding by Design)

4
Necessary Attitudes for Inclusive Teaching
  • All Learners Belong
  • ( Inclusionary philosophy, history,
    legislation, terminology, LRE)
  • Respecting Differences
  • ( beyond accepting differences, placing
    diversity of learners at beginning of planning,
    not afterthought Principles of UDL)
  • Teacher as Learner
  • (teaching as spectacularly open-ended)
  • Faith/hope ( use moral compass)

5
Necessary Knowledge For Inclusive Pedagogy (What?)
  • Issues of Diversity
  • (id process fairness, continuum of
    learning environments, resources, Ministry of Ed
    requirements, funding, staffing, Prov. Programs,
    transition planning, controversies)
  • Inclusionary Curriculum
  • (goal for every learner to reach potential
    familiar with PLOs ) contd.

6
  • Common vehicles of instruction
  • (strategies for engagement open-
  • ended, DI)

7
Necessary Skills for Inclusionary Practice (HOW)
  • Identifying Learners Needs and Strengths
  • (characteristics of high incidence
    disabilities categories theory for teaching
    learners with specific characteristics,
    commonalities, exceptionalities custom fit
    instruction)
  • Reflecting ( individual dynamics reflection in
    action/reflection on action)

  • contd.

8
  • Collaborating ( parents, educators,
    paraprofessionals, medical professionals )
  • Problem-solving( How will I orchestrate the
    diversity to meet goal of all students
    succeeding? )

9
Core Ideas/Essential Understandings
  • Specific generalizations about the big ideas
  • Summarize key meanings, inferences, importance of
    the content.
  • Moral of the story

10
Essential Understandings Educ 427
  • 1a To critically examine the philosophy, history,
    approaches and critical issues of inclusion of
    students with high incidence disabilities.
  • 1 b. To reflect on your core beliefs and values
    and how they influence your practice and your
    students learning.

11
  • 2a To investigate current research and theory
    regarding meeting the needs of students with High
    Incidence disabilities.
  • 2b To develop and implement respectful and
    responsive classroom practices and
    interventions to meet students needs, based on
    available research and literature.

12
Specific objectives
  • awareness of high incidence categories and
    typical characteristics
  • apply knowledge of characteristics of students
    with high incidence to plan and implement
    adaptations, modifications and differentiated
    instructional strategies for effective
    instruction
  • awareness of pre-referral processes and referral
    procedures for students with special needs
  • - awareness of the IEP requirements and roles and
    responsibilities for IEP development
  • to use formal and informal tools to create a
    learning profile, including an IEP

13
  • awareness of generic strategies designed to
    actively engage learners
  • - incorporate teaching to diversity approach into
    unit planning, rather than treating diversity as
    a separate concept
  • awareness of skills, roles/responsibilities for
    collaborative planning and communication with
    colleagues, paraprofessionals, and parents
  • to identify/ explain/apply principles of
    Universal Designs for Learning Differentiated
    Instruction Response to Intervention Gardiners
    Multiple Intelligences Assessment for Learning

14
Assessment
  • - awareness of the IEP requirements and roles and
    responsibilities for IEP development
  • to use formal and informal tools to create a
    learning profile, including an IEP
  • Assignment to demonstrate Learning Profile
  • - reflect on your core beliefs and values
    and how they influence your practice and your
    students learning. Assignment to demonstrate
    Reflective Journal

15
  • awareness of high incidence categories and
    typical characteristics
  • awareness of skills, roles/responsibilities for
    collaborative planning and communication with
    colleagues, paraprofessionals, and parents
  • to identify/ explain/apply principles of
    Universal Designs for Learning Differentiated
    Instruction Response to Intervention Gardiners
    Multiple Intelligences Assessment for Learning
  • Assignment Midterm

16
  • to apply principles of Universal Designs for
    Learning Differentiated Instruction Response to
    Intervention Gardiners Multiple Intelligences
    Assessment for Learning
  • awareness of generic strategies designed to
    actively engage learners
  • incorporate teaching to diversity approach into
    unit planning, rather than treating diversity as
    a separate concept
  • Assignments Unit Plans/ Demo Lesson

17
E.U (sample for Vocab)
  • How a word or phrase I used determines its
    meaning.
  • A rich vocabulary enables us to understand and
    communicate more effectively.
  • Vocabulary is acquired through reading, writing,
    listening and speaking.
  • A dictionary and thesaurus are resources for
    finding, understanding and using words.

18
EU sample Equivalence (Math)
  • Numerals can represent many numbers
  • Equal means of the same value and does not
    mean calculate the answer
  • The same mathematical ideas can be represented
    concretely, graphically, or symbolically. Context
    determines which is most appropriate.

19
EU Sample (Begin Reading)
  • Proficient readers use the relationship between
    letters and sounds of speech and spelling
    patterns to problem solve, read fluently and
    comprehend.
  • Proficient readers use print cues to solve
    unknown words while still focusing on meaning and
    structure.
  • P. Readers develop and use a variety of
    strategies to attend to info from different
    sources.

20
EU Sample Genre (English)
  • Different genres have different structures and
    conventions.
  • Authors choose a particular genre for a specific
    purpose.
  • Characteristics of genre may overlap or cut
    across lines of genre.

21
  • If we had at our grasp the most elegant
    curriculum in the world and it missed the mark
    for students with learning disabilities, highly
    advanced learners, students with limited English
    proficiency, young people who lack economic
    support, kids who struggle to read, and a whole
    host of others, the curriculum would fall short
    of its promise.
  • (McTighe and Tomlinson, 2006)

22
  • On the other hand, if we were the most effective
    disciples of flexible grouping, interest-based
    instruction, responsive environments, and a host
    of instructional strategies that allow us to
    attend to learner variance but used those
    approaches in the absence of powerful curriculum,
    our classrooms would fail to equip students with
    the ideas and skills necessary to make their way
    in the world.
  • (McTighe and Tomlinson, 2006)

23
  • Simply put, quality classrooms evolve around
    powerful knowledge that works for each student.
    That is, they require quality curriculum and
    quality instruction. In tandem, UbD and DI
    provide structures, tools, and guidance for
    developing curriculum and instruction based on
    our current best understandings of teaching and
    learning. (McTighe and Tomlinson, 2006)
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