Gravitation in 3D Spacetime - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Gravitation in 3D Spacetime PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 67a149-NDQxO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

Description:

Gravitation in 3D Spacetime John R. Laubenstein IWPD Research Center Naperville, Illinois 630-428-9842 www.iwpd.org 2009 APS April Meeting Denver, Colorado – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:17
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 63
Provided by: JohnLaub2
Learn more at: http://www.iwpd.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Gravitation in 3D Spacetime


1

Gravitation in 3D Spacetime
John R. Laubenstein IWPD Research
Center Naperville, Illinois 630-428-9842 www.iwpd.
org
2009 APS April Meeting Denver, Colorado May 5,
2009
2
Who We Are
  • Our team has been working together for over
  • 10 years, with our center becoming
    incorporated
  • in 2005
  • Among our various activities, we explore
  • relationships between
  • Observational data
  • Physical constants
  • Physical laws


3
Presentation Goal
  • IWPD Scale Metrics (ISM) DOES NOT
  • Claim to identify some past error or oversight
    that sets
  • the world right
  • Suggest that past achievements should be
    discarded for
  • some new vision of reality


4
Presentation Goal
  • IWPD Scale Metrics DOES
  • Suggest an alternative description of
    space-time
  • Show that ISM is equivalent to 4-Vector
    space-time
  • (at least in terms of velocity)
  • Modify gravitation so that it can be described
    using ISM
  • Show that ISM makes predictions and establishes
  • relationships that are consistent with
    observation


5
Adding to the Base of Knowlege
  • ISM quantitatively links Scale Metrics and
    4-Vector
  • space-time through a mathematical
    relationship
  • Scale Metrics and 4-Vectors are shown to be
  • equivalent (at least for specific
    conditions)
  • Scale Metrics adds to the body of knowledge


6
Flatlander
  • Approach. We will conceptually develop ISM
  • using a two-dimensional flat manifold
  • Why? Because in our world we understand both
  • 3D and 2D Euclidean geometry
  • Verification. You can serve as the judge and
    jury
  • over the decisions made by the Flatlanders
  • Result. If successful, a model of 3D
    Spacetime
  • will be established that is equivalent to
  • 4-Vector Spacetime


7
Flatlander
  • When pondering a description for
  • space-time this individual decides
  • to plot time as an abstract orthogonal
  • dimension to the two dimensions of space
    known in
  • the Flatlander world

  • This requires three pieces of information
  • to identify an event
  • (x,y) coordinates for
  • position and a
  • (z) coordinate for time

8
Flatlander
  • A series of events are depicted as a Worldline


9
Flatlander
  • A point tangent to the Worldline defines
  • the 3-Velocity, which is normalized to a
    value of 1


10
Flatlander
  • The observed (2D) velocity is depicted by the
    blue
  • vector that lies in the plane of the
    observable
  • dimensions


11
Flatlander
  • The orientation of the 3-Velocity vector can
    be
  • determined from its angle ( ) relative to
    the 2D
  • observable plane of the Flatlander world


12
Gravitation
  • If a Worldline is due to gravitation, the
    challenge
  • becomes to accurately describe the curvature
    of
  • space and spacetime to accurately depict the
  • curve of the Worldline
  • The simplest case (a uniform spherical non
    rotating mass
  • with no charge) requires the Schwarzschild
    solution


13
Initial Alternative
Scenario Scenario
  • When pondering a description for space-time
  • this individual decided to plot time as an
  • abstract orthogonal dimension to the two
  • known dimensions of space in the Flatlander
  • world
  • This individual decides to
  • account for time within the
  • 2 observed dimensions by
  • plotting time not as a point but
  • as a segment representing the
  • passage of time


14
Initial Alternative
Scenario Scenario
  • This approach also requires
  • three pieces of information
  • to identify an event
  • (x,y) coordinates for position
  • A line segment plotted on the x-y
  • plane to designate time

  • Three pieces of information are required
  • to identify an event
  • (x,y) coordinates for position and a
  • (z) coordinate for time

15
Initial Alternative
Scenario Scenario
  • For an object at rest, its Worldline is
  • orthogonal to the x-y plane
  • For an object at rest, the
  • (x,y) ordered pair defines
  • a point at the center
  • of the time segment


16
Initial Alternative
Scenario Scenario
  • As viewed from above, the
  • three points may be seen
  • plotted on the 2D plane
  • A series of events are depicted as a
  • Worldline


17
Flatlander3D vs. 2D
  • A series of events are depicted as a Worldline

18
Flatlander3D vs. 2D

19
Flatlander3D vs. 2D

20
Flatlander3D vs. 2D
  • A series of events are depicted as points
    embedded
  • in time segments

21
Initial
Alternative Scenario
Scenario
  • A series of events are
  • depicted by ever-increasing
  • time lines
  • A series of events are depicted as a
  • Worldline


22
Initial Alternative
Scenario Scenario
  • The orientation of the
  • point relative to the
  • timeline is denoted as (X)
  • and is equivalent to the
  • value
  • The orientation of the 3-Velocity vector
  • can be determined from its angle ( )
  • relative to the 2D observable plane of
  • the Flatlander world

23
The ISM Orientation (X)
  • The position of the timeline segment can
    change
  • relative to the (x,y) position coordinates

(X) 0.5
24
The ISM Orientation (X)
  • The position of the timeline segment can
    change
  • relative to the (x,y) position coordinates

(X) 0.75
25
The ISM Orientation (X)
  • The position of the timeline segment can
    change
  • relative to the (x,y) position coordinates

(X) 1.0
26
The ISM Orientation (X)
  • The position of the timeline segment can
    change
  • relative to the (x,y) position coordinates

(X) 0.75
27
The ISM Orientation (X)
  • The position the timeline segment can change
    relative to the (x,y) coordinate

(X) 0.5
28
What is the Relationship between ? and X ?
  • Both ( ) and (X) represent orientations
  • They are related by the following expression


29
Does (X) Have a Physical Meaning?
  • ANSWER
  • X has allowable values ranging from 0.5 to 1

(X) 1.0
(X) 0.5
30
3D Spacetime
  • 2 1 dimensions in the Flatlander world can
  • be expressed in 2 dimensions with no
  • information lost
  • 4-Vector Space-Time may be expressed
  • within the 3 spatial dimensions we
  • experience
  • So What? Who Cares? Where is the
  • advantage of this?


31
Gravitation in 3D Spacetime
  • When using ISM, time is not defined as
    orthogonal
  • to the spatial dimensions
  • A time segment with a defined point is
    equivalent to
  • the 4-Vector Worldline
  • The orientation of the point (X) is related to
    the
  • velocity of an object just as the slope of
    the
  • Worldline is related to velocity
  • Just as gravity influences the 4-Vector
    Worldline,
  • gravity must also be shown to influence the
    value
  • of X in ISM
  • Who c


32
Conditions of 3D Gravitation
  • The mass of the electron is normalized to the
  • electron charge
  • From this, a fundamental quantum mass is
  • defined as
  • The quantum values for mass, length and time
    are
  • different manifestations of the same
    fundamental
  • entity, dubbed the energime
  • From this, an argument may be made that matter
  • decays to free space


33
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
  • How do you determine the
  • directionality of the time segment?

34
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
  • Apply a factor of pi.

35
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
  • Time (Space from the decay of matter) emerges
    from
  • everywhere within the Initial Singularity

36
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
  • Time progresses as a quantized entity
    defining
  • quantized space

37
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
38
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
39
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
40
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
The collective effort results in the creation of
an overall flat Background Energime Field (BEF)
41
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
Flat Background Energime Field (BEF)
42
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
Perturbation due to local effects of a
gravitating mass resulting in a Local Energime
Field (LEF)
Flat Background Energime Field (BEF)
43
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
Gravitation is an interaction between a local
gravitating mass and the total mass-energy of the
universe
44
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
As time progresses, the initial singularity
increases in size as the scaling metric changes.
45
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
46
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
47
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
48
The Nature of ISM Gravitation
Fundamental Unit Time
Fundamental Unit Length
49
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • Velocity is typically determined by the
  • orthogonal relationship between 4-Velocity
  • and the observed 3-Velocity

50
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • If you attempt to subtract the 3-Velocity
  • from the 4-Velocity linearly, you will not
    get
  • the correct answer

51
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • If you attempt to subtract the 3-Velocity
  • from the 4-Velocity linearly, you will not
    get
  • the correct answer

a
b
52
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • However, if you apply a scaling factor, you
  • can achieve a linear relationship between 4-
  • Velocity and 3-Velocity

53
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • However, if you apply a scaling factor, you
  • can achieve a linear relationship between 4-
  • Velocity and 3-Velocity

a
b
54
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF
  • ANSWER The ISM Scaling Metric (M),
  • relative to the Fundamental Unit Length (L),
  • defines the magnitude of the Scaling Factor
  • required to make a b.


Fundamental Unit Length (L)
Fundamental Unit Time (T)
ISM Scaling Metric (M)
Scaling Factor M/L
55
ISM Suggests a Linear Relationship between BEF
and LEF


Fundamental Unit Length (L)
Fundamental Unit Time (T)
ISM Scaling Metric (M)
Scaling Factor M/L
56
Gravitation Gravitation
31 D 4 1 D
  • If a Worldline is due to gravitation,
  • the challenge becomes to
  • accurately describe the curvature of
  • space and space-time to accurately
  • depict the curve of the Worldline
  • The simplest case (a uniform
  • spherical non rotating mass with no
  • charge) requires the Schwarzschild
  • solution
  • In the case of ISM, an object
  • under the influence of
  • gravitation must have a
  • specific value of X
  • The value of X and therefore
  • the geometry of ISM
  • space-time is defined by


57
ISM Relationships
  • Fundamental quantum mass
  • Electron mass
  • Proton mass


58
ISM Relationships
  • Age of the Universe
  • Redshift
  • Mass Density


59
ISM Relationships
  • Gravitation Constant (G)
  • Plancks Constant (h)
  • Coulombs Constant (k)
  • Electron (mass and charge)
  • Fundamental Quantum (mass, length, time) 1


60
ISM Relationships


61
Conclusions
  • All of the information in 4-Vector space-time
    can
  • be captured in 3 spatial dimensions by
    incorporating
  • a quantized time segment (ring)
  • with an orientation value (X)
  • The relationship between time and (X) defines
  • velocity
  • ISM coordinates are consistent with a new
    formalism
  • for gravitation
  • ISM is supported by observational data


62
Observational Support for ISM
A quantum theory of gravity Physical explanation of the fine structure constant
A university that is 14.2 billion years old A new interpretation of objectivity and local causality
An accelerating rate of expansion Absolute definition of mass, distance and time
Inflationary epoch falling naturally out of expansion A link between gravitation and electrostatic force
A clear definition of the initial singularity A link between gravitation and strong nuclear force
A physical definition of space Defined relationship between energy and momentum
A physical definition of Cold Dark Matter Explanation of the effects of Special Relativity
A physical explanation of Dark Energy 4-Vectors expressed in a 3D ISM coordinate system
About PowerShow.com