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Meeting of Assistant Professors

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Title: Meeting of Assistant Professors


1
Meeting of Assistant Professors
  • April 23, 2013

2
Faculty and Academic Affairs Leadership
  • Joan Cangiarella, M.D., Associate Dean for
    Faculty and Academic Affairs
  • Georgeann McGuinness, M.D., Director for Clinical
    Faculty Mentoring
  • Naoko Tanese, Ph.D., Director for Basic Science
    Faculty Mentoring

3
Agenda
  • Review of Faculty Tracks
  • Criteria for Promotion on the Non Tenure Track
    (CI/E and R/E)
  • Criteria for Promotion and Tenure on the Tenure
    Track (IC/E and I/E)
  • Third and Sixth Year Reviews
  • Mentoring

4
REVIEW OF FACULTY TRACKS
5
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6
Primary Themes Tenure Tracks
  • Investigator / Educator Track, a full-time tenure
    track for those faculty members in any department
    whose primary career is in independent,
    investigator-initiated research and who devote
    some time to education and service.
  • Investigator Clinician / Educator Track, a
    full-time tenure track for those faculty in the
    clinical departments whose primary career
    combines independent research with clinical
    activities and who devote some time to education
    and service.

7
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8
Primary Themes Non Tenure Tracks
  • Clinician Investigator / Educator Track, a
    full-time non-tenure track for those faculty
    members in clinical departments whose primary
    career is in the provision of clinical care and
    who devote a substantial portion of their efforts
    to teaching, research, and service.
  • Research / Educator Track, a full-time non-tenure
    track for those faculty members in any department
    whose primary career is in research, but who
    devote a portion of their efforts to education
    and service.

9
NYU School of Medicine Faculty
ELG TEN NEL TOTAL
CLINICAL 93 245 4,445 4,783
BASIC SCIENCE 63 120 349 532
TOTAL 156 365 4794 5,315
  • 886 full time faculty on the non tenure track
  • 752 CI/E
  • 134 R/E
  • 156 faculty on the tenure track
  • 91 I/E
  • 57 IC/E
  • 8 Library

10
Revision to the Policies and Procedures for
Appointment, Promotion and Tenure at the School
of Medicine (Revised February 1, 2013)
  • Revisions in 2013 new non-tenure track pathway
    for library faculty (http//faculty.med.nyu.edu/pr
    omotion-tenure)

11
CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION ON NON TENURE TRACK
12
Criteria for Promotion (Non Tenure Track)
Excellence in research (Clinician Researchers or
Researchers)
Excellence in Teaching (Educators)
Excellence in Clinical Care (Clinicians)
  • Serving as a collaborating investigator in a
    clinical trial, scientific or educational
    research that aides in obtaining or renewing
    grant funding for the institution
  • Directing a core research facility
  • Selection as a grants reviewer at the national or
    regional level
  • Invited lectures/presentations/visiting
    professorship
  • Teaching portfolio including medical, graduate
    and post-graduate teaching activities beyond
    Artman II requirement
  • Exceptional mentorship and training of students
  • Teaching awards
  • Leadership in medical student or
    residency/fellowship programs
  • Development of innovative curriculum
  • Election to distinguished medical societies
  • Leadership in professional societies
  • Invitations to lecture at national and
    international meetings
  • Development of new clinical treatments or
    concepts

Excellence in Service
  • Contributions to education administration
  • Distinguished service as program, course or
    clinical service director
  • Service on hospital or school committees

13
CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE ON THE TENURE
TRACK
14
Criteria for Promotion and Tenure (Tenure Track)
National and International recognition
  • Sustained and substantial funding from national
    peer-reviewed funding agencies (NIH, NSF,
    government and private sector)

Teaching
Service
  • Invitations to lecture at national and
    international meetings
  • Membership on editorial boards of prominent
    journals
  • Membership on research peer review and scientific
    and professional advisory committees
  • Receipt of honors for scientific and scholarly
    achievements
  • Extraordinary distinction as educators
  • Attraction of productive graduate students and
    postdoctoral fellows
  • Artman II requirements

Hospital and school committees
  • Development of a upward trajectory with renewal
    of NIH funding
  • Publication of major peer-reviewed papers first
    and last author

Innovators Breakthrough in technology or education
15
Third- and Sixth-Year Reviews
  • Reviews are conducted for all full-time tenure
    eligible faculty
  • The Deans office notifies the Chair when a
    review is due
  • The review is conducted by the Chair and the
    Departmental Appointments and Promotions
    Committee
  • If tenure is considered unlikely, the Chair meets
    with the faculty member to discuss his/her
    options
  • The Chair notifies the Dean and faculty member of
    the outcome of the meeting in writing

16
Formal review by Chair/DAPC on progress towards
tenure
Formal review by Chair/DAPC. If likelihood of
tenure is poor, discussion with faculty re
change of track
DRAFT / CONFIDENTIAL
17
Tenure Decisions
  • NIH Grants, including evidence of renewal
  • Federal grants (non-NIH) and non federal grants
  • Peer reviewed publications (especially 1st or
    last-author publications)
  • Innovative technologies
  • Non-peer reviewed publications
  • Book chapters
  • Abstracts
  • Presentations

18
TENURE STATISTICS
  • T9 T5 (FIRST FIVE YEARS OF PROBATION)
  • The data show that for the period T9 to T5, there
    are no statistically significant differences
    between those candidates awarded tenure and those
    candidates denied tenure for any of the metrics
    studied.
  • T5 T0 (FIVE YEARS LEADING UP TO TENURE REVIEW)
  • The data also show that for the period T5 to T,
    there are statistically significant differences
    between those candidates awarded tenure and those
    candidates denied tenure for all of the metrics
    studied.

19
Tenure Extensions
  • A faculty member on the tenure track whose
    progress for completion of the requirements for
    tenure has been impacted by Super storm Sandy can
    ask for an extension of the tenure clock for up
    to three years. Criteria for eligibility
    include
  • Loss of animals
  • Loss of key reagents
  • Loss of data
  • Loss of key technology
  • Loss of access to important collaborators
  • Physical relocation of laboratories

20
RESEARCH AND TEACHING EXPECTATIONS
21
Performance Standards for Research Faculty
  • In 2009, the School of Medicine accepted the
    recommendations of the AEC and implemented the
    Policy on Performance Expectations for Research
    Faculty, which defined expectations for research
    faculty productivity (gt25 effort in research),
    adopting metrics utilized at peer institutions.
    The process for evaluating research faculty
    involves multiple steps and engagement of the
    faculty, Chairs, and the Deans Office.

2011 Faculty Affairs Survey Page 14
22
Performance Standards for Research Faculty (AEC)
  • Basic and clinical science departments
  • Minimum of 60 of research salary supported on
    extramural funds
  • Policy on Performance Expectations for Research
    Faculty http//webdoc.nyumc.org/nyumc/files/efaa/
    attachments/policyonPerformanceExpectationsforRese
    archFaculty_FINAL.pdf

23
Teaching Expectations (Artman II)
  • In order to be considered for credit in excess
    of Artman II, a faculty member must first
    fulfill his/her expected teaching obligations
    through the following
  • Minimum of 50 contact hours (200 effort hours)
    annually, if requested. Of the 50 contact hours,
  • At least 10 hours must be in formal courses in
    undergraduate medical education (UME)
  • At least 10 hours must be in formal courses in
    the graduate school (Sackler Institute)
  • Policy on Expectations Regarding
    Teachinghttp//webdoc.nyumc.org/nyumc_d6/files/fa
    culty/Policy_on_Expectations_Regarding_Teaching_re
    vised_6.13.pdf

24
Mentoring
25
Faculty Mentoring at NYULMC A New Paradigm

Georgeann McGuinness, MD Naoko
Tanese, PhD Director of Clinical Faculty
Mentoring Director of Basic Science Faculty
Mentoring Office of Education, Faculty and
Academic Affairs
26
Task Force on Faculty Mentoring
  • Mentoring is
  • Vital to faculty development
  • Valuable to departments and the institution
  • Integral to being a world class institution
  • An expectation of the institution and the Dean
  • The Task Force on Faculty Mentoring formed in
    2011 with the intention of developing successful
    faculty mentoring programs for junior and mid
    level faculty

27
Task Force on Faculty Mentoring
  • Examine the status of faculty mentoring across
    the institution
  • Document baseline expectations of departmental
    mentoring obligations
  • Create and facilitate implementation of
    institution-wide mentoring programs
  • Delineate goals and responsibilities for all
    involved parties
  • Deans, Chairs, Mentors, Mentees

28
Office of Mentoring Faculty Development
  • Directors of Clinical and Basic Science Faculty
    Mentoring
  • Steering Committee
  • Representatives from key faculty bodies
  • Departmental Mentoring Champions
  • Identified and charged by Chairs
  • Responsible to assess need, implement, provide
    oversight and monitor effectiveness of
    departmental mentoring programs
  • Identify develop a pool of appropriate
    mentors
  • Champions will participate in institutional
    mentoring initiatives

29
Department Mentoring Champion
Anesthesiology Levon Capan
Biochemistry Molecular Pharmacology Nicholas Cowan
Cardiothoracic Surgery Ralph Mosca
Cell Biology E. Lyn Wilson
Child Adolescent Psychiatry Sarah Horwitz
Dermatology Nicholas Soter
Ehrman Medical Library Neil Romanosky
Emergency Medicine Maureen Gang
Environmental Medicine George Thurston
Medicine David Stern
Microbiology Naoko Tanese
Neurological Surgery Douglas Kondziolka
Neurology Katherine Henry
OBGYN William Schweizer
Ophthalmology Roland Smith
Orthopedic Surgery Thorsten Kirsch
30
Department Mentoring Champion
Otolaryngology Susan Waltzman
Pathology Aylin Simsir, Maria Aguero-Rosenfeld
Pediatrics Arthur H. Fierman
Physiology and Neuroscience Gyorgy Buzsaki
Plastic Surgery David T. Chiu
Population Health Mark D. Schwartz
Psychiatry Mary Anne Badaracco (clinical), Donald Goff (research)
Radiation Oncology Peter B. Schiff
Radiology Georgeann McGuinness
Rehab Medicine Alex Moroz
Surgery Mark Hochberg
Urology Ellen Shapiro
Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine Steve Burden
Cancer Institute Howard Fine, Mark Philips
Neuroscience Institute Gyorgy Buzsaki
31
Your Role as Mentee
  • Define expectations for yourself and your mentor
  • Discuss these early
  • Provide your mentor with information beyond your
    CV that will enhance the productivity of your
    meetings
  • Your own vision, mission, or life goals
  • Be respectful of time
  • Agree on the frequency of meetings you make the
    appointments
  • Maintain a sense of humor and enjoyment
  • Internalize positive and negative feedback
  • Expect to be held accountable to goals and
    deadlines this is very valuable to you!
  • Be grateful express thanks for the time and
    effort and expertise your mentor has voluntarily
    extended

32
Overview Mentoring TT Faculty
  • Mentoring team of at least 2 tenured faculty
  • Minimum 2 meetings / year
  • At least one of 2 meetings should be the team
  • Remainder can be meetings with individuals
  • Focus on metrics for Investigator Educator (IE)
    or Investigator/Clinician/Educator (ICE) track

33
Overview Mentoring Non TT Faculty
  • Mentors
  • Can be a single mentor
  • Can be group mentoring, faculty development
    programs, etc.
  • Ideally 2 meetings / year
  • Focus on metrics and career development for
    Clinician Investigator Educator (CIE) or Research
    Educator (RE) track

34
The Mentoring Toolbox
  • The Faculty Mentoring Handbook
  • Catalogue of Faculty Development Resources
  • A Guide for Chairs
  • Templates for
  • Mentoring Encounters
  • Yearly Letters
  • Departmental Faculty Surveys

35
The Faculty Mentoring Handbook
  •  
  •  Definition of a Mentor and Mentoring
  • What Does it Mean to Be a Mentor, and Why Be One?
  •  The Mentoring Process
  • Setting up a Mentoring Program
  •  Guide to Mentoring According to Career Path
  • Mentoring On the Tenure Track
  • Mentoring Off the Tenure Track
  •  The Role and Responsibility of the Mentee
  •  Overview of the Promotion Process

36
Faculty Development Resources
  • A centralized catalogue and database of existing
    programs and other resources available at the
    NYULMC
  • (OSR, CTSI, ODL, Other)
  • Developing mentors
  • Developing junior faculty
  • Leadership development and succession planning
  • Developing as a researcher

37
Conclusion
  • Mentoring is integral to the success of world
    class academic medical centers
  • An effective mentoring program will benefit you
    and your department
  • Providing a nurturing work environment
  • Advancing professional growth and achievement
  • Increasing career satisfaction of mentors and
    mentees
  • Developing the next generation of leaders
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