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Text Sets North Carolina Department of Public Instruction English Language Arts Department

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Title: Text Sets North Carolina Department of Public Instruction English Language Arts Department


1
Text Sets North Carolina Department of Public
Instruction English Language Arts Department
2
Agenda
  • Introduction and Review of Agenda
  • Text Sets and Lesson Design
  • Text Sets and the Standards
  • Criteria for Constructing a Text Set
  • Morning Break (15 minutes)
  • Lesson Featuring a Text Set
  • Steps to Creating a Text Set
  • LUNCH (1200 100)
  • Example Text Sets
  • Pattern Folder Activity
  • Afternoon Break (15 minutes)
  • A Text Set in Action
  • Reflection

3
Participant Notes
  • You will find the participant notes on our
    LiveBinder

4
CREATING
TEXT
SETS
5
Resources
  • Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading
    (Harvey Smokey Daniels and Nancy Steineke)
  • Teaching with Text Sets (Mary Ann Cappiello and
    Erika Thulin Dawes)
  • Common Core Curriculum Maps English Language Arts
    (Common Core)

6
Line of Inquiry
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Text Set
W.11-12.1b
W.11-12.5
RUBRIC
LESSON
W.11-12.9
RI.11-12.1
7
Line of Inquiry
Text Set
W.11-12.1b
W.11-12.5
RUBRIC
LESSON
W.11-12.9
RI.11-12.1
Line of Inquiry
8
Defining
  • What is Text? The term text refers to anything
    that a teacher can use to center instruction,
    anything that students can read, view, listen to,
    or explore, including books, photographs, films,
    articles, music, art, and more.
  • What is a Text Set? A text set is a collection
    of related texts organized around a topic or line
    of inquiry.
  • A text set includes information in many
    modalities, including print, audio, visual.
    Examples could be podcasts, news footage,
    photographs, drawings, artifacts, sculptures, and
    paintings, including primary sources.

9
Text Sets and the Standards
  • The Standards focus on building student ability
    to read and understand grade-level complex text
    and express that understanding clearly through
    writing and speaking.
  • The Standards emphasize the role of close
    engagement with text in students building
    knowledge about the world.
  • A coherent sequence of texts around a clear topic
    or line of inquiry will support students in
    building vocabulary and background knowledge.
  • Text sets are one tool for educators in planning
    units of instruction to help students meet the
    demands of the Standards.

10
Shifts
  • Building knowledge through content-rich
    nonfiction and informational texts
  • Reading and writing grounded in evidence from the
    text
  • Regular practice with complex text and its
    academic vocabulary

11
Where does using multiple texts appear in the
Standards?
  • Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • R.CCR.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented
    in diverse media and formats, including visually
    and quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • R.CCR.9 Analyze how two or more texts address
    similar themes or topics in order to build
    knowledge or to compare the approaches the
    authors take.

12
  • Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge
  • W.CCR.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained
    research projects based on focused questions,
    demonstrating understanding of the subject under
    investigation.
  • W.CCR.8 Gather relevant information from multiple
    print and digital sources, assess the credibility
    and accuracy of each source, and integrate the
    information while avoiding plagiarism.

13
  • Speaking and Listening Comprehension and
    Collaboration
  • SL.CCR.2 Integrate and evaluate information
    presented in diverse media and formats, including
    visually, quantitatively, and orally.

14
What are your ideas?
  • With your table group, discuss
  • How have you used multiple texts to teach the
    Standards?
  • And, what challenges might teachers face in your
    district with using multiple texts?

15
Dan Sparlin
  • New additions to the
    WiseOwl collection of resources
  • Contact Dan.sparlin_at_dpi.nc.gov

16
Text Sets in K-12 Classrooms
  • Elementary Across Genres / Integrated approach
  • Middle Grades Across Genres / Team Approach
  • High School Across Genres

17
Why Create a Text Set
  • To capture interests and cultivate engagement
  • To prompt inquiry
  • To read for multiple perspectives
  • To build prior knowledge
  • To encourage student writing Text sets as mentor
    texts
  • To differentiate instruction
  • To support vocabulary development

18
Criteria
  • Constructing a text set requires considering
    three criteria
  • A variety based on text complexity
    considerations.
  • Various cultural perspectives may be appropriate
    for some concepts.
  • Differences that offer various approaches to the
    big idea or conceptual understanding that
    unifies the conceptual text set.
  • Donham, J. (2013). Text Sets, Deep Learning, and
    the Common Core. School Library Monthly, 29(6),
    5-7.

19
1. Text Complexity
  • The Standards assert that Lexile scores alone are
    not a measure of complexity.
  • A text set might include titles that differ in
  • 1. Qualitative Measures
  • 2. Quantitative Measures
  • 3. Reader and Task

20
Navigating Text Complexity
21
2. Cultural Perspectives
  • Text sets provide multiple perspectives on
    complex issues. They show students that there are
    different "truths" and thus emphasize the
    importance of questioning dominant
    interpretations. (Annenberg Learner)

22
3. Conceptual Understanding
  • Central to the text set is the big unifying idea.
    To meet the expectation of the Standards for deep
    learning, this core idea is considered
    conceptual. A concept has several important
    attributes

23
Conceptual Understanding
  • A concept is an abstract idea.
  • A concept has complexity in that it may have
    multiple dimensions or attributes.
  • A concept transfers across time and place.
  • A concept is learned through inferential and
    inductive thinking.

24
  • Linda Crafton (1991) wrote when readers read
    texts that are conceptually related in some way,
    they are engaged in an exploration of cognitive
    and linguistic ties.

25
Break
26
Text Set Lesson
  • Words We Live By Your Annotated Guide to the
    Constitution by Linda R. Monk

Originally published in New York Hyperion,
2003.
27
  • What is (and isnt) the meaning of popular
    sovereignty? Why does Monk claim that this is
    the form of government in America?
  • Standards RI.6-8.4-6

28
Is Lucy Stone confused when she asks Which We
the People? Why does Monk say this question
has troubled the nation? Standards
RI.6-8.5-6
29
  • What evidence is there in this paragraph
    regarding Marshalls claim about the evolving
    nature of the constitution?
  • Standard RI.6-8.1

30
  • The Focusing Question for Writing
  • Explain how the notion of who the people were
    has changed over time in America? Use evidence
    from the text to support your explanation.
  • Anchor Standards R.CCR.3-6 and W.CCR.2,
    4, 5, 9

31
One Composition for Lesson Design
  1. Briefly introduce lesson
  2. Read
  3. Reread
  4. Ask text-dependent questions
  5. Provide opportunities for text-based writing

32
This lesson
  • allows the mystery and the adventure of the text
    to unfold,
  • chunks the text in a meaningful way,
  • includes scaffolding that doesnt simplify the
    text and asks questions that require evidence,
  • and provides keen focus on paragraphs, sentences,
    and words.

33
Steps to Creating Text Sets
34
Step One Identify the Anchor Text and Formulate
a Line of Inquiry for the Set
  • Determine the standards that you want to teach.
  • Identify an anchor text and formulate an overall
    line of inquiry for the set. This can happen in
    either order. An educator may first identify an
    anchor text, from which they formulate a line of
    inquiry for the set OR an educator may choose to
    first identify a topic for a unit of study and
    then seek out an anchor text around which to
    build the set.

35
Step One Continued
  • The most important part of step one is that the
    anchor text be a grade-level complex text that
    meets the complexity demands of the Standards and
    is worthy of the time and attention of students.
    Without a rich anchor text, it is difficult to
    create a worthwhile text set.

36
How Many Texts?
  • The number of texts in a set can vary depending
    on purpose and resource availability around a
    given topic.
  • What is important is that the texts in the set
    are connected meaningfully to each other to
    deepen student understanding of the anchor text.

37
Step Two Use Databases to Research Texts around
the Topic
  • Once you have identified the anchor text and line
    of inquiry for your set, you can use a variety of
    databases to search for texts.

38
Step Three Evaluate Texts for Inclusion in the
Set
  • 1. Does the text contribute to the students
    building a body of knowledge connected
    meaningfully to the anchor text?
  • 2. Is the text worthy of student time and
    attention?
  • 3. Does the text contribute to a range and
    balance of text types and formats in the overall
    set?
  • 4. Do the text complexity measures of the text
    place it in the grade band of the anchor text? A
    range of texts spanning the band will support
    student-knowledge-building over the course of the
    unit.

39
Step Four Refine, Finalize, and Produce Text Set
  • Continue to refine your selections until you are
    satisfied that you have a range and balance of
    texts that support student engagement with the
    line of inquiry.

40
Lunch
41
Examples of Text Sets
42
Guiding Questions for Text Sets
  • How are the texts related in a meaningful way?
  • What makes the texts rich worthy of rereading?
  • What are the range of text types?
  • Are there various degrees of complexity in the
    set?

43
Strong vs. Weak
Strong text sets Weak text sets
Build student knowledge about a topic meaningful connection to the anchor text Texts are not related or connected across sets or they are only superficially connected
Texts are authentic, rich, and worthy of study Only commissioned texts or textbook passages
Range of text types (literary and informational) and formats Focused exclusively on one genre or format (unless the set is a genre study)
Text complexity levels support student achievement of the grade-level complexity demands of the Standards Text complexity levels are erratic and do not support the staircase of text complexity in the Standards
44
Examples
Strong Text Set Weak Text Set
Anchor Text Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury Anchor Text Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
Related Texts You Have Insulted Me A Letter, Kurt Vonnegut (Informational) Burning a Book by William Stafford (Poem) The Book Burnings, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (Informational) Excerpts from The Book Thief, Marcus Zusak (Appendix B Exemplar) Learning to Read and Write, Frederick Douglass (Informational) Learning to Read, Malcolm X (Informational) Unto My Books So Good to Turn, Emily Dickinson (Poem) The Portable Phonograph, Walter Van Tilburg Clark Related Texts Chaos Gunman Ambushes, Kills Two Firefighters at New York Blaze, Catherine Shoichet and Greg Botelho (CNN) (Informational) Johannes Gutenberg and the Printing Press, Mary Bellis (About.com) (Informational) Fahrenheit 451, Francois Truffaut (Film) About Ray Bradbury Biography (Informational) The Pedestrian, Ray Bradbury (Literary) The Childrens Story, James Clavell (Literary)
45
Checking for Understanding
  • Write a question on one side of an index card
    about something you learned this morning.
  • Answer the question on the back of the card.
  • Trade questions with someone from another table
    and discuss your learning.

46
Pattern Folders A Literary Analysis Tool
47
Activity
Activity
How would you use this folder at your grade
level(s)?
48
Lesson
  • Lets take a look at how to use text sets within
    a lesson.

49
  • Painting
  • Primary Source Obituary
  • Primary Source Letter
  • Poetic Text Epitaph
  • Anchor Text O Captain! My Captain!
  • Sixth Text Student Choice
  • differentiation
  • formative assessment

50
Line of Inquiry
  • What differences and/or similarities do we see in
    the ways in which authors and artists present the
    subject through various media and genres? How do
    authors and artists successfully convey their
    presentations?

51
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52
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53
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54
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55
Thoughts?
56
  • On an index card, write
  • What parallels and contrasts stand out to you?
  •  
  • What new things do you see?
  • How does this change your hypothesis or
    interpretation? Explain.

57
Break
58
Essential Question
  • Discuss
  • What can the writer accomplish with words that
    the artist cannot accomplish with paints, and
    vice versa?

59
Culminating Activity
  • Write a summary comparing and contrasting the
    ways in which the authors characterized Lincoln,
    paying close attention to HOW they accomplished
    what they set out to do.
  • Cite evidence.

60
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61
What differences and/or similarities do we see in
the ways in which authors, artists, etc. present
Lincoln through various media and genres? How do
authors and artists successfully convey their
presentations?
ONE SOURCE ALL WEBSITES
Text Set
RL.6.9
RI.6.7
RUBRIC
LESSON
RI.6.9
W.6.9
62
Steps for Creating a Text Set
  • Working with your grade level group
  • Step 1 Identify the Anchor Text and Formulate a
    Line of Inquiry for the Set
  • Step 2 Use Databases to Research Texts around
    the Topic (Use WiseOwl and ELA LiveBinder Tabs
    Primary Sources, Using Informational Texts,
    Texts)
  • Step 3 Evaluate Texts for Inclusion in the Set
    (Use Navigating Text Complexity site)
  • Step 4 Refine, Finalize, and Produce Text Set

63
Steps for Creating a Text Set
  • Working with your grade level group
  • Step 1 Identify the Anchor Text and Formulate a
    Line of Inquiry for the Set
  • Step 2 Use Databases to Research Texts around
    the Topic (Use WiseOwl and ELA LiveBinder Tabs
    Primary Sources, Using Informational Texts,
    Texts)
  • Step 3 Evaluate Texts for Inclusion in the Set
    (Use Navigating Text Complexity site)
  • Step 4 Refine, Finalize, and Produce Text Set

64
Engaging Students with Primary Sources
65
Contact Information
  • Julie Joslin, Ed.D.
    Kristi Day, M.Ed
  • Section Chief
    K-5 ELA
  • English Language Arts
    Consultant
  • 919-807-3935
    919-807-3928
  • Julie.Joslin_at_dpi.nc.gov
    Kristi.Day_at_dpi.nc.gov
  • Lisa McIntosh, MSA
    Anna Lea Frost, M.Ed
  • K-5 ELA
    6-8 ELA
  • Consultant
    Consultant
  • 919-807-3895
    919-807-3952
  • Lisa.Llewellyn_at_dpi.nc.gov
    Anna.Frost_at_dpi.nc.gov
  • Angie Stephenson, M.Ed
  • 9-12 ELA
  • Consultant
  • 919-807- 3833
  • Angela.Stephenson_at_dpi.nc.gov
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