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Risk Management Department

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Risk Management Department Personal Protective Equipment April, 2008 Personal Protective Equipment Introduction Personal protection equipment is important. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Risk Management Department


1
Risk Management Department
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • April, 2008

2
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Introduction
  • Personal protection equipment is important. So
    important, that in 1994, OSHA (the Occupational
    Safety and Health Administration) established 29
    CFR 1910.132-138, the Personal Protection
    Equipment standard.
  • Briefly stated, this standard requires that
  • employers must establish and administer
  • an effective PPE (Personal Protection Equipment)
  • program for employees and that employees be
  • trained in the proper use of PPE

3
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Introduction
  • In addition, the State Workers Compensation Act
    requires injury benefits paid to an injured
    worker to be reduced by ten percent (10) if the
    employee failed to use safety equipment provided
    by his or her employer.

4
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Introduction
  • Further, the APS Safety Manual requires
    employees to recognize the hazards inherent in
    their jobs and abide by safety rules and safe
    work methods.
  • Employees responsibilities include
  • Take responsibility for personal safety and
  • safety of students and co-workers.
  • Follow all safety rules and procedures.
  • Use all personal protective equipment as
  • required.

5
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Introduction
  • There are several types of personal protective
    equipment. These include
  • Eye protection
  • Head protection
  • Hand Protection
  • Foot protection
  • Foot protection

6
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Your eyes are very delicate. You can think of
    them as the color television cameras for your
    brain. Like a camera, your eyes include
  • A lens that focuses light
  • An iris that controls the amount of light
  • that enters the eye
  • Receptors that "pick up" the image of
  • what you see
  • An optic nerve that transmits information
  • from the receptors in your eye to your brain

7
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Unlike a television camera that is made of
    plastic and metal, your eye is made of soft
    tissues and blood vessels. Damage your eyes, and
    you have big trouble. Trouble that can be
    permanent!.

8
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Objects striking the eye - Contact with
    chemicals and other hazardous materials -
    Being struck by objects
  • - Viewing radiant energy sources such as welding
    operations
  • - Dusts, Powders, Fumes, and Mists
  • - Small particles of matter can enter your eyes

9
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Toxic Gases, Vapors, and Liquids
  • Flying Objects or Particles
  • Electrical Hazards

10
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • To avoid serious eye damage, several types of
    eye protection are available
  • Safety Glasses
  • Goggles
  • Face Shield
  • Welding Mask
  • Absorptive lenses

11
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Safety Glasses
  • Most widely used type of eye protection
  • Stronger and resistant to impact and heat than
    regular glasses
  • Most have side shields that give you protection
    from hazards that may not be directly in front of
    you
  • Both prescription and nonprescription
  • safety glasses are available
  • Wide variety of lens coatings
  • are available for special work
  • situations

12
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Goggles
  • More protection than safety glasses because they
    fit closer to your face
  • Because goggles surround the eye area, they give
    you more protection in situations where you might
    encounter splashing liquids, fumes, vapors,
    powders, dusts, and mists
  • Different types of goggles are available
  • They must indicate that they are chemical
  • splash goggles to be worn for that purpose

13
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Face Shields
  • Face shields offer you full face protection and
    are often used around operations which expose you
    to molten metal, chemical splashes, or flying
    particles. Many face shields can be used while
    wearing a hard hat
  • NOTE You should always wear safety glasses or
    goggles when using a face shield for added
  • protection. Face shields alone are
  • NOT considered adequate eye
  • protection

14
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Welding helmets
  • Welding helmets provide both face and eye
    protection
  • Welding helmets use special absorptive lenses
    that filter the intense light and radiant energy
    that is produced during welding operations
  • As with face shields, safety glasses or
  • goggles should be worn when using a
  • welding helmet

15
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Eye Protection
  • Contact Lenses
  • If you wear contacts, keep the following safety
    tips in mind
  • You may not wear your contacts while using a full
    face respirator
  • Wear your contacts with caution if you work in
    areas where you might be exposed to fumes, dusts,
    powders, vapors, chemical splashes, molten
    metals, or intense heat, light or glare
  • If you get anything under your contacts, take
    time to remove and clean them. Follow your eye
    doctor's instructions for cleaning and caring for
    your contacts
  • Some chemicals can react with contacts and cause
    permanent injury
  • It is wise to keep an extra pair of contacts or a
    pair of glasses handy in case you should lose or
    damage one of your contacts while you are working

16
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Why Head Protection is Important
  • Your head is a very delicate part of your body.
    In and around your head are
  • - Your eyes, with which you see - Your ears,
    with which you hear - Your nose, with which you
    smell - Your mouth, with which you eat and
    speak and - Your brain, with which you think.
  • Injuries to the head are very serious. For this
    reason,
  • head protection and safety are very important.

17
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Impact to the Head
  • Falling or flying objects are a common cause of
    head injuries. Also, falling or walking into hard
    objects can cause head injuries. These injuries
    include neck sprains, concussions, and skull
    fractures.
  • Electrical Shocks
  • Accidents involving electricity result in
    electrical shocks and burns.
  • Splashes, Spills, and Drips
  • Toxic liquids such as acids, caustics, and
    molten metals can irritate and burn the eyes and
    skin.

18
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Hard hats protect you by providing the following
    features
  • A rigid shell that resists and deflects blows to
    the head
  • A suspension system inside the hat that acts as a
    shock absorber
  • Some hats serve as an insulator against
    electrical shocks
  • Shields your scalp, face, neck, and shoulders
  • against splashes, spills, and drips and
  • Some hard hats can be modified so you
  • can add face shields, goggles, hoods, or
  • hearing protection to them

19
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • There are four types of hard hats
  • Class A
  • Class B
  • Class C
  • Bump Caps

20
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Class A hard hats are designed to
  • Protect you from falling objects and
  • Protect you from electrical shocks up to 2,200
    volts.

21
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Class B hard hats are designed to
  • Protect you from falling objects and
  • Protect you from electrical shocks up to 20,000
    volts.

22
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Class B hard hats are designed to
  • Protect you from falling objects but
  • DO NOT protect you from electrical shocks and
  • DO NOT protect you from corrosive substances.

23
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Bump caps are made from lightweight plastic and
    are designed to protect you from bumping your
    head on protruding objects.
  • Bump caps DO NOT
  • Use a suspension system
  • Protect you from falling objects or
  • Protect you from electrical shocks.
  • WARNING You should never substitute
  • a bump cap for a hard hat.

24
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Head Protection
  • Hard Hats
  • Always wear your hard hat while you are working
    in areas where there are potential head  hazards.
    Adjust the suspension inside your hard hat so
    that the hat sits comfortably, but securely on
    your head.
  • Inspect the shell of your hard hat for cracks,
    gouges, and dents. Inspect the suspension
      system for frayed or broken straps. If your
    hard hat needs to be repaired, have it repaired
    immediately or ask your employer for a new one.
  • Never paint, scratch or drill "air holes" in your
    hard hat. You may apply reflective plastic tape
    if you must work at night. Never use metal tape
    on your helmet because it can conduct
    electricity.

25
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • It has been estimated that almost 20 of all
    disabling accidents on the job involve the hands.
    Without your fingers or hands, your ability to
    work would be greatly reduced.

26
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Traumatic Injuries - Tools and machines with a
    sharp edges can cut your hands. - Staples,
    screwdrivers, nails, chisels, and stiff wire can
    puncture your hands. - Getting your hands
    caught in machinery can sprain, crush, or remove
    your hands and fingers

27
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Contact Injuries
  • Coming into contact with caustic or toxic
    chemicals, biological substances, electrical
    sources, or
  • extremely cold or hot objects can
  • irritate or burn your hands

28
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Gloves
  • There are many type of gloves that are designed
    to protect your hands
  • Metal mesh gloves resist sharp edges and
    prevent cuts
  • Leather gloves protect you from rough surfaces
  • Vinyl gloves protect your hands against toxic
    chemicals

29
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Gloves
  • Padded cloth gloves protect your hands from
    sharp edges, slivers, dirt, and vibration
  • Heat resistant gloves protect your hands from
    heat and flames

30
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Gloves
  • Rubber gloves protect you from electrical
    shocks
  • Latex disposable gloves are used to protect
    your hands from germs and bacteria

31
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Wearing and Using Gloves
  • Select and use the right kind of glove for the
    job you are going to be performing.
  • Select gloves that fit.
  • Some gloves may be chemical specified and have a
    life expectancy. Discard them after the
    recommended time has expired.
  • Remove any rings, watches, or bracelets that
      might cut or tear your gloves.
  • Wash your hands before and after wearing your
    gloves.
  • Inspect your gloves before you use them. Look for
    holes and cracks that might leak.

32
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand Protection
  • Wearing and Using Gloves
  • Replace gloves that are worn or torn
  • After working with chemicals, hold your gloved
    hands under running water to rinse away any
    chemicals or dirt before removing the gloves.
  • Wash cotton gloves as needed.
  • Avoid borrowing gloves. Gloves are personal
    protective equipment.
  • Store gloves right side out in a clean, cool,
    dry, ventilated area.
  • Never wear gloves around powered rotating
    equipment - drills, lathes, etc.

33
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Without your feet and toes, your ability to work
    at your job would be greatly reduced.

34
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Impact Injuries If you have ever stubbed your
    toe, you know that impact injuries can hurt. At
    work, heavy objects can fall on your feet. If you
    work around sharp objects, you can step on
    something sharp and puncture your foot.

35
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Injuries from Spills and Splashes Liquids such
    as acids, caustics, and molten metals can spill
    into your shoes and boots. These hazardous
    materials can cause chemical and heat burns.

36
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Compression Injuries Heavy machinery, equipment,
    and
  • other objects can roll over your feet.
  • The result of these types of accidents
  • is often broken or crushed bones.

37
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Electrical Shocks Accidents involving
    electricity can cause severe shocks and burns.

38
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Extremes in Cold, Heat, and Moisture If not
    protected, your feet can suffer from frostbite if
    you must work in an extremely cold environment.
    Extreme heat, on the other hand, can blister and
    burn your feet. Finally,
  • extreme moisture in your shoes or
  • boots can lead to fungal infections.

39
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Potential Hazards
  • Slipping Oil, water, soaps, wax, and other
    chemicals can cause you to slip and fall.

40
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • There are many types of footwear that are
    designed to protect your feet
  • Steel toe footwear protects your toes from
    falling objects and from being crushed
  • Metatarsal footwear have special guards that
    run from your ankle to your toes and protect
    your entire foot.

41
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • There are many types of footwear that are
    designed to protect your feet
  • Reinforced sole footwear have metal
    reinforcement that protects your foot from
    punctures
  • Latex/Rubber footwear resists chemicals and
    provides extra traction on slippery surfaces

42
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • There are many types of footwear that are
    designed to protect your feet
  • PVC footwear protects your feet against
    moisture and improves traction
  • Electrical hazard footwear are insulated with
    tough rubber to prevent shocks and burns from
    electricity

43
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Select and use the right kind of footwear for the
    job you are going to be performing. Footwear
    should meet or exceed the standards set by ANSI
    (ANSI Z41-1991).
  • Avoid footwear made of leather or cloth if you
    work around acids or caustics. These chemicals
    quickly eat through the leather or cloth, and can
    injure your feet.
  • Select footwear that fits.
  • Inspect your footwear before you use them. Look
    for holes and cracks that might leak.

44
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Foot Protection
  • Replace footwear that are worn or torn.
  • After working with chemicals, hose your footwear
    with water to rinse away any chemicals or dirt
    before removing your footwear.
  • Avoid borrowing footwear. Footwear is personal
    protective equipment.
  • Store footwear in a clean, cool, dry, ventilated
    area.

45
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Types of Hearing Loss
  • Damage to the delicate structures of your ears
    can result in the loss of your ability to hear.
    There are two types of hearing loss
  • Conductive
  • Sensory

46
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Types of Hearing Loss
  • Conductive Hearing Loss
  • Conductive Hearing Loss is caused by
  • damage to or a malfunction of the outer
  • and middle ear. It results in a decrease
  • in your hearing, but you can still
  • understand speech.

47
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Types of Hearing Loss
  • Sensory Hearing Loss
  • Sensory Hearing Loss is caused by
  • damage to or a malfunction of the
  • inner ear, auditory nerve, or the brain.
  • It makes it more difficult to understand
  • speech, but it does not result in a
  • decrease in loudness.

48
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Types of Hearing Loss
  • Sensory Hearing Loss
  • Excessive noise is a cause of sensory hearing
    loss
  • Hearing loss in the workplace would most likely
    be a sensory hearing loss
  • Sensory hearing loss CANNOT be corrected
    medically or surgically. It is permanent

49
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • There are three main types of workplace hearing
    protection
  • Foam Earplugs
  • PVC Earplugs
  • Earmuffs

50
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Each type of hearing protection devices has its
    advantages and disadvantages.
  • The advantages of Foam and PVC earplugs are
  • 1. Small lightweight 2. Comfortable in hot
    environments and 3. Easily used with other
    safety equipment.
  • The disadvantages of earplugs are
  • 1. May work loose and require occasional refittin
    g 2. Require specific fitting instructions and
    3. Are frequently soiled.

51
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • Earmuffs are another type of hearing protection
    device. 
  • The advantages of earmuffs are
  • 1. Easy for your employer to supervise the
    wearing of this device 2. One size fits all
    and 3. Fits better for longer periods of time.
  • The disadvantages of earmuffs are
  • 1. May fit tight on your head 2. Uncomfortable
    in a warm environment and 3. Problems occur
    when used with other equipment.

52
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hearing Protection
  • When Should You Wear a Hearing Protection
    Device?
  • You should wear a hearing protection device
    whenever you are exposed to noise that is 85
    decibels or greater for an 8-hour period of time.

53
Personal Protective Equipment
  • You are finished!
  • You have finished the Personal Protective
    Equipment training.
  • Open the quiz from the link next to this
    presentation on the Risk Management Departments
    website Training page.
  • Print the form and be sure to write your name,
    location and employee number in the spaces
    provided.
  • Complete the ten questions and have your
    supervisor send it to the Risk Management office.
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