Improving quality of the Childcare Workforce - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Improving quality of the Childcare Workforce


1
Improving quality of the Childcare Workforce
Social mobility and life chances Oxford
Kathy Sylva University of Oxford
2
This presentation will explore
  • Impact of pre-school
  • Effects of quality of pre-school provision on
    children
  • Staff qualifications and their effect on
    childrens learning

3
Effective Provision of Pre-School EducationE P P
E
1997-2003, 2003-2008
  • Kathy Sylva University of Oxford
  • Edward Melhuish Birkbeck, University of London
  • Pam Sammons Institute of Education, University of
    London
  • Iram Siraj-Blatchford Institute of Education,
    University of London
  • Brenda Taggart Institute of Education, University
    of London
  • Karen Elliot Institute of Education, University
    of London

4
Questions explored in the EPPE research
  • What is the impact of pre-school on young
    childrens intellectual and social/behavioural
    development?
  • Are some pre-schools more effective than others?
  • Can pre-school experience reduce social
    inequalities?
  • What is the effect of workforce qualifications on
    childrens development?

5
Sample
  • Six local authorities
  • 141 Pre-school centres randomly selected within
    the authorities to include
  • nursery classes
  • playgroups
  • private day nurseries
  • day care centres run by local authority
  • nursery schools
  • fully integrated centres
  • Approx 2,800 children from 141 centres and 300
    home children

6
Plan of Study
Reception Year 1
Year 2 (5 yrs) (6 yrs)
(7 yrs)
Pre-school Provision (3yrs)
25 nursery classes 590
children
Baseline Assessment N 3,000 Exit Assessments
N 1500 Age 6 Assessments N 3,000 Age 7
Assessments N 3,000
34 playgroups 610 children
31 private day nurseries
520 children
20 nursery schools 520
children
24 local authority day care nurseries 430
children
7 integrated centres 190
children
home 310 children
7
Child Assessments at entry to the study (age 3.0
years to 4 years 3 months)
  • Cognition
  • British Ability Scales
  • Language
  • British Ability Scales
  • Social and behavioural development
    Cooperation/conformity, peer sociability,
    anti-social or upset behaviour.

8
Child Assessments at entry to school (age 4 to
5 years)
  • Cognition
  • British Ability Scales
  • Language
  • British Ability Scales
  • Numeracy
  • Early number skills
  • Literacy skills
  • Letter recognition, phonological awareness
  • Social/behavioural development
  • Cooperation, peer sociability,
    independence/concentration, anti-social or
    upset behaviour.

9
Sources of data
  • Child assessments over time
  • Family background information
  • Interviews with staff
  • Quality rating scales
  • Case studies of effective centres

10
Measuring Value Added
  • Multilevel models established the extent to which
    the pre-school centre influenced childrens
    progress.
  • Childrens progress was assessed controlling for
    prior attainment at age 3.
  • Child, parent, home learning environment
    factors were included in the analyses.
  • Child Measures
  • controlled for
  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • number of siblings
  • Family Measures
  • controlled for
  • eligibility to FSM
  • mothers highest level of qualification
  • highest social class

11
Measuring Value Added continued
  • Home Learning Environment Measures
  • frequency reading to child
  • frequency of library visits
  • frequency child paints/draws at home
  • frequency parent teaches letters/numbers
  • frequency parent teaches the alphabet
  • frequency parent teaches songs, nursery rhymes,
    etc
  • Other Measures
  • length of time in months spent in pre-school

12
Does type of pre-school experience matter?
  • Integrated centres and nursery schools are best
    for cognitive outcomes.
  • Integrated centres, nursery schools and nursery
    classes are best for social outcomes.

13
The impact of quality
  • How EPPE measures quality
  • Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale
    (ECERS-R total subscales)
  • ECERS-E (total subscales)
  • Caregivers Interaction Scale (4 subscales,
    e.g., punitiveness, detachment)

14
ECERS-E subscales by manager qualification
15
Staff qualifications and childrens learning
  • staff time at different levels (unqualified,
    level 2, level 3 4 and level 5) was tested in
    models.
  • For cognitive progress, staff contact time at
    level 5 was positive significant for outcome
    (pre-reading).
  • For social behavioural development staff
    contact time at level 5 was positive significant
    for Co-operation Conformity and also
    significantly associated with reductions in
    Anti-social / Worried behaviour
  • Level 5 degree level teacher (QTS)

16
After taking into account the impact of child,
family, home environment characteristicsat the
end of year 1
  • children from high quality pre-schools had higher
    reading attainment
  • children from pre-school centres with high
    ECERS-R subscale scores showed fewer Conduct
    problems
  • qualified teachers made a difference in
    childrens academic and social outcomes

17
A take-home message?
  • Children who stayed at home were more likely to
    be identified as at risk at the beginning of
    school than children who had attended some type
    of pre-school.
  • A pre-school of high quality can help children
    move out of cognitive risk by the start of
    primary school.
  • This positive impact remains evident at least
    until the end of Year 2.
  • The higher the staff qualifications, especially
    QTS, the more developmental progress children
    make in the pre-school period.

18
For further information on EPPE
  • Sammons, P., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I., Taggart, B Elliot, K.
    (2002). Technical Paper 8a Measuring the Impact
    of Pre-School on Childrens Cognitive Progress
    over the Pre-School Period. Institute of
    Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I., Taggart, B Elliot, K.
    (2003). Technical Paper 8b Measuring the Impact
    of Pre-School on Childrens Social/behavioural
    Development over the Pre-School Period. Institute
    of Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Smees, R., Taggart, B., Sylva, K.,
    Melhuish, E., Siraj-Blatchford, I., Elliot, K.
    (2004). EYTSEN Technical Report No.2. Institute
    of Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Taggart, B., Smees, R., Sylva, K.,
    Melhuish, E., Siraj-Blatchford, I., Elliot, K.
    (2003). The Early Years Transition and Special
    Educational Needs (EYTSEN) Project. DfES Research
    Report 431.
  • Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Sammons, P.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I. (2004). Effective
    Pre-school Education. DfES Research Report.

visit the EPPE website http//www.ioe.ac.uk/proje
cts/eppe
19
For further Information about EPPE visit the EPPE
website at http//www.ioe.ac.uk/projects/eppe
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Title: Improving quality of the Childcare Workforce


1
Improving quality of the Childcare Workforce
Social mobility and life chances Oxford
Kathy Sylva University of Oxford
2
This presentation will explore
  • Impact of pre-school
  • Effects of quality of pre-school provision on
    children
  • Staff qualifications and their effect on
    childrens learning

3
Effective Provision of Pre-School EducationE P P
E
1997-2003, 2003-2008
  • Kathy Sylva University of Oxford
  • Edward Melhuish Birkbeck, University of London
  • Pam Sammons Institute of Education, University of
    London
  • Iram Siraj-Blatchford Institute of Education,
    University of London
  • Brenda Taggart Institute of Education, University
    of London
  • Karen Elliot Institute of Education, University
    of London

4
Questions explored in the EPPE research
  • What is the impact of pre-school on young
    childrens intellectual and social/behavioural
    development?
  • Are some pre-schools more effective than others?
  • Can pre-school experience reduce social
    inequalities?
  • What is the effect of workforce qualifications on
    childrens development?

5
Sample
  • Six local authorities
  • 141 Pre-school centres randomly selected within
    the authorities to include
  • nursery classes
  • playgroups
  • private day nurseries
  • day care centres run by local authority
  • nursery schools
  • fully integrated centres
  • Approx 2,800 children from 141 centres and 300
    home children

6
Plan of Study
Reception Year 1
Year 2 (5 yrs) (6 yrs)
(7 yrs)
Pre-school Provision (3yrs)
25 nursery classes 590
children
Baseline Assessment N 3,000 Exit Assessments
N 1500 Age 6 Assessments N 3,000 Age 7
Assessments N 3,000
34 playgroups 610 children
31 private day nurseries
520 children
20 nursery schools 520
children
24 local authority day care nurseries 430
children
7 integrated centres 190
children
home 310 children
7
Child Assessments at entry to the study (age 3.0
years to 4 years 3 months)
  • Cognition
  • British Ability Scales
  • Language
  • British Ability Scales
  • Social and behavioural development
    Cooperation/conformity, peer sociability,
    anti-social or upset behaviour.

8
Child Assessments at entry to school (age 4 to
5 years)
  • Cognition
  • British Ability Scales
  • Language
  • British Ability Scales
  • Numeracy
  • Early number skills
  • Literacy skills
  • Letter recognition, phonological awareness
  • Social/behavioural development
  • Cooperation, peer sociability,
    independence/concentration, anti-social or
    upset behaviour.

9
Sources of data
  • Child assessments over time
  • Family background information
  • Interviews with staff
  • Quality rating scales
  • Case studies of effective centres

10
Measuring Value Added
  • Multilevel models established the extent to which
    the pre-school centre influenced childrens
    progress.
  • Childrens progress was assessed controlling for
    prior attainment at age 3.
  • Child, parent, home learning environment
    factors were included in the analyses.
  • Child Measures
  • controlled for
  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • number of siblings
  • Family Measures
  • controlled for
  • eligibility to FSM
  • mothers highest level of qualification
  • highest social class

11
Measuring Value Added continued
  • Home Learning Environment Measures
  • frequency reading to child
  • frequency of library visits
  • frequency child paints/draws at home
  • frequency parent teaches letters/numbers
  • frequency parent teaches the alphabet
  • frequency parent teaches songs, nursery rhymes,
    etc
  • Other Measures
  • length of time in months spent in pre-school

12
Does type of pre-school experience matter?
  • Integrated centres and nursery schools are best
    for cognitive outcomes.
  • Integrated centres, nursery schools and nursery
    classes are best for social outcomes.

13
The impact of quality
  • How EPPE measures quality
  • Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale
    (ECERS-R total subscales)
  • ECERS-E (total subscales)
  • Caregivers Interaction Scale (4 subscales,
    e.g., punitiveness, detachment)

14
ECERS-E subscales by manager qualification
15
Staff qualifications and childrens learning
  • staff time at different levels (unqualified,
    level 2, level 3 4 and level 5) was tested in
    models.
  • For cognitive progress, staff contact time at
    level 5 was positive significant for outcome
    (pre-reading).
  • For social behavioural development staff
    contact time at level 5 was positive significant
    for Co-operation Conformity and also
    significantly associated with reductions in
    Anti-social / Worried behaviour
  • Level 5 degree level teacher (QTS)

16
After taking into account the impact of child,
family, home environment characteristicsat the
end of year 1
  • children from high quality pre-schools had higher
    reading attainment
  • children from pre-school centres with high
    ECERS-R subscale scores showed fewer Conduct
    problems
  • qualified teachers made a difference in
    childrens academic and social outcomes

17
A take-home message?
  • Children who stayed at home were more likely to
    be identified as at risk at the beginning of
    school than children who had attended some type
    of pre-school.
  • A pre-school of high quality can help children
    move out of cognitive risk by the start of
    primary school.
  • This positive impact remains evident at least
    until the end of Year 2.
  • The higher the staff qualifications, especially
    QTS, the more developmental progress children
    make in the pre-school period.

18
For further information on EPPE
  • Sammons, P., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I., Taggart, B Elliot, K.
    (2002). Technical Paper 8a Measuring the Impact
    of Pre-School on Childrens Cognitive Progress
    over the Pre-School Period. Institute of
    Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I., Taggart, B Elliot, K.
    (2003). Technical Paper 8b Measuring the Impact
    of Pre-School on Childrens Social/behavioural
    Development over the Pre-School Period. Institute
    of Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Smees, R., Taggart, B., Sylva, K.,
    Melhuish, E., Siraj-Blatchford, I., Elliot, K.
    (2004). EYTSEN Technical Report No.2. Institute
    of Education, London.
  • Sammons, P., Taggart, B., Smees, R., Sylva, K.,
    Melhuish, E., Siraj-Blatchford, I., Elliot, K.
    (2003). The Early Years Transition and Special
    Educational Needs (EYTSEN) Project. DfES Research
    Report 431.
  • Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Sammons, P.,
    Siraj-Blatchford, I. (2004). Effective
    Pre-school Education. DfES Research Report.

visit the EPPE website http//www.ioe.ac.uk/proje
cts/eppe
19
For further Information about EPPE visit the EPPE
website at http//www.ioe.ac.uk/projects/eppe
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