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PBIS/Foundations: Creating Safe, Civil, and Productive Schools Welcome Riverview Gardens Secondary Schools! May 3 and 4, 2012

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Title: PBIS/Foundations: Creating Safe, Civil, and Productive Schools Welcome Riverview Gardens Secondary Schools! May 3 and 4, 2012


1
PBIS/Foundations Creating Safe, Civil, and
Productive SchoolsWelcome Riverview Gardens
Secondary Schools!May 3 and 4, 2012
  • Presented by Bob McLaughlin
  • boblaughs_at_yahoo.com

2
Riverview GardensFoundations Teams Module II
Common Areas
3
CHAMP for Today!!
  • Conversation
  • Help
  • Activity (and Objectives)
  • Movement
  • Participation

4
Team Homework for May
  • 1. Review and discuss Team Effectiveness
    Document. Make changes to team as needed.
  • Identify who represents whom---KEY.
  • 2. Discuss Surveys and Develop Plan to use.
  • 3. Start on Time Discuss and Decide.
  • 4. Discuss Guidelines for Success Plan.
  • 5. Update faculty/staff as to what you are about
    and what you are working on.
  • 6. Prepare a brief report/update for May.

5
Team Time Review and Report
  • Review Homework Tasks. Update progress to date.
  • Prepare Team Agenda for Team Time during
    sessions.
  • Report Out.

6
Remember Improvement Cycle
  • The Foundations Improvement Cycle

7
Common Areas Introduction
  • M2 P1 Introduction and Overview

8
Introduction
  • Good Foundations starting place for most schools
  • Important part of a safe, civil, and productive
    school
  • influence climate of entire school
  • common area behavior affects classroom behavior
  • Improving one problematic common area can
    energize and unify staff

9
What is a Common Area?
  • Lots of Supervisors some Paras

10
Understanding Common Areas
  • Other Examples Assemblies, Field trips, guest
    speakers, substitutes
  • Non Examples Classrooms, Library, ISS room

11
Understanding Common Area Misbehavior
  • Contributing Factors
  • Structural variables
  • physical setting, organization, procedures
    supervision arrangements
  • Expectations
  • for student behavior are not well-defined
  • Supervision practices
  • Lack of active supervision
  • Not enough scanning, listening to, circulating
    among, or interacting with students

12
Misbehavior Factors
  • Inconsistent responses to student misbehavior
  • Adversarial, emotional responses to student
    misbehavior
  • Failure to communicate expectation of compliance
    and cooperation
  • Students not respecting Para Professionals

13
How to Improve Common Areas?
  • Purpose and goal
  • Structural variables
  • Includes supervision arrangements and how
    organized
  • Defining and teaching student expectations
  • Effective supervision practices
  • Includes correction and encouragement

14
Process to Improve a Common Area
  • 1) Identify purpose and create goal
    statement
  • What do we want this setting to be like?
  • 2) Structure the Areas for Success (P2)
  • 3) Teach Responsible Behavior (P3)
  • 4) Provide Effective Supervision (P4)
  • 5) Train Effective Correction Procedures (P5)
  • 6) Identify Encouragement Procedures

15
Improvement Process
  • Develop a preliminary proposal for improving the
    common area
  • (observations/surveys/other data---rationale for
    area selected)
  • Present to staff for feedback
  • Revise as needed and use Improvement Cycle
  • Present revised proposal for adoption
  • If rejected implement procedures for getting an
    alternate proposal approved
  • Use the Improvement Cycle!

16
Improvement Process
  • Once a proposal has been adopted
  • Develop and execute an implementation plan that
    details
  • Revised structural variables, supervision
    arrangements
  • How training will be provided to supervisors
  • Emergency procedures
  • How behavioral expectations will be taught
  • Lessons developed and presented---How?
  • How effective supervision strategies will be
    communicated to all

17
Implementation Plan
  • How and when re-teaching will occur (e.g., for
    new students and/or students who are having
    continuing problems)
  • Procedures for assisting staff members and
    students in the initial stages of implementation
  • Foundations Recommendation At least two task
    force members available in the common area for
    the first few days of implementation to answer
    questions and work out any pressing problems

18
Implementation Plan
  • How impact of proposal will be evaluated
  • If staff members are not implementing the
    proposal as designed, provide staff members with
    encouragement/motivation/additional training
  • Document the proposal in writing
  • Foundations Recommendations
  • Prepare detailed descriptions of all policies and
    procedures for inclusion in the Foundations Team
    Comprehensive Notebook.
  • Prepare summaries of essential information for
    inclusion in the staff handbook.
  • Samples of written documentation for hallways,
    playground, cafeteria, and assemblies can be
    found in Appendix 3 (pages 17 to 25)-----Review
    and Discuss.

19
Policy Outline---6 Areas
  • 1. Clear Goal Statement for Area or
  • Activity
  • 2. Student Behavior Expectations
  • 3. Teaching Expectations
  • 4. Supervision Responsibilities
  • 5. Encouragement Procedures
  • 6. Correction Procedures

20
Team Time
  • What Common Area Needs Attention Soon?
  • Based on What Data or information?
  • Where are you in the cycle with this Common Area?
  • REPORT OUT.

21
Structuring Common Areas for Success
  • M2 P2

22
Introduction
  • Big picture
  • Supervision arrangements
  • Evaluate structures
  • organization, schedules, procedures
  • Evaluate expectations for students
  • Sample plan for managing hall behavior and
    reducing tardiness---Start On Time

23
Introduction
  • Importance of structurepoor structure increases
    student misbehavior
  • Crowding, Poor traffic flow, Long/unproductive
    time periods
  • Difficulties in considering the structure of
    common areas
  • Existing regularities
  • Requires timefor creative thought
  • Requires setting aside that cant work mentality

24
Ensuring Adequate Supervision
  • Adequate supervision a structural consideration
    because it must be arranged in advance
  • Consider number of supervisors
  • Size, complexity, specific situations
  • History, time of year---begin, breaks, new policy
  • Schedule
  • Placement
  • Emergency communication

25
Supervision Action Steps
  • Evaluate current supervision for each common
    area priority
  • Identify number of supervisors needed. Do we
    have?
  • Determine if supervision schedule is sufficient.
  • Identify location of supervisors strategically
    placed throughout the setting.
  • Ensure supervisors circulate unpredictably
    throughout setting.
  • Identify or develop clear emergency communication
    procedures for supervisors to use.
  • Provide supervisors training in established
    emergency communication procedures.

26
Team Time
  • Reflect on and Discuss all six action steps for
    evaluating Common Area Supervision as a
    Structural Variable
  • Report Out

27
Analyzing Structural and Organizational Variables
  • Structural and organizational features of common
    areas should be designed to enhance student
    productivity and facilitate effective adult
    supervision
  • Physical setting and materials
  • Layout of cafeteria tables/playground equipment
  • Entry and exit
  • Supervision going to and coming from a common
    area
  • Having a single entrance/exit into a common area

28
Structure and Organization
  • Schedule considerations
  • Too many or not enough recesses
  • Too much unstructured time
  • Passing periods too long
  • Crowding considerations
  • Too many students in space
  • Procedures
  • Emergency procedures
  • Equipment check-out procedures
  • Quiet-down procedures
  • Clean-up and dismissal procedures

29
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30
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32
Team Time
  • Reflect on and Discuss Organization and Structure
    of the Common Area. What might be changed?
  • Report Out

33
How To Improve Next Steps
  • Develop a written, comprehensive policy for each
    priority Common Area
  • Include all 6 components

34
1. Clear Goal Statement
  • Identify expectations
  • Easier to teach
  • Helps determine need
  • Examples provided

35
2. Clear Student Behavior Expectations
  • Complexity requires clarity
  • Age appropriate
  • Focus on GFS
  • Detailed
  • Include civility
  • Reasonable
  • Known by all staff and
  • students

36
Team Time
  • Discuss your Priority Common Area
  • Begin developing a Comprehensive Policy or Fine
    Tuning a current one
  • Address Goal and Expectation components
  • NOTE Use samples to help but make it your own.
  • REPORT OUT

37
Teaching Responsible Behavior in Common Areas
  • M2 P3

38
3. How will Expectations be Taught?
  • Teach expectations/rules for the Common Area and
    how to meet them.
  • Teach expectations during the first week of
    school, then as needed.
  • Develop clear lessons and a plan to implement
    them.

39
Introduction
  • Reasons for comprehensive lessons on common area
    behavioral expectations
  • Common areas complex settings/situations
  • Students need to be taught how to function in
    those settings/situations
  • Some common area settings/situations may be prone
    to particularly problematic behaviors
  • Hallways/Locker areas
  • Playground transitions
  • Problematic student behavior in common areas
    tends to negatively affect classroom behavior

40
Introduction
  • Additional considerations
  • Ensuring supervision that is consistent with the
    lessons on behavioral expectations
  • Arranging for the re-teaching of lessons, as
    needed
  • Ensuring that comprehensive lessons are taught,
    in instructional settings, to all students

41
Organizing to Ensure Expectations are Taught
  • Identify who will be responsible for designing
    lessons
  • Considerations when designing lessons
  • Making lessons age-appropriate
  • Including an adequate/appropriate amount of
    detail
  • Lessons for youngest students and/or students new
    to a school (e.g., 9th graders at a high school)
    should include more detail

42
Considerations When Designing Lessons
  • Distributing prioritized content across days
  • Common areas that are especially complex (e.g.,
    cafeteria and playground) are likely to require
    multiple lessons
  • Spread information out as needed
  • Covering needed content
  • The goal of the common area
  • Any written rules (as well as more detailed
    expectations)
  • Procedures used in the common area
  • Civility expectations
  • Responding to adults in authority/consequences

43
Considerations When Designing Lessons
  • Using effective lesson organization
  • Two sample lesson templates, for organizing
    lessons, can be found in Appendix 1.
  • Varying lesson activities
  • Skits
  • Whole group practice
  • Rubrics (using Guidelines for Success)
  • T-Charts

44
Launching and Implementing Lessons on Common Areas
  • A coordinated plan for introducing lessons on
    common areas will address
  • Who will teach the lessons
  • A schedule for teaching the lessons
  • Launching new expectations for common areas
  • Re-teaching lessons

45
Launching and Implementing Lessons on Common Areas
  • Options for who will teach the lessons
  • Classroom teachers
  • Lessons presented via live feeds
  • Older students teaching younger students
  • Lessons presented via videotape
  • Lessons presented during assemblies
  • Roving presenters
  • NOTE View videos 1 and 2 for some
  • examples (M2P3V1V2).

46
Launching New Expectations for Common Areas
  • Ensure that supervision is consistent with the
    expectations/lessons
  • Double the number of supervisors in the setting
    during the first week
  • Arrange for at least two follow-up observations
    in the setting
  • Celebrate!
  • Re-prioritize as needed

47
Organizing for Re-teaching Lessons
  • To students new to the school
  • Videotaped lessons
  • Peer/buddy system
  • Newcomers Club
  • To the entire student body
  • Before major vacations
  • After major vacations
  • Preparing for special days
  • Before, during and after major school-wide
    testing
  • Any time the situation appears to be breaking
    down

48
For Students Demonstrating Chronic Problems
  • Videotaped lessons
  • Using something like
  • Alternative recess
  • Re-teaching opportunity for class

49
Team Time
  • Discuss your Common Area Policy in Terms of How
    Lessons will Get Developed and Taught, Component
    3.
  • Continue working on Components 1 and 2 (goal and
    expectations).
  • Use information from samples to help but make
    your own.
  • NOTE Sample Policies and Sample Lessons
    provided.
  • REPORT OUT.

50
Effective Supervision---Part 1
  • Protect, Expect, and Connect
  • (M2 P4)

51
4. Ensure Effective Supervision
  • Adult presence increases rule-following behavior
  • Increases consistency
  • More feedback and correction
  • Implications for staff Need to know who, when,
    and how
  • Clarify any Emergency Procedures.
  • NOTE How will supervision expectations be
    taught?

52
Introduction
  • Reasons for focusing on staff behavior (i.e.,
    supervision) in common areas
  • Adult presence prompts rule-following
  • Student rule-following has a positive affect on
    safety and civility
  • A friendly adult presence
  • Promotes an invitational school climate
  • Promotes a spirit of cooperation
  • Promotes a sense of adult availability
  • Invites students to make contact

53
Introduction
  • Pre-requisites to providing effective supervision
  • Making arrangements for adequate supervision
    (e.g., number of supervisors)
  • Ensuring adequate supervision is covered in
    Module 2, Presentation 2
  • Providing lessons on behavioral expectations to
    students
  • Teaching responsible behavior in common areas is
    covered in Module 2, Presentation 3

54
Introduction
  • Focus of this presentationpreventative
    supervision practices
  • Practices to protect students.
  • Practices to expect responsible behavior.
  • Practices to connect with students
  • NOTE M2, P5 covers correction practiceswhat
    supervisors should do in response to student
    misbehavior.

55
Protecting Students
  • An effective supervisor will be there.
  • On time
  • In the common area, and ready to supervise,
    before students arrive. Committed.
  • Right placephysically
  • Coordinates assignments with others
  • Greets students as they enter common area
  • Spends more time in trouble spots
  • Circulates unpredictably throughout assigned area
  • Works the line when students required to wait.

56
Protecting
  • In the right placementally
  • Looking alert and being interactive
  • Supportive of other supervisors
  • Willing to investigate or ask for help with any
    safety/emergency situations
  • Knowledgeable about procedures for requesting help

57
Protecting
  • Effective supervisor will be aware
  • Uses visual scanning
  • Continually sweeping the setting/situation
  • Primarily scanning assigned area and others as
    needed
  • Focusing sweep on known trouble spots
  • Watching for unusual crowds, and investigates
    when something feels or looks wrong
  • Listening
  • Being sensitive to sounds in the area
  • Things getting too quiet
  • A surge of noise
  • A gradual, low level increase in noise

58
Protecting
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1. Arrange for supervisors to view and discuss
    all topics in Module 2, Presentations 4 and 5
  • 2. Have supervisors use checklist to self assess
    their skills---identifying strengths and
    improvement areas
  • Watch Videos 1, 3, and 2
  • NOTE Supervisory Skills Checklist can be found
    in Appendix 1 of M2 P5

59
Team Time
  • Discuss Videos.
  • Review Supervisory Skills Checklist Protect
    Section.
  • Discuss How To Protect Your Students. Any
    concerns or issues?
  • Report Out.

60
Expecting Responsible Behavior
  • Effective supervisors know the behavior
    expectations for the common area.
  • How students are expected to enter the setting
  • How students are expected to behave in setting
  • Rules and procedures------clear
  • For checking out equipment and paying for lunch
  • Civility expectations
  • Treating other students/adults/dress code
  • How students are expected to exit the setting.

61
Expecting
  • Effective Supervisors
  • Actively communicate high expectations for
    student behavior
  • Creating an assumption of cooperation and
    compliance Body Language and Voice Tone
  • Intervene early with low-level misbehavior
  • Proximity, Information
  • Make early and positive contact with potential
    (known) challenging students

62
Expecting
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1. Supervisors to view and discuss all the topics
    in Module 2, Presentations 4 and 5.
  • 2. Common area supervisors use self assessment
    checklist to identify strengths and
    challenges/needs.
  • Watch/Use Videos 5, 7, 6, and 8---only if
    helpfulall elementary examples.
  • NOTE Skills Checklist Appendix 1 of M2 P5

63
Team Time
  • Review Supervisory Skills Checklist Expect
    Section.
  • Discuss how to clarify common area expectations
    for your students. Ideas and/or concerns?
  • REPORT OUT.

64
5. Identify Procedures to Encourage Responsible
Behavior
  • Provide Positive feedback As important as
    corrective procedures
  • Develop menu of ideas for your Policy
  • Praise and attention in area or activity
  • Contingent
  • Non-contingent

65
Connecting with Students
  • Effective supervisors provide students with
    non-contingent attention
  • Verbal and non-verbal greetings
  • Addressing students by name
  • Showing an interest in students, without being
    too nosy or personal
  • Avoiding being overly friendly or hyping things
    up
  • Persisting even when students are unresponsive

66
Connecting
  • Effective supervisors provide positive feedback
    to students when meeting expectations.
  • Contingent Feedback
  • Using effective positive feedback
  • Quick and Specific
  • Contingent
  • Age-appropriate
  • Reasonably private
  • Watch Videos 9 (non-contingent) and 10
    (contingent)

67
Connecting
  • Effective supervisors strive for a 3-to-1 ratio
    of interactions with every student.
  • Three positive interactions (catching student
    being good or just being) with students for every
    one negative interaction (correction of
    misbehavior).
  • Not how we interact (we are always positive and
    professional) but when (not just when students
    misbehave).

68
Connecting
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1. Common area supervisors view and discuss all
    topics in M2, P4 and 5
  • 2. Common area supervisors use checklist to self
    assessidentifying strengths and challenges/areas
    needing improvement
  • NOTE Skills Checklist in Appendix 1 of M2 P5

69
Team Time
  • Review Supervisory Skills Checklist Connect
    Section.
  • Discuss.
  • REPORT OUT.

70
Effective Supervision---Part 2
  • Correcting Misbehavior
  • (M2 P5)

71
6. Identify Procedures to Correct Misbehavior in
Common Area
  • Develop menu for your Policy
  • Provide a range of options when possible
  • Be brief, calm, and very consistent
  • Respond as immediately as possible
  • THE KEY Pre-planned responses as part of your
    Policy

72
Introduction
  • Proactive strategies that increase responsible
    student behavior
  • Structuring common areas for student success
    (M2P2)
  • Teaching students to behave responsibly in common
    areas (M2P3)
  • Supervisors in common areas that use essential
    proactive supervision skills of protect, expect,
    and connect (M2P4)

73
Introduction
  • Even when proactive strategies are
    well-implemented, students will still misbehave
  • Focus of this presentationresponding effectively
    to student misbehavior
  • Correcting misbehavior consistently, calmly, and
    respectfully
  • Using productive corrections
  • Preventing and dealing thoughtfully with student
    non-compliance

74
Consistent Corrections
  • Effective supervisors are consistent
  • What it means
  • Ensuring that every observed misbehavior receives
    a response
  • Ensuring that responses to similar misbehaviors
    are the same
  • student to student, day to day, and supervisor to
    supervisor

75
Consistent
  • Why important?
  • No response expectation not important
  • Misbehavior potentially reinforcing to students
  • Inconsistency intermittent rewards
  • May result in fairness issues
  • Tip
  • DO SOMETHING!----some response better than no
    response
  • Watch video 2. (1 is an elementary example)

76
Calm Corrections
  • Respond unemotionally
  • Provides a good model
  • De-escalates
  • Decreases power
  • struggles
  • Emotion can reinforce

77
Calm
  • Tips
  • Remind yourself, I am the adult in this
    situation
  • Dont take it personally
  • Think before respond and Preplan responses
  • Consider misbehavior a teaching opportunity
  • Watch Videos 4 and 3

78
Respectful Corrections
  • Dignity and Respect
  • Tone, Body, Volume
  • Words, Private
  • Model for students
  • Positive climate
  • Compliance and Cooperation
  • Save face with peers

79
Respectful
  • Tips
  • Get attention--quietly say I need to speak to
    you.
  • When other students around, go to misbehaving
    student and tell that you need to speak
  • When correcting a student, position yourself in a
    non-confrontational way
  • That allows you to continue supervising other
    students
  • That keeps the misbehaving student from making
    eye contact with other students.
  • Watch Video 5 (elementary but on point!)

80
Corrections
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1. Common area supervisors view and discuss
    topics in M2, P4 and P5
  • 2. Common area supervisors use checklist to self
    assess strengths and needs
  • NOTE Supervisory Skills Checklist in M2P5
    Appendix 1

81
TEAM TIME
  • Review Supervisory Skills Checklist Correct
    Section.
  • Discuss Corrections in Your Common
    Area---component 6 of Policy
  • Are they Consistent, Calm, and Respectful?
  • Use Sample Policies to help (make own)
  • Report Out

82
The Top Ten Supervision Skills
  • As I describe them
  • Write an S next to the skill if you do it well
    (on Study Guide).
  • Write an I next to the skill if you feel it
    could use some improvement.

83
10--Be There
  • An effective supervisor will be there.
  • On Time
  • Ready to supervise, before students arrive.
  • May require resolving scheduling conflicts. If
    you rotate supervisors, remember to strive for
    consistency so adults know the students.

84
Be There
  • In the Right PlacePhysically
  • Go to your assigned location
  • In the Right PlaceMentally
  • Look alert and engageddont be grading papers,
    talking to another adult or simply staring into
    space!
  • Be interactive with the students.

85
9 Look Listen
  • An effective supervisor will be aware.
  • Using Visual Scanning
  • Continually sweep the whole area, especially
    your assigned area, but occasionally scan other
    supervisors areas.
  • Focus your sweep on known trouble spots.
  • Watch for unusual grouping or crowds of students.
  • Investigate sneaky/guilty looks.

86
9--Look Listen
  • Listening
  • Be sensitive to the sounds in your assigned
    area
  • things getting too quiet,
  • a surge of noise,
  • or a gradual low level increase in noise.

87
8--Be Mobile
  • Greet students as they enter or exit.
  • Spend more time in known trouble spots.
  • If possible, circulate unpredictably throughout
    assigned area.
  • Work the line when students are required to
    wait in a linehelps you connect with students!

88
7--Know What Is Expected
  • An effective supervisor needs to knows how the
    students are supposed to behave for the area
    he/she is supervising.
  • Know the rules for when entering, while in and
    when exiting the common area.
  • Convey the expectation that students will comply.

89
6--Be Proactive
  • Interact intentionally within the first 5 minutes
    with those students (targeted and intensive kids)
    who often have problems in that setting.
  • Connect by smiling, acknowledge appropriate
    behavior and talk about something of interest.

90
Be ProactiveConnectingDeliver Non-contingent
Attention!
  • What is it? It is communicating positively to a
    student without regard to what he/she is doing.
  • Benefits of noncontingent attention
  • Students feel more connected.
  • Adults provide a model of pleasant social
    interaction.
  • Student behavior will improve.
  • Tone and school climate is pleasant, friendly and
    invitational.

91
Be Proactive Connecting Positive Feedback
  • An effective supervisor provides positive
    feedback to students when they are behaving,
    especially when you start your new hallway
    policy.
  • Positive feedback is a powerful way to encourage
    students to demonstrate responsible
    behaviorstudents typically like the adult
    attention.
  • Appropriate positive feedback tells the student
    that he/she is on the right track and encourages
    the student to continue making responsible
    choices in the future.

92
6--Be ProactiveConnect Positive Feedback
  • Effective feedback has five
    characteristics
  • Quick and accuratedont over-talk
  • Specificdont just say good job
  • Contingentbased on behavior
  • Age-appropriate for the student
  • Reasonably private

93
5--Always Respond
  • An effective supervisor responds to all
    misbehavior, even the low-level misbehavior.
  • Better to respond with good intentions than to
    ignore misbehavior.
  • Research shows that it is not the severity of the
    consequence that will stop misbehavior--it is the
    certainty or CONSISTENCY of a consequence that
    will stop behavior (especially if using a mild
    consequence).

94
4--Respond Quickly
  • An effective supervisor is proactive and
    intervenes early.
  • Be proactive and interact positively with
    students (who are known to have difficulty)
    before they have problems. Get to them early!
  • Do not ignore misbehavior Need to do something!
  • If another supervisor is having problems, walk
    over and be available but let him/her deal with
    it.

95
3 Maximize Your Delivery
  • How best to give directions when correcting
  • Get students attention--use name
  • Get closer, but not too close
  • Avoid squaring off.
  • Avoid an audience.
  • Be aware of personal space
  • Avoid touching the student if he/she is upset
  • Dont take misbehavior personally

96
3 Maximize Your Delivery
  • ALSO
  • Use clear and simple language
  • State directions positively.
  • Do not frame them as a question.
  • Be brief.
  • Talk slowly and quietly
  • Give no more than 1 or 2 directions at a time.
  • Give student time to respond.
  • Avoid staring down the student.

97
2 Choose Corrections Wisely
  • Respond CONSISTENTLY
  • Strive to respond to similar misbehaviors in the
    same way
  • From student to student
  • Supervisor to supervisor
  • Day to day

98
1--Reach Out and Connect
  • Students need to be noticed and valued and when
    they feel noticed and valued, (i.e. connected),
    they are more likely to engage in appropriate
    behavior.
  • Smile, shake hands, wink, thumbs up, etc.
  • Learn and use their names!

99
Activity TOP 10 Review
  • Review and Discuss your Ss and Is with your team.
  • What are your strengths and challenges?
  • What do you think are your schools strengths and
    challenges?
  • Review the Top 10 Supervision Skills Document
    (Handout). How might you use as part of your
    Common Area Policy?
  • Report Out.

100
Productive Corrections
  • Effective supervisors use menu of corrections
    for misbehavior in variety of situations
  • -Gentle corrections---quick/one liner
  • A brief statement of the positive expectation
  • Useful when time is short, the problem is minor,
    and/or the supervisor is unsure what else to do
  • -Instructional corrections
  • An explanative statement (may be more lengthy
    than a one-liner)
  • Useful when a student needs more
    information/rationale about the expectation

101
Corrections
  • Humorous correction
  • A disarming response that avoids direct
    confrontation
  • Useful when humor is a natural part of the
    supervisors interactions with students
  • IMPORTANTAvoid humiliation, ridicule, sarcasm
  • Relationship correction
  • A brief response based on an established
    relationship between adult and student
  • Useful when a student is likely to behave for
    the supervisor

102
Corrections
  • Brief delay
  • Tell student to stay put and think for a moment
  • Useful when a student is en route
  • Positive practice
  • Student demonstrates the expected behavior
  • Go back and walk around the game
  • Useful when there is a physical component
  • Restitution
  • Student repairs damage that has been done
  • student picks up litter that he/she dropped
  • student apologizes to someone

103
Corrections
  • Change in location
  • Student moves to a different location or operates
    within a restricted space
  • student has to move to a different table in the
    cafeteria
  • student is restricted to a limited area of the
    playground
  • Useful when the current location may be a
    contributing factor in the misbehavior

104
Corrections
  • Referral for a more intense misbehavior
  • Writing a Level 2 (moderate) referral on the
    student
  • student has to go to detention
  • student has to go to the schools problem-solving
    room
  • Writing a Level 3 (severe) referral on the
    student
  • student has to go to the office
  • NOTE Foundations recommendations regarding
    levels of referrals and when to use them are
    discussed in M3P3 and P4

105
Corrections
  • Effective supervisors use corrections based on
    circumstances
  • As mild a correction as possible to stop the
    misbehavior from continuing
  • Increase severity of correction gradually as
    student misbehaves repeatedly
  • Remembering that what is done is less important
    than doing something consistently

106
Corrections
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1.Common area supervisors view and discuss all
    the topics in M2, P4 and P5
  • 2. Common area supervisors use a checklist to
    self assess
  • NOTE Supervisory Skills Checklist can be found
    in Appendix 1 of M2 P5

107
Preventing Student Noncompliance
  • Effective supervisors communicate assumption that
    students will comply with all expectations and
    directions
  • Use body language and tone of voice to
    demonstrate that he/she expects students to
    follow directions

108
Noncompliance
  • Effective supervisors careful when giving
    directions
  • Get students attention first
  • Go to the student-----no distance directions
  • More likely to be ignored or challenged
  • Avoid squaring off and audience
  • Use clear and simple language
  • State direction positively, be brief
  • State direction as statement (not a question)
  • Give 1 or 2, time to respond, no stare downs

109
Noncompliance
  • Effective supervisors respond thoughtfully when
    student initially fails to follow a direction
  • Will try
  • Humor/Appeal to Cooperation/Broken Record
    Technique
  • Offering the student a reasonable choice
  • Inform student of what will happen if direction
    not followed and if followed (not a threat)

110
Noncompliance
  • Initial noncompliance------
  • Supervisor avoids
  • Arguing
  • Escalating the intensity of the situation
  • Letting the student get away with it
  • Physically trying to make the student comply
  • Threatening the student with what will
    happen---OK to inform but do not threaten

111
Noncompliance
  • Effective supervisors respond thoughtfully if
    noncompliance continues
  • Inform student that there will be follow up on
    the matter
  • Record what has happened
  • Complete a referral form
  • Discuss the situation (and sharing any records)
    with immediate supervisor and/or Foundations Team
    representative

112
Noncompliance
  • ACTION STEPS/SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES
  • 1. Common area supervisors view and discuss all
    the topics M2, P4 and P5
  • 2. Common area supervisors use checklist to self
    assess strengths and areas of need
  • NOTE Supervisory Skills Checklist in Appendix 1
    of M2 P5

113
TEAM TIME
  • Discuss noncompliance issues and concerns in your
    Common Areas and Productive Corrections slides.
  • Discuss methods of Correcting Misbehavior
  • Review and Discuss (on-going) the Supervisors
    Self Assessment Checklist (Handout)
  • NOTE M2P5A1
  • Continue working on all 6 components of Policy.
  • REPORT OUT

114
Homework for Fall 2012
  • Guidelines For Success Plan Implemented.
  • Bring a copy of plan.
  • One Comprehensive Common Area Policy with all Six
    Components.
  • Bring one written Policy for one Common Area
  • Be prepared to report out on these two areas, and
  • Start on Time.
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