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Enrollment Management Division Update

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Title: Building a SEM Organization: The Internal Consultant Approach Author: sstites Last modified by: goffjw Created Date: 10/26/2007 4:20:00 PM – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Enrollment Management Division Update


1
Enrollment Management Division Update
EM Kick-Off August 7, 2008
2
  • New Mission Statement
  • Missouri University of Science and Technology
    integrates education and research to create and
    convey knowledge to solve problems for our State
    and the technological world.
  • (Mission Statement Approved January 2008 Board of
    Curators' Meeting)
  • Vision
  • The vision of the Missouri University of Science
    and Technology is to be a top-five technological
    research university by 2011.
  • Values
  • Tradition We are a diverse scholarly community
    of hard-working problem-solvers who draw
    inspiration, strength, and pride from our
    history, our students success, and our
    entrepreneurial spirit.
  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration We value the
    entire realm of human knowledge and seek to
    transcend conventional boundaries in the pursuit
    of our goals.
  • Inclusiveness We encourage and depend upon
    mutual recognition and respect and the voluntary
    cooperative efforts of our diverse constituents
    to sustain a strong and cohesive scholarly
    community.
  • Excellence We embrace academic integrity,
    exceptional results, and constant improvement in
    teaching, research, service, and economic
    development activities.

3
Enrollment Management Missionapproved June 2001
  • The Division of Enrollment Management coordinates
    student enrollment services for the University,
    working collaboratively with the academic units,
    student affairs and administrative units to
    identify and implement processes to meet, and
    strive to exceed student/customer expectations
    and University goals.
  • Research
  • Recruitment
  • Retention

4
Enrollment Management Division2008-09
  • Registrar
  • Student Financial Assistance
  • Admissions and Visitor Center
  • New Student Programs (Orientation IDs)
  • Student Diversity Programs
  • Womens Leadership Institute
  • Center for Pre-College Programs
  • Project Lead the Way

5
New Organizational Chart and Titleseffective
September 1, 2008
6
Enrollment Development TeamEDT Key Points of
Student Contact
  • Admissions
  • Registrar
  • Financial Aid
  • Campus Housing
  • Student Activities
  • Counseling Center
  • Orientation
  • Teacher Training Director (RPDC)
  • Info Tech
  • Institutional Research
  • Womens Programs (WLI)
  • Minority Programs (SDP)
  • International Affairs
  • Cashier/Billing
  • Pre-College Programs
  • Reporting Services

7
Core Enrollment Management Performance
Expectations
  • Managerial Philosophy
  • Follow the Platinum Rule Do unto others as you
    would prefer them to do unto you
  • 2. Student Service Philosophy
  • Find ways to say YES
  • 3. Operational Philosophy
  • Make data based decisions do the basics better
    than everyone else

8
The Core Understandings of Missouri ST
Enrollment Management
  1. We exist to help and serve students the best we
    can
  2. Be honest and positive at all times. Never feel
    pressure to make things up or answer questions
    you do not know the answers to. Feel free to
    say, I dont know,but I will find out and get
    back to you.
  3. You are the University everything you say, how
    you look and act will be the guests vision and
    image of Missouri ST. Take your role and the
    responsibility that goes with it very seriously.

9
Strategic Enrollment Management Plan 2007-2011
  • Increase Success of Students
  • Retention Rates
  • Graduation Rates
  • Increase College Going Rate Access
  • Access Affordability
  • Pipeline of College Ready Students
  • Strategic Partnerships
  • Outreach/Education
  • Scholarships
  • Expanding Current Markets Capturing New Markets
  • Out-of-state students
  • Transfer Students
  • Female Students
  • Underrepresented Minority Students
  • International Students
  • Graduate Students
  • Nontraditional Students

10
Strategic Plan Update
11
  • The ideal Missouri ST freshmen class would have
    990 to 1030 students with the following profile
  • Academic Preparedness
  • 27 average ACT score (upper 10 in nation)
  • 90 having completed the full Missouri
    college-prep curriculum
  • 50 from the upper 20 of high school class
  • Geography
  •             70 in-state
  •             25 out-of-state    
  •             5 international
  • Gender
  •             30 female
  •             70 male
  • Ethnicity
  •             13 under-represented minority
    students
  • Majors
  • 70 Engineering (all programs) 
  • 5 Liberal Arts (psychology, history, English,
    technical communication, philosophy)
  • 8 Business, Information Technology and Economics

12
Enrollment Concerns 2000-2001
  • 52 Graduation Rate
  • 82 Retention Rate
  • 23 Female Enrollment
  • 8 Minority Student Enrollment
  • 8 Year Decline New Students (-700 students)
  • Industry Asking for MORE Graduates

13
Enrollment Status 2006-2007
  • 64 Graduation Rate
  • 87 Retention Rate
  • 23 Female Enrollment (341)
  • 10 Minority Student Enrollment (264)
  • Record New Student Classes Student Success
  • 6 Year Increase (1,541 students)
  • Industry STILL Asking for MORE Graduates

14
2011 Enrollment Student Success Goals
  • 950-1000 FTC Freshmen
  • 300-350 Transfers
  • Upper 10 Academic Ability
  • 90 Retention Rate
  • 65 Graduation Rate

15
U.S. Technological Research Universities
WPI
RPI
Michigan Tech
Clarkson Univ
MIT
SD School of Mines
PolytechnicUniversity
Illinois Inst. of Tech
New JerseyInstitute of Tech
Colorado School of Mines
Missouri ST
CalTech
New Mexico Inst Mining Tech
Stevens Institute of Technology
GeorgiaTech
Florida Institute of Technology
16
Technological Research Universities
  • Quality indicators
  • ACT 75th percentile
  • First-year students from top 10 of HS Class
  • First-to-second year retention rate
  • Six-year graduation rate
  • National merit scholars
  • National academy members
  • Total research expenditures per faculty
  • Ph.Ds awarded per faculty
  • Ratio of doctoral degrees to graduate degrees
  • Student faculty ratio

17
Combined Rankings
Combined Rank Mean
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1.2 1
  • California Institute of Technology 2.3 2
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 3.8 3
  • Georgia Institute of Technology 4.3 4
  • Missouri University of Science and
    Technology 7.2 5
  • Stevens Institute of Technology 8.2 6
  • Colorado School of Mines 8.5 7
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute 8.8 8
  • Illinois Institute of Technology 9.6 9
  • Clarkson University 10.0 10
  • New Mexico Inst of Mining Technology 10.0 11
  • Polytechnic University 10.5 12
  • Michigan Technological University 10.6 13
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology 11.0 14
  • Florida Institute of Technology 11.5 15
  • South Dakota School of Mines Technology 12.2 16

18
Enrollment KPIsKey Performance Indicators
19
Missouri ST ENROLLMENT33 Growth since
2000Since 2004, 60 of Growth due to Retention
Increase
20
STUDENT RETENTION
Graduation Rates 2000 2005 General
Student Body 52 64
21
Record Setting Years for Student Diversity
Enrollment Performance Fall 2000 - 2007 Enrollment Performance Fall 2000 - 2007 Enrollment Performance Fall 2000 - 2007 Enrollment Performance Fall 2000 - 2007 Enrollment Performance Fall 2000 - 2007 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2000 -2007 change
Undergraduate Undergraduate Undergraduate Undergraduate Undergraduate 3698 3756 3849 4089 4120 4313 4515 4753 29
Graduate 928 1127 1391 1370 1287 1289 1343 1414 52
TOTAL 4626 4883 5240 5459 5407 5602 5858 6167 33
Enrollment By Ethnic Group Enrollment By Ethnic Group Enrollment By Ethnic Group
American Indian/Alaskan Native American Indian/Alaskan Native American Indian/Alaskan Native 24 26 23 27 23 21 20 33 38
Asian-American Asian-American 127 128 137 151 142 158 198 198 56
Black, Non-Hispanic Black, Non-Hispanic 168 197 213 230 218 237 245 271 61
Hispanic-American Hispanic-American 58 63 83 100 100 126 137 139 140
Non-Resident, International Non-Resident, International Non-Resident, International 590 723 819 749 600 565 585 619 5
Ethnicity Not Specified Ethnicity Not Specified 171 179 209 253 298 253 250 242 42
White, Non-Hispanic White, Non-Hispanic 3,488 3,567 3,756 3,949 4,026 4,242 4,423 4,665 34
Total 4,626 4,883 5,240 5,459 5,407 5,602 5,858 6,167 33
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2000 -2007 change
Total Minorities, Non-Caucasian US Citizens Total Minorities, Non-Caucasian US Citizens Total Minorities, Non-Caucasian US Citizens Total Minorities, Non-Caucasian US Citizens Total Minorities, Non-Caucasian US Citizens 377 414 456 508 483 542 600 641 70
of Total 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10
Under-Represented Minority US Citizens Under-Represented Minority US Citizens Under-Represented Minority US Citizens Under-Represented Minority US Citizens Under-Represented Minority US Citizens 250 286 319 357 341 384 402 443 77
of Total 5 6 6 7 6 7 7 7
Non-Resident, International Non-Resident, International Non-Resident, International Non-Resident, International 590 723 819 749 600 565 585 619 5
of Total 13 15 16 14 11 10 10 10
Enrollment By Gender Enrollment By Gender
Female 1,050 1,097 1,133 1,248 1,209 1,224 1,326 1391 32
23 23 22 23 22 22 23 23
Male 3576 3786 4107 4211 4198 4378 4532 4776 34
77 77 78 77 78 78 77 77
BOLD Missouri ST Record High BOLD Missouri ST Record High BOLD Missouri ST Record High BOLD Missouri ST Record High
2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students 2007 International Student Representation 2.6 of undergraduates, 2.5 of distance grad students, 53.3 of campus grad students
22
National Student Success Trends
ACT, 2007
23
Academic Quality
Ave. Freshmen ACT Score Missouri ST Goal
Upper 10 in Nation
24
University of Missouri - Rolla
Geographic Origin of All
Students - Fall 2007
WASHINGTON
62
MAINE
NORTH DAKOTA
MINNESOTA
MONTANA
  • ALASKA

4
1
OREGON
VT
18
3
2
WISCONSIN
NH
5
13
IDAHO
12
SOUTH DAKOTA
MA
3
15
NEW YORK
5
CT
MICHIGAN
WYOMING
2
16
5
2
PENNSYLVANIA
IOWA
12
NEVADA
26
NEBRASKA
NJ
OHIO
43
IN
5
UTAH
ILLINOIS

18
15
10
395
WV
4
COLORADO
VIRGINIA
16
4
DC 2
KANSAS
20
12
MISSOURI
137
KENTUCKY
CALIFORNIA
4,321
17
NO. CAROLINA
59
TENNESSEE
5
59
ARIZONA
OKLAHOMA
ARKANSAS
NEW MEXICO
12
61
5
3
MS
GEORGIA
ALABAMA
8
11
12
LA
TEXAS
13
110
3
12
FL
All Students, Totals United States
5,605 Other
Countries 564 Total
6,167
HAWAII 1
Armed Forces Pacific Africa 3
PUERTO RICO 1
Note Geographic Origin is defined as student's
legal residence at time of original admission to
Missouri ST. Source Integrated Postsecondary
Education Data System (IPEDS) frozen files, end
of 4th week of classes. Revised 9-24-2007.
25
University of Missouri - Rolla
Geographic Origin of Total Enrolled Students by
County - Fall 2007
SCOTLAND
PUTNAM
WORTH
MERCER
2
1
CLARK
4
0
ATCHISON
0
5
HARRISON
NODAWAY
0
GENTRY
2
SULLIVAN
10
Total Enrollment from Missouri Missouri
4,321 Other Locations
1,846 Total 6,167
2
GRUNDY
KNOX
5
11
LEWIS
HOLT
0
6
4
1
DAVIESS
ANDREW
MACON
  • ADAIR

DE KALB
LINN
6
4
MARION
SHELBY
1
13
3
27
5
CALDWELL
27
6
CALDWELL
CLINTON
2
RALLS
BUCHANAN
2
CHARITON
11
8
MONROE
CARROLL
RANDOLPH
0
PIKE
4
RAY
13
PLATTE
1
CLAY
8
57
AUDRAIN
11
90
15
HOWARD
SALINE
BOONE
LINCOLN
8
LAFAYETTE
4
11
55
JACKSON
73
283
COOPER
CALLAWAY
17
WARREN
4
1019
22
86
33
JOHNSON
PETTIS
398
27
MONITEAU
CASS
16
49
7
COLE
OSAGE
FRANKLIN
90
8
MORGAN
20
HENRY
130
5
BENTON
12
181
BATES
MARIES
MILLER
7
20
25
3
CAMDEN
CRAWFORD
ST. CLAIR
48
25
HICKORY
PHELPS
37
4
12
PULASKI
1
18
PERRY
VERNON
353
150
9
CEDAR
IRON
8
DALLAS
LACLEDE
DENT
7
POLK
10
32
MADISON
8
40
13
6
8
BARTON
REYNOLDS
DADE
58
10
TEXAS
5
WEBSTER
WRIGHT
3
GREENE
20
13
5
138
JASPER
SHANNON
WAYNE
SCOTT
41
LAWRENCE
4
13
11
CARTER
12
CHRISTIAN
DOUGLAS
STODDARD
8
8
52
NEWTON
9
3
BUTLER
16
HOWELL
RIPLEY
OREGON
OZARK
STONE
22
BARRY
18
10
4
MCDONALD
TANEY
1
9
12
8
4
16
Note Geographic Origin is defined as
student's legal residence at time of original
admission to Missouri ST. Source Integrated
Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS)
frozen files, 4th week after enrollment.
11
5
DUNKLIN
26
(No Transcript)
27
(No Transcript)
28
(No Transcript)
29
Classroom Utilization
30
(No Transcript)
31
Starting Salaries
  • Undergraduate Graduate
  • 2003 47,305 52,744
  • 2004 46,567 52,945
  • 2005 49,181 53,042
  • 2006 51,059 58,120
  • 2007 53,669 62,751
  • 2008 55,975 63,640

32
New Ranking by Starting Salary!
  • Missouri ST
  • 25 among all universities in the nation
  • 1 among Midwestern universities
  • SOURCE Payscale Inc, Wall Street Journal, July
    30, 2008.

33
Student Demographics
  • On-Campus Distance
  • ALL STUDENTS UNDERGRAD GRADUATE GRADUATE
  • Average Age 21.0 20 27 34
  • Gender
  • Female 23 22 26 21
  • Male 77 78 74 79
  • First Generation
  • College Students
  • 2004-07 N/A 36 N/A N/A
  • Residency
  • Missouri 73.5 81.2 33.5 39.4
  • Out-of-State 15.8 16.3 13.2 58.1
  • International 10.7 2.6 53.3 2.5
  • Ethnicity
  • African-American 4.1 4.5 1.9 8.0

34
(No Transcript)
35
Overall Enrollment by Residency Missouri
Residents 76 Out-of-State Students 24
36
Environmental and Market Trend Scans
37
The Golden Circle for Recruitment 70 enroll
within 140 miles of home 80 enroll in home state
38
FS2007 First Time College Domestic Enrollment
Yield
   
   


39
FS2007 First Time College Enrollment Yield For
Missouri
40
Domestic Overall Freshmen Enrollment Yield Funnel
FS2007
  • Inquiries 9629
  • Applicants 2305
  • Admits 2154
  • Enrollees 1040
  • 48 Admits Enrolled
  • 11 Inquiries Enrolled

41
Domestic Male Freshmen Enrollment Yield Funnel
FS2007
  • Inquiries 5479
  • Applicants 1780
  • Admits 1663
  • Enrollees 827
  • 50 Admits Enrolled
  • 15 Inquiries Enrolled

42
Domestic Female Freshmen Enrollment Yield Funnel
FS2007
  • Inquiries 2912
  • Applicants 524
  • Admits 490
  • Enrollees 214
  • 44 Admits Enrolled
  • 7 Inquiries Enrolled

43
Domestic Traditionally Under-represented Freshmen
Enrollment Yield Funnel FS2007
  • Inquiries 1438
  • Applicants 291
  • Admits 223
  • Enrollees 94
  • 42 Admits Enrolled
  • 6.5 Inquiries Enrolled

44
Domestic African-American Freshmen Enrollment
Yield Funnel FS2007
  • Inquiries 840
  • Applicants 151
  • Admits 92
  • Enrollees 38
  • 41 Admits Enrolled
  • 4.5 Inquiries Enrolled

45
Domestic Freshmen from Missouri Enrollment Yield
Funnel FS2007
  • Inquiries 6247
  • Applicants 1641
  • Admits 1511
  • Enrollees 822
  • 54 Admits Enrolled
  • 13 Inquiries Enrolled

46
Domestic Freshmen Out of State Enrollment Yield
Funnel FS2007
  • Inquiries 3382
  • Applicants 664
  • Admits 643
  • Enrollees 229
  • 36 Admits Enrolled
  • 7 Inquiries Enrolled

47
International Freshmen Enrollment Yield Funnel
FS2007
  • Inquiries 52
  • Applicants 68
  • Admits 39
  • Enrollees 11
  • 28 Admits Enrolled

48
Todays Teens and Social Media
  • The use of social media gains a greater foothold
    in teen life as they embrace the conversational
    nature of interactive online media
  • Some 93 of teens use the internet, and more of
    them than ever are treating it as a venue for
    social interaction a place where they can share
    creations, tell stories, and interact with
    others.
  • SOURCE PEW 12/19/2007

49
2007 Pew Internet Survey
  • Less that 35 of Rural Internet Users have Access
    to High Speed Internet

50
Domestic Freshmen Online Application Enrollment
Yield Funnel FS2007
  • Applicants 1276
  • Admits 1213
  • Enrollees 550
  • 45 Admits Enrolled

51
Domestic Freshmen Paper Application Enrollment
Yield Funnel FS2007
  • Applicants 1029
  • Admits 941
  • Enrollees 490
  • 52 Admits Enrolled

52
Student Market Update
53
Factors Most Noted in Choosing a College
  • Majors Career Programs Offered
  • Location/Campus Characteristics
  • Cost/Affordability
  • Campus Size/Safety
  • Characteristics of Enrolled Students
  • Selectivity

54
Pricing
Institutional Research
Strategic Planning
Admission Recruitment
Academic Policies
Housing
Alumni and Development
Teachin Learning
Mental Health Services
Campus Life
Social Support Programs
Assessment of Student Learning
Student Success
Academic Support Programs
Career Planning
Institutional Policies
External Engagement
Marketing
Institutional Effectiveness
Recors and Registration
Financial Aid
Budgeting
Academic Programs
SOURCE Bob Wilkinson
55
Core Market Challenges Changes in the
college-bound student markets
  • The Midwest will experience a 4 to 10 decline
    in high school graduates between 2007 2012
    (Source WICHE, 2003 Knocking at the College
    Door)
  • The profile of college-bound students is rapidly
    becoming more ethnically diverse and female
    dominant (Source NCES, 2005 WICHE, 2003)
  • The number of students interested in engineering,
    computer science, and natural science degrees has
    declined to record lows (Source ACT, 2003
    Maintaining a Strong Engineering Workforce Policy
    Report National Academies, Rising Above the
    Gathering Storm, 2006)
  • More full-time college freshmen are choosing to
    start at two-year colleges (Source US Department
    of Education IPEDS. 2005 Source Missouri
    Department of Higher Education, 2005)
  • More students are enrolling in more than one
    college at a time (Source National Student
    Clearinghouse, 2005 Noel Levitz, 2004 College
    Board, 2006)
  • Future student market growth will include more
    students requiring financial aid and loans to
    complete a degree (Source WICHE, 2003)

56
WHY A NEW NAME for University of Missouri-Rolla?
effective Jan. 1, 2008
  • WWW.MST.EDU

57
Undergraduate Demographics
  • Average Age 21.6 years old
  • Gender
  • 23 Female
  • 77 Male
  • First Generation College Students
  • 2005-06 37
  • Residency
  • Missouri Residents 76
  • Out-State Students 22
  • International 2
  • Ethnicity
  • African-American 4
  • Asian-American 3
  • Caucasian 83
  • Hispanic 2
  • From a Community lt40,000 55 approx.
  • Average Family Income 72,000
  • Average Indebtedness at Graduation
  • 21,000 USD approx.
  • High Financial Need (Pell qualifier) 24
  • Freshmen with Credit Cards
  • 24
  • 6 arrive with over 1000 USD standing balance
  • Students with PCs
  • 94
  • 70 laptops
  • 7 Macs
  • Students with Cell Phones

58
Student Interest Trends in Engineering
(lt5)
SOURCE ACT, 2006
59
Name Recognition Among College-Bound Students
Outside of Missouri
  • All ACT Out-of-State
  • Senders State Senders
  • 4942 391 Central Missouri State
    University
  • 2629 551 Missouri ST
  • 4241 651 Southeast Missouri State
    University
  • 3352 654 UMSL
  • 4164 728 Truman State
  • 4278 981 UMKC
  • 9221 1000 Missouri State University
  • 3926 1187 Northwest Missouri State
    University
  • 12800 2301 UMC
  • 5382 2591 St. Louis University
  • 7343 5331 Washington University in St.
    Louis

60
A National Environmental Scan
61
Shifting Student Populations
  • The demographic shifts we are beginning to
    experience are largely the result of welcome
    advances in technology and public health that
    have extended life expectancy, improved living
    standards, and reduced population growth.
  • SOURCE Jane Sneddon Little and Robert K. Triest.
    (2001) SEISMIC SHIFTS THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF
    DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE.

62
Future Students Demographic and Population
Changes
  • Fewer first-time, traditional students in the
    overall pipeline until between 2015-2017while
    older population is growing
  • More students of color
  • More students of lower socioeconomic status
  • More students unprepared college level work

WICHE, 2003 2008
63
RESOURCES
  • http//opendoors.iienetwork.org/
  • www.act.org
  • www.ama.com
  • www.collegeboard.org
  • www.collegeresults.org
  • www.educationalpolicy.org (retention calculator)
  • www.nces.gov (2007 Digest of Education
    Statistics)
  • www.higheredinfo.org
  • www.noellevitz.com
  • www.stamats.com
  • www.wiche.org
  • www.educationtrust.org
  • www.lumina.org
  • www.greentreegazette.com
  • www.pewinternet.org
  • www.postsecondary.org
  • www.communicationbriefings.com
  • Recruitment and Retention in Higher Education

64
Over 4200 Colleges UniversitiesHeavy
Competition for StudentsNumber of Colleges and
Universities
  • SOURCE U.S. Education Department
  • http//chronicle.com Section The 2007-8
    Almanac, Volume 54, Issue 1, Page 8

65
Undergraduate Enrollment by Attendance Status
1986-2016
College Board, 2007
Source U.S. Department of Education
66
Labor Demand vs. Student Interests
  • Source U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of
    Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov/emp/home.htm

67
Ongoing interest declines in key fields Changes
in Intended Major 1976-77 to 2006-07
DATA SOURCE CIRP
CHART SOURCE College Board, 2007
68
Some Trends that have not Changed The Golden
Circle for Recruitment 70 enroll within 140
miles of home 80 enroll in home state
69
In-state vs. out-of-state freshmen recruitment
funnel ratios
SOURCE Noel Levitz 2006 Admissions Funnel Report
70
SOURCE College Board, 2007
71
Constant Growth in One Demographic Market
Adults Over 60
SOURCE US Census Bureau
72
NATIONAL Shift Impacts on Higher Education
  • Nationally, in 2009-10 the number of high school
    graduates will begin a gradual decline.
  • The proportion of minority students is increasing
    and will account for about half of school
    enrollments within the next decade.
  • High school graduates in the future will include
    higher percentages from families with low
    incomes.
  • Knocking at the College Door Projections of High
    School Graduates by State, Income, and
    Race/Ethnicity, WICHE 2008.

73
WICHE, 2008
74
WICHE, 2008
75
College Board, 2007
76
National vs. Regional Trends
WICHE, 2008
77
HOMESCHOOLED STUDENTS Number and distribution of school-age children who were homeschooled, by amount of time spent in schools 1999 and 2003
                                                                                                                              
NOTE Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. Homeschooled children are those ages 517 educated by their parents full or part time who are in a grade equivalent to kindergarten through 12th grade. Excludes students who were enrolled in public or private school more than 25 hours per week and students who were homeschooled only because of temporary illness.
SOURCE Princiotta, D., Bielick, S., Van Brunt, A., and Chapman, C. (2005). Homeschooling in the United States 2003 (NCES 2005101), table 1. Data from U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Parent Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES), 1999 and Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey of the NHES, 2003.
78
WICHE, 2008
79
WICHE, 2008
80
SOURCE US Dept. of Education 2005
81
WICHE, 2008
82
55.7 US College-Going Rates of High School
Graduates - Directly from HS
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
83
College Board, 2007
84
College Board, 2007
85
International Student Data
  • OPEN DOORS

86
Demographics of Sri Lanka
87
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88
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89
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90
SOURCE ACT EIS
91
College Board, 2007
92

PARTICIPATION IN REMEDIAL EDUCATION Percentage of entering freshmen at degree-granting institutions who enrolled in remedial courses, by type of institution and subject area Fall 2000
                                                                                                                              
NOTE Data reported for fall 2000 are based on Title IV degree-granting institutions that enrolled freshmen in 2000. The categories used for analyzing these data include public 2-year, private 2-year, public 4-year, and private 4-year institutions. Data from private not-for-profit and for-profit institutions are reported together because there are too few private for-profit institutions in the sample to report them separately. The estimates in this indicator differ from those in indicator 18 because the populations differ. This indicator deals with entering freshmen of all ages in 2000 while indicator 18 examines a cohort (1992 12th-graders who enrolled in postsecondary education).
SOURCE Parsad, B., and Lewis, L. (2003). Remedial Education at Degree-Granting Postsecondary Institutions in Fall 2000 (NCES 2004010), table 4. Data from U.S. Department of Education, NCES, Postsecondary Education Quick Information System (PEQIS), Survey on Remedial Education in Higher Education Institutions, fall 2000.
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Mixed Results in the US
94
SOURCE http//www.postsecondary.org/archives/Post
ers/192Chart1.pdf
95
Financial considerations the most common reason
for leaving college
SOURCE ELS2002 A First Look at the Initial
Postsecondary Experiences of the High School
Sophomore Class of 2002 (National Center for
Education Statistics)
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COLLEGE COST COMPARISON
SOURCE The College Board 2006, MAP TIME,
November 6, 2006
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MOBILITY OF COLLEGE STUDENTS Percentage of freshmen who had graduated from high school in the previous 12 months attending a public or private not-for-profit 4-year college in their home state Fall 2006
                                                                                                                                                                  
NOTE Includes first-time postsecondary students who were enrolled at public and private not-for-profit 4-year degree-granting institutions that participated in Title IV federal financial aid programs. See supplemental note 9 for more information. Foreign students studying in the United States are included as out-of-state students. See supplemental note 1 for a list of states in each region.
SOURCE U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Fall 2006 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), Spring 2007.
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College Costs and Disposable Per Capita Income,
1996-97 to 2006-07
SourceThe College Board
99
Percent For Whom Financing was a Major Concern
1992-93 to 2006-07 (Selected Years)
College Board, 2007
Source CIRP
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Projected State and Local Budget Surplus (Gap) as
a Percent of Revenues, 2013
Source NCHEMS Don Boyd (Rockefeller Institute
of Government), 2005
102
By 2015
  • All States will have a structural budget deficit
  • Higher Education will likely lose funding to
    health care, transportation, prisons and K-12
    education.
  • Tuition revenue will become the majority source
    of operational income

103
SOURCE ACT EIS
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Female Enrollments Exceed 57 of All College
Students
SOURCE NCES, The Condition of Education 2006,
pg. 36
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Psychographic FACTOIDLandline telephones are
still a lifeline for teen social life
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Girls continue to lead the charge as the teen
blogosphere grows
  • 28 of online teens have created a blog, up from
    19 in 2004.
  • Overall, girls dominate the teen blogosphere 35
    of all online teen girls blog, compared with 20
    of online teen boys.
  • This gender gap for blogging has grown larger
    over time. Virtually all of the growth in teen
    blogging between 2004 and 2006 is due to the
    increased activity of girls.
  • Older teen girls are still far more likely to
    blog when compared with older boys (38 vs. 18),
    but younger girl bloggers have grown at such a
    fast clip that they are now outpacing even the
    older boys (32 of girls ages 12-14 blog vs. 18
    of boys ages 15-17).
  • SOURCE PEW 12/19/2007

107
Top Twenty Graduate Degrees Searched for on
gradschools.com since 2004
  • 11. Physician Assistant
  • 12. Sports Administration
  • 13. MBA
  • 14. Fine Arts
  • 15. International Relations
  • 16. Art Therapy
  • 17. Counseling Mental Health Therapy
  • 18. Public Health
  • 19. Educational School Counseling
  • 20. School Psychology
  1. History
  2. Physical Therapy
  3. Journalism Communications
  4. Social Work
  5. Fashion Textile Design
  6. Clinical Psychology
  7. Law
  8. Architecture
  9. Biology
  10. Creative Writing

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HIGHEST ADVANCED DEGREE ATTAINED Percentage of 199293 bachelors degree recipients who had earned an advanced degree by 2003, by bachelors degree field of study and highest degree attained
                                                                                                                              
Rounds to zero.
NOTE Masters degrees include students who earned a post-masters certificate. First-professional programs include Chiropractic (D.C. or D.C.M.), Pharmacy (Depart), Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.), Podiatry (Pod.D. or D.P.), Medicine (M.D.), Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Optometry (O.D.), Law (L.L.B. or J.D.), Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.), or Theology (M.Div., M.H.L., or B.D.). Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.
SOURCE U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 1993/03 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (BB93/03), previously unpublished tabulation (September 2005).
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Trends Summary
  • Decreasing numbers of high school graduates in
    the Midwest and Northeast
  • Declining percentage of high school graduates
    pursuing higher education directly out of high
    school
  • Increasing numbers of freshmen choosing to start
    at community colleges
  • Increasing diversity and financial need of future
    high school graduates
  • Increasing dependence on student loans and a
    larger percentage of household income needed to
    pay for college
  • Continued growth in the college student gender
    gap
  • Ongoing interest declines for non-biology STEM
    majors

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Strategic Enrollment Management Plan 2007-2011
  • Increase Success of Students
  • Retention Rates
  • Graduation Rates
  • Increase College Going Rate Access
  • Access Affordability
  • Pipeline of College Ready Students
  • Strategic Partnerships
  • Outreach/Education
  • Scholarships
  • Expanding Current Markets Capturing New Markets
  • Out-of-state students
  • Transfer Students
  • Female Students
  • Underrepresented Minority Students
  • International Students
  • Graduate Students
  • Nontraditional Students

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THANK YOU!!
  • For another great year
  • For another great class
  • For helping more students succeed
  • For making ST a great place to work!
  • Lets have a great 2008-09!!!
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