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Chapter 30 An Era of Protest and Change

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Chapter 30 An Era of Protest and Change How did the counterculture and the expanding rights revolution of the 1960s and 1970s influence American society? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 30 An Era of Protest and Change


1
Chapter 30 An Era of Protest and Change
  • How did the counterculture and the expanding
    rights revolution of the 1960s and 1970s
    influence American society?

2
Standards
  • SSUSH24
  • The student will analyze the impact of social
    change movements and organizations of the 1960's.
  • Element SSUSH24.a
  • Compare and contrast the Student Non-Violent
    Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Southern
    Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) tactics,
    including sit-ins, freedom rides, and changing
    composition.
  • Element SSUSH24.b
  • Describe the National Organization of Women and
    the origins and goals of the modern women's
    movement.
  • Element SSUSH24.c
  • Analyze the anti-Vietnam War movement.
  • Element SSUSH24.d
  • Analyze Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers
    movement.
  • Element SSUSH24.e
  • Explain Rachel Carson and Silent Spring, Earth
    Day, the creation of the EPA, and the modern
    environmentalist movement.

3
The Counterculture Section 1
  • What was the counterculture and what impact did
    it have on American society?
  • Vocabulary
  • -counterculture commune
  • -generation gap Haight-Ashbury
  • -Beatles Timothy Leary

4
Sec 1 The Counterculture
The Counterculture
The Counterculture Rises   Main Idea In the
1960s, a counterculture of hippies developed. The
hippies valued youth, spontaneity, freedom of
expression, and experimentation with styles very
different from those of the previous generation.
Defining the Counterculture Main Idea The
counterculture was shaped by rock-and-roll music,
the sexual revolution, experimenting with drugs,
unconventional clothing, and new religious and
political beliefs. The Counterculture
Ends Main Idea Most hippies became
disillusioned with the counterculture and began
to merge back into mainstream culture by the end
of the 1960s.
5
The Counterculture
  • Valued youth, spontaneity, and freedom of
    expression
  • Dont trust anyone over 30
  • Experimented with
  • new styles of dress
  • and music, free sex,
  • and drugs

6
Youth Culture
  • Culture that promoted freedom and individuality
    communes
  • New Attitudes about relationships, drugs, and
    music
  • Sexual revolution
  • New attitudes toward religion
  • Deaths of Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, and Jimi
    Hendrix
  • Beatles

7
Woodstock
8
Jimi Hendrix
9
Janis Joplin
10
Jim Morrison
11
Note Taking Reading Skill Identify Main Ideas
Reading Skill Identify Main Ideas
NOTE TAKING
12
Transparency Changing Fashions
Changing Fashions
TRANSPARENCY
13
Infographic The Generation Gap
The Generation Gap
INFOGRAPHIC
14
Progress Monitoring Transparency Section 1
PM TRANSPARENCY
Progress Monitoring Transparency
15
The Womens Rights Movement Section 2
  • What led to the rise of the womens movement and
    what impact did it have on American society?
  • Vocabulary
  • -feminism Gloria Steinem
  • -Betty Friedan Phyllis Schlafly
  • -NOW Roe v. Wade
  • -Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)

16
Sec 2 The Womens Rights Movement
The Womens Rights Movement
A Womens Movement Arises Main Idea There was a
rebirth of the womens movement as women strove
to redefine how they were viewed by society and
to gain more career opportunities. Women Find
Their Voices Main Idea The National
Organization for Women was established to fight
discrimination and lobby for reforms. Lasting
Effects of the Womens Movement Main Idea
Feminists began to make legal advances, including
legislation that legalized abortion and prevented
discrimination in the workplace.
17
Background of the Womens Movement
  • World War II more women worked
  • 1950s - many women stayed home
  • By 1970, 41 of college students were women
  • Women earned less and were not promoted to upper
    management

18
Impact of the Civil Rights Movement
  • Civil rights provided a model for techniques
  • Civil Rights Act of 1964 gave women right to
    sue for job discrimination
  • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was slow
    to push womens claims

19
Note Taking Reading Skill Identify Causes and
Effects
Reading Skill Identify Causes and Effects
NOTE TAKING
20
Womens Groups
  • Betty Friedan The Feminine Mystique
  • Felt women could not achieve their full potential
  • Took part in establishing NOW National
    Organization for Women

21
Impact of Feminism
  • Literary Impact Ms. Magazine Gloria Steinem
  • Shift in attitudes some women did not
    participate
  • Roe v. Wade constitutional right to personal
    privacy
  • Equal Rights Amendment make discrimination on
    account of sex illegal

22
Opposition to the Womens Movement
  • Phyllis Schlafly led campaign to block
    ratification of the ERA
  • Many men were hostile
  • Some women hostile

23
Transparency The Equal Rights Amendment
The Equal Rights Amendment
TRANSPARENCY
24
Comparing Viewpoints Do Women Need to Fight for
Equal Rights?
COMPARING VIEWPOINTS
Do Women Need to Fight for Equal Rights?
25
Chart Women in the Workforce by Age
Women in the Workforce, by Age
CHART
26
Progress Monitoring Transparency Section 2
PM TRANSPARENCY
Progress Monitoring Transparency
27
The Rights Revolution Expands Section 3
  • How did the rights movements of the 1960s and
    1970s expand rights for diverse groups of
    Americans?
  • Vocabulary
  • -Cesar Chavez Chicano movement
  • -migrant farmworker Ralph Nader
  • -United Farm Workers (UFW)
  • -American Indian Movement (AIM)

28
Sec 3 The Rights Revolution Expands
The Rights Revolution Expands
The Latino Population Grows   Main Idea The
need for laborers led to changing immigration
laws and a sharp increase in the number of
Mexicans and other Latinos entering the United
States. Pressing for Equal Rights Main Idea
In the 1960s, Latinos pressed for an end to
discrimination in the workplace, schools,
housing, and voting rights. Native Americans
and Asian Americans Battle Discrimination Main
Idea Native Americans were inspired by the
growing civil rights movement to expand their own
push for new rights during the 1960s. At this
same time, Asian Americans battled against a long
history of discrimination. New Rights for
Consumers and the Disabled Main Idea Building
on ideas first raised during the Progressive Era,
new laws were passed protecting consumers and
mandating workplace safety regulations. During
this time, the government also began exploring
ways to help people with disabilities.
29
Ethnic Minorities Seek Equality
  • Latino or Hispanic Population family origins
    are in Spanish-speaking Latin America
  • Chicanos Mexican Americans
  • Problems with education

30
Cesar Chavez
  • Helped migrant farm workers
  • Organized Mexican workers into the United Farm
    Workers (UFW)
  • Boycott of grapes to gain consumer support

31
Chart United States Latino Population
United States Latino Population
CHART
32
Chart Migrant Farmworkers Today
Migrant Farmworkers Today
CHART
33
Transparency The Latino Movement
The Latino Movement
TRANSPARENCY
34
Asian Americans
  • Japanese Americans want compensation for losses
    from 1940s
  • Japanese American Citizens League (JACL)
  • 1988 Congress apologizes and pays money

35
Note Taking Reading Skill Compare and Contrast
Reading Skill Compare and Contrast
NOTE TAKING
36
Native American Struggles
  • Snyder Act of 1924 granted citizenship to
    Native Americans
  • Late getting the right to vote
  • Suffered from poverty, unemployment, alcoholism,
    and suicide

37
Native American Activism
  • Land Claims Seneca lost land for a dam
  • Lawsuits filed to recover land
  • Leaders of the Indian Movement
  • Dennis Banks and George Mitchell
  • Organized the American Indian Movement (AIM)
  • Wanted autonomy or self-government

38
Confrontation
  • Broken Treaties Caravan groups traveled to
    Washington and occupied the Bureau of Indian
    Affairs for six days
  • Occupation of Alcatraz

39
Wounded Knee
  • 1973 Pine Ridge reservation
  • Russell Means and Dennis Banks with 200 AIM
    members took over
  • Government agreed to examine treaties

40
Outcome
  • Kennedy and Johnson administrations tried to
    bring jobs and income by encouraging industry to
    locate on reservations
  • Indian Education Act of 1972 gave more control
    over schools
  • Indian Self-Determination Act of 1974 autonomy
  • Some tribes won legal battles for money and land

41
Consumer Movement
  • Ralph Nader Unsafe at Any Speed The
    Designed-in Dangers of the American Automobile
  • Naders Raiders

42
Note Taking Reading Skill Identify Causes
Reading Skill Identify Causes
NOTE TAKING
43
Progress Monitoring Transparency Section 3
PM TRANSPARENCY
Progress Monitoring Transparency
44
The Environmental Movement Section 4
  • What forces gave rise to the environmental
    movement, and what impact did it have?
  • Vocabulary
  • -Rachel Carson Clean Air Act
  • -toxic waste Clean Water Act
  • -Earth Day EPA
  • -Endangered Species Act

45
Sec 4 The Environmental Movement
The Environmental Movement
Environmental Activists Speak Out Main Idea
Scientists began learning about environmental
threats, leading to environmental activism and
government legislation protecting the earth.
Environmental Setbacks Main Idea Hazardous
waste mishaps and accidents involving nuclear
energy led to further government regulation of
the environment, but many Americans complained
about too much control.
46
Note Taking Reading Skill Recognize Sequence
Reading Skill Recognize Sequence
NOTE TAKING
47
The Environmental Movement
  • Rachel Carson Silent Spring
  • Attacked the use of DDT and pesticides
  • Public more conscious of fumes, oil spills, and
    toxic wastes
  • Earth Day April 22, 1970

48
Government Actions
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 1970
  • Set and enforce national pollution-control
    standards
  • Clean Air Act
  • Clean Water Act

49
Environmental Setbacks
  • EPA investigates Love Canal high rates of birth
    defects and cancer caused by toxic waste
  • Congress established a Superfund to clean up
    hazardous waste

50
Chart Superfund Cleanup 2004
Superfund Cleanup, 2004
CHART
51
Nuclear Power
  • Plants to generate electricity
  • Less air pollution, but steam killed fish
  • Worry about nuclear accidents
  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

52
Transparency Three Mile Island
Three Mile Island
TRANSPARENCY
53
Progress Monitoring Transparency Section 4
PM TRANSPARENCY
Progress Monitoring Transparency
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