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P-12 MSOU Summer Conference Meeting the Challenge: Implementing Standards and Assessment Practices Embassy Suites, Lexington Preconference: July 25, 2011 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Featured Presenters:


1

P-12 MSOU Summer Conference
Meeting the Challenge Implementing Standards
and Assessment Practices
Embassy Suites, Lexington Preconference July
25, 2011 Conference July 26-27, 2011
  • Featured Presenters
  • Harvey Silver Jennifer Bay Williams
  • Jan Chappuis Myron Dueck
  • Carol Commodore

Register at http//www.uky.edu/P12MathScience/
2
Appalachian Teacher Partners
  • Appalachian Math Science Partnership
  • Master Teacher Project
  • Funded by the National Science Foundation
  • April 6, 2011
  • We will begin at 901

3
Group Norms
  • Place cell phones on silent or vibrate
  • Come prepared for each meeting
  • Listen actively as others are speaking
  • Avoid sidebar conversations
  • Respect and solicit opinions
  • Rule of 2 feet

4
February Review
Selected Response Analysis
High Level Question Analysis
The formative-assessment process
5
Roadmap for Today
Subject Break Outs
6
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7
T-chart Time
8
Informing the Journey
  • Using pages 1 and 2 of the article, Linking
    Principles of Formative Assessment to Classroom
    Practice,
  • Identify the lessons learned in this case
    example
  • How can use these lessons learned to inform your
    journey towards assessment literacy and your
    inform the work you may be asked to do as a
    teacher leader in your district.
  • Be prepared to share key points from your
    conversation with the whole group.

9
Take Home Message
  • Assessment literacy is not hard learning, but it
    is slow learning, and it requires sustained and
    targeted support at all levels of the system.

10
Linking Principles of Formative Assessment to
Classroom Practice
  • Learning Targets
  • Apply 7 of 10 principles of FA in utilizing
    standards related to Fractions.
  • Describe a (and modify as needed) sample process
    for linking principles of formative assessment to
    classroom practice.

11
Principle One
Prior to teaching, teachers study and can
articulate the math concepts students will be
learning.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section I.
  • 3 tasks, 2 resources, 4 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a Partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 10 minutes

12
Fraction Considerations from CTS
  • Need experience before alogrithms
  • Use of number line
  • Use of a variety of models
  • Area, length, set or quantity
  • Use of benchmark fractions and comparing
    fractions
  • Work with equivalence of fractions then decimals
    and per cents
  • Work on judging relative size of numbers
  • Importance of estimation and developing these
    skills
  • Concept of fair shares/equal shares
  • Concept of whole
  • Part of whole,
  • Emphasizing meanings other than part - whole
  • a collection,
  • division of number,
  • ratio
  • Meaning of (not definition of) numerator and
    denominator
  • Partitioning and iterating

13
  • Using CTS to establish the structure of
    conceptual knowledge in a topic helps educators
    shift the emphasis from lower level facts,
    definitions, and formulas to the important
    middle- and upper-level conceptual ideas needed
    to develop deeper understanding.
  • Mathematics Curriculum Topic Study, pg. 60

14
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle one, then what?

15
  • Teachers cannot effectively promote learning
    beyond their own mathematical content knowledge.
  • Li Ping Ma, 1999

16
Assessment for Learning Strategies
  • Where am I going?
  • 1. Provide a clear statement of the learning
    target
  • 2. Use examples and models
  • Where am I now?
  • 3. Offer regular descriptive feedback
  • 4. Teach students to self-assess and set goals
  • How can I close the gap?
  • 5. Design focused lessons
  • 6. Teach students focused revision
  • 7. Engage students in self-reflection let them
    keep track of and share their learning

16
17
Principle Two
Teachers use student-friendly language to inform
students about the math objective they are
expected to learn during the lesson.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section II.
  • 2 tasks, 3 resources, 3 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 10 minutes

18
Closer Look at Progression charts
19
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20
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21
Grade Level/ Course (HS) 2nd Grade Math Grade Level/ Course (HS) 2nd Grade Math
Standard with code 2.OA.2 Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies2. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers. 2See standard 1.OA.6 for list of mental strategies.
Domain Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Add and Subtract within 20
Type ______Knowledge __X___Reasoning ______Performance Skill ______Product Type ______Knowledge __X___Reasoning ______Performance Skill ______Product
Knowledge Targets Reasoning Targets Performance Skills Targets Product Targets
Know mental strategies for addition and subtraction Apply mental strategies to add and subtract fluently within 20.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to precision. Look for and make use of structure. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
22
Know mental strategies for addition and
subtraction.
  • I am learning to use mental strategies for
    addition and subtraction.
  • I am to use mental strategies for addition and
    subtraction.
  • I know some ways to add and subtract in my head,
    without using a pencil and paper, objects, or my
    fingers.
  • I know some ways to add (put together) and
    subtract (take away) in my head, without using a
    pencil and paper, objects, or my fingers.
  • I know some mental strategies. These are ways to
    add and subtract in my head, without using a
    pencil and paper, objects, or my fingers.

23
Apply mental strategies to add and subtract
fluently within 20.
  • I can apply mental strategies to add and subtract
    fluently within 20.
  • I can apply mental strategies to add and subtract
    fluently within 20.
  • I can use some ways to add and subtract in my
    head to quickly tell the answer to problems.
  • I can use my mental strategies to quickly add and
    subtract problems with numbers up to 20.

24
Grade Level/ Course (HS) Algebra Grade Level/ Course (HS) Algebra
Standard with code A.APR.1 Understand that polynomials form a system analogous to the integers, namely, they are closed under the operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication add, subtract, and multiply polynomials.
Domain Arithmetic with Polynomial and Rational Expressions
Cluster Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials
Type ___X___Knowledge ______Reasoning ______Performance Skill ______Product Type ___X___Knowledge ______Reasoning ______Performance Skill ______Product
Knowledge Targets Reasoning Targets Performance Skills Targets Product Targets
Identify that the sum, difference, or product of two polynomials will always be a polynomial, which means that polynomials are closed under the operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication. Define closure. Apply arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication to polynomials.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to precision. Look for and make use of structure. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
25
Identify that the sum, difference, or product of
two polynomials will always be a polynomial,
which means that polynomials are closed under the
operations of addition, subtraction, and
multiplication.
  • I can identify that the sum, difference, or
    product of two polynomials will always be a
    polynomial, which means that polynomials are
    closed under the operations of addition,
    subtraction, and multiplication.
  • I can identify how the sum, difference, or
    product of two polynomials will be alike.
  • I can explain what it means for polynomials to be
    closed under the operations of addition,
    subtraction, and multiplication.
  • I can identify what the sum (answer when adding),
    difference (answer when subtracting), or product
    (answer when multiplying) of two polynomials will
    always be.

26
Define closure.
  • I can define closure.
  • I can define closure as it applies to
    polynomials.
  • I can tell what it means for polynomials to be
    closed under the operations of addition,
    subtraction, and multiplication.

27
Apply arithmetic operations of addition,
subtraction, and multiplication to polynomials.
  • I can apply arithmetic operations of addition,
    subtraction, and multiplication to polynomials.
  • I can add, subtract, and multiply polynomials.
  • I can add polynomials.
  • I can subtract polynomials
  • I can multiply polynomials.

28
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle two, then what?

29
  • The learning goals and success criteria drive the
    whole process of formative assessment.
  • Margaret Heritage

30
  • There is a diagnostic aspect to all formative
    assessment, and diagnostic information can inform
    both students studying and teachers teaching.
    The key is having a concept of the goal or
    learning target, which originally is the
    teachers, but which ideally the student will
    internalize, eventually setting his or her own
    goals and monitoring progress toward them.
  • Brookhart, 2001

31
Principle Three
Students can describe what mathematical ideas
they are learning in the lesson.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section III.
  • 1 task, 3 resources, 3 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review the task and related
    resources individually, then complete the task
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 10 minutes

32
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle three, then what?

33
  • There is a body of research that indicates that
    when students are given learning goals, goals
    that describe the intended learning, they perform
    significantly better than students who are given
    performance goals, goals that focus on task
    completionIt focuses their attention on learning
    by helping them understand the assignment is the
    means and the learning is the end.
  • Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning, pg.
    18

34
Principle Four
Teachers can articulate how the math lesson is
aligned to district learning targets, state
standards, and classroom assessments, and fits
within the progression of student learning.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section IV.
  • 3 tasks, 3 resources, 3 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 10 minutes

35
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle four, then what?

36
  • The single most important method for routinely
    sharing learning targets is using assignments
    that match really match the learning goal.
    It is in the assignment that the teacher
    translates the learning goal into action for the
    student.
  • Moss and Brookhart, 2009, pg. 25

37
Inter-District Discussion
  • Focus Question How would these first 4
    principles strengthen teacher practice and impact
    student learning?
  • Meet with two other participants from different
    tables to discuss. (6 mins.)

38
  • Implementing the formative assessment process
    across a school involves changing the beliefs
    that teachers hold about how students learn and
    reframing the role teachers play in supporting
    that learning.
  • Moss Brookhart, 2009, pg. 135

39
T-chart Time
40
5 Keys to Quality Classroom Assessment
  • Divide the 5 keys among your table group.
  • Using the following resources, create an icon for
    your key and write a gist statement for it.
  • CASL pgs. 12-18, 27
  • Share with your tablemates.
  • Discuss methods for helping
  • teachers internalize these keys.

41
ACCURACY
EFFECTIVE USE
PURPOSE
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
TARGET
41
41
42
Ensure Assessment Quality Action 3
  • Learning Target
  • I can justify the type of assessment method for
    each target type derived from a the standards.

43
Ensure Assessment Quality
  • Determine the type of assessment that will be
    used to gather evidence of students achievement
    of the learning target.
  • Select a proper assessment method for each
    target.
  • Most efficient method to gather evidence that
    provides accurate information.

44
Target Method Match
  • Why might it be important to identify the type of
    target?
  • What are some generalizations that can be made
    about assessment methods for each target type?

45
Knowledge Targets
Reasoning Targets
Skill Targets
Product Targets
Hold a pencil correctly Print letters correctly
according to DN methods Space words Use lines and
margins correctly Stretch out sounds in
Know what a sentence is Understand concept of
word choice
Write sentences with varied beginnings
Distinguish the uses or meanings of a variety of
words (word choice)
Assessments How will I promote the learning and
audit the achievement of the targets and standard?
? FOR/Formative ? OF/Summative
? FOR/Formative ? OF/Summative
? FOR/Formative ? OF/Summative
? FOR/Formative ? OF/Summative
46
Knowledge Targets
Reasoning Targets
Skill Targets
Product Targets
Know what a sentence is Understand concept of
word choice
Write sentences with varied beginnings
Hold a pencil correctly Print letters correctly
according to DN methods Space words Use lines and
margins correctly Stretch out sounds in
Distinguish the uses or meanings of a variety of
words (word choice)
Assessments How will I promote the learning and
audit the achievement of the targets and standard?
Formative ? Summative
X Formative Summative
X Formative ? Summative
X Formative ? Summative
47
Knowledge Targets
Reasoning Targets
Skill Targets
Product Targets
Know what a sentence is Understand concept of
word choice
Write sentences with varied beginnings
Hold a pencil correctly Print letters correctly
according to DN methods Space words Use lines and
margins correctly Stretch out sounds in
Distinguish the uses or meanings of a variety of
words (word choice)
Assessments How will I promote the learning and
audit the achievement of the targets and standard?
X Formative ? Summative
X Formative ? Summative
X Formative Summative
X Formative ? Summative
48
Knowledge Targets
Reasoning Targets
Skill Targets
Product Targets
Know what a sentence is Understand concept of
word choice
Write sentences with varied beginnings
Hold a pencil correctly Print letters correctly
according to DN methods Space words Use lines and
margins correctly Stretch out sounds in
Distinguish the uses or meanings of a variety of
words (word choice)
Assessments How will I promote the learning and
audit the achievement of the targets and standard?
X Formative ? Summative
X Formative Summative
X Formative ? Summative
X Formative ? Summative
? Performance
? Selected Response ? Ext. Written
Response ? Personal Communication
  • Selected Response
  • ? Ext. Written Response
  • Performance
  • ? Personal Communication

? Performance ? Personal Communication
49
Ensure Assessment Quality
  • Examine the deconstruction of 3.G.2.
  • Identify the type of assessment that will be used
    for each target type (FA and/or SA) and mark that
    on the deconstruction.
  • Determine the assessment method(s) (SR, EWR, PA,
    PC) that will be used for each target type and
    mark that on the deconstruction.
  • Share with an elbow partner.

50
Ensure Assessment Quality Action 3
  • Learning Target
  • I can justify the type of assessment method for
    each target type derived from a the standards.

51
Take Home Message
  • The heart of accuracy in classroom assessment
    revolves around matching different kinds of
    achievement targetsto the appropriate assessment
    method.
  • CASL, pg. 95

52
Principle Five
Teachers use classroom assessments that yield
accurate information about student learning of
math concepts and skills and use of math
processes.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section V.
  • 4 tasks, 4 resources, 3 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 15 minutes

53
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle five, then what?

54
  • Good assessment means clearly knowing what it is
    you want to assess and then choosing the best
    method to get the job done, whichdepends on the
    purpose and the learning targets being assessed.
  • CASL, pg. 94

55
Principle Six
Teachers use assessment information to focus and
guide teaching and motivate student learning.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section VI.
  • 2 tasks, 4 resources, 5 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 15 minutes

56
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle six, then what?

57
T-chart Time
58
(No Transcript)
59
(No Transcript)
60
Current Status of U.S. Educational Assessment
System
  • Three Positives
  • Four Negatives
  • Reduction of assessment bias in large-scale tests
  • Research ratification of the formative assessment
    process
  • Increased advocacy of the formative assessment
    process
  • Educators abysmal assessment literacy
  • Uncritical adoption of interim assessment
    system(s)
  • Computer adapted testings seductive allure
  • Instructionally insensitive accountability tests

James Popham, July 2010
61
Principle Seven
Feedback given to a student is descriptive,
frequent, and timely. It provides insight on a
current strength and focuses on one facet of
learning for revision linked directly to the
intended math objective.
  • Using your Putting It All Together organizer,
    complete Section VII.
  • 4 tasks, 7 resources, 4 guiding questions
  • Take a minute to review tasks and related
    resources individually, then complete the tasks
    with a partner.
  • Use the guiding questions to focus your work.
  • Time 10 minutes

62
Processing the Principle
  • If we dont do principle seven, then what?

63
  • Effective feedback is a teachers response to
    student work using the criteria for good work
    that were part of the learning target. Effective
    feedback observes where the work did a good job
    of meeting the criteria and where it did not.
    Effective feedback suggests ways the student
    could go about understanding the reasons for
    these observations, building on strengths and
    improving weaknesses.
  • Moss Brookhart, 2009, pg. 45

64
  • More effort has to be spent in framing questions
    that are worth asking that is, questions that
    are critical to the development of student
    understanding.
  • Black, Harrison, Lee, Marshall, Wiliam, 2003

65
Linking Principles of Formative Assessment to
Classroom Practice
  • Learning Targets
  • Apply 7 of 10 principles of FA in utilizing
    deconstructed standards.
  • Describe a (and modify as needed) sample process
    for linking principles of formative assessment to
    classroom practice.

66
What do teachers need to know and be able to do
to be assessment literate?
  • As a table group, prepare a five minute
    presentation your administrators, which addresses
    the questions, What do teachers need to know and
    be able to do to be assessment literate? What
    happens if they are not?
  • Identify milestones
  • Identify related PD needs

67
Creating a climate for improvement
  • Teacher learning is just like any other learning
    in a highly complex area
  • In the same way that teachers cannot do the
    learning for their learners, leaders cannot do
    the learning for their teachers
  • What is needed from teachers
  • A commitment to the continuous improvement of
    practice and
  • A focus on those things that make a difference to
    students
  • What is needed from leaders
  • A commitment to engineer effective learning
    environments for teachers
  • creating expectations for the continuous
    improvement of practice
  • keeping the focus on the things that make a
    difference to students
  • providing the time, space, dispensation and
    support for innovation
  • supporting risk-taking
  • Dylan Wiliam, 2010

68
  • Optimal learning environments flourish in schools
    where formative assessment is not just what
    educators do but is an indicator of what
    educators believe in and value. (pg. 150)
  • teaching students how to learn, instead of
    merely what to learn, is valuable work that is
    well worth doing. (pg. 151)
  • Moss Brookhart, 2009

69
T-chart Time
70
Roadmap for Today
Subject Break Outs
71
Preparation for the Summer Meeting
  • Summer dates
  • June 14-16 and July 21-22
  • Reading in preparation for the meeting CASL
    Chapters 10-12 and How to Grade for Learning
    page. 2-24.

The principle goal of education is to create
people who are capable of doing new things, not
simply repeating what other generations have done
people who are creative, inventive,
discoverers. Jean Piaget
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