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Embedding Graduate Attributes in ACU Programs

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Embedding Graduate Attributes in ACU Programs Associate Professor Mark Freeman Session outcomes Explain the importance of planning, implementing and assuring graduate ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Embedding Graduate Attributes in ACU Programs


1
Embedding Graduate Attributes in ACU Programs
  • Associate Professor Mark Freeman

2
Session outcomes
  1. Explain the importance of planning, implementing
    and assuring graduate attributes in ACU programs
  2. Identify the steps to embed graduate attributes
  3. Outline ALTC resources that can be used to assist
    in the embedding process
  4. Reflect on next steps

3
Session outcomes
  1. Explain the importance of planning, implementing
    and assuring graduate attributes in ACU programs
  2. Identify the steps to embed graduate attributes
  3. Outline ALTC resources that can be used to assist
    in the embedding process
  4. Reflect on next steps

4
Taking the pulse
  • Consider your flagship UG degree.
  • In 2 minutes
  • How well is it hitting the mark?
  • Whats your evidence?
  • Convince your neighbour (1 minute each)

5
Do our programs develop the right attributes in
our graduates so they can get the right jobs?
6
Handout do activity
  • Individually do both MCQ in 1 minute
  • As a table debate and agree using scratchoffs
    until correct (indicated by )
  • As a table choose best option - 2 minutes

7
ACU graduate attributes
  • (i) Intellectual
  • Critical and analytical abilities.
  • Enthusiasm to search for further knowledge and
    understanding.
  • Open-mindedness and receptiveness to new ideas.
  • Expertise in chosen academic field.
  • (ii) Professional
  • Knowledge and skills to meet relevant
    professional requirements.
  • Understanding of and commitment to professional
    ethical standards.
  • Information literacy, communication and
    interpersonal skills.
  • (iii) Values
  • Commitment to values consistent with the
    Universitys Mission.
  • A spirit of service to the community.
  • Commitment to good citizenship, including
    respect for individuals, empathy with persons of
    differing cultural and religious backgrounds,
    community responsibility and concern for the
    environment.
  • A high regard for equity and human rights in
    the context of a broad understanding of
    globalization.

8
Session outcomes
  1. Explain the importance of planning, implementing
    and assuring graduate attributes in ACU programs
  2. Identify the steps to embed graduate attributes
  3. Outline ALTC resources that can be used to assist
    in the embedding process
  4. Reflect on next steps

9
On your table, decide the steps needed to plan,
deliver and assure graduate attributes are
embedded in your ACU programs/courses
10
Action research
Plan
Reflect
Act
Observe
11
Planning and assuring our programs hit the mark
  1. Define program learning goals and outcomesWhat
    are the most important things our students should
    learn in our program? What are our expectations?
  2. Align curriculum with program goalsHow or where
    will they learn these things?
  3. Identify instruments and measuresHow will we
    know they have learned them?
  4. Collect, analyse and disseminate dataHow well
    have they learned them?
  5. Use assurance data for continuous
    improvementWhat will we do if they have not
    learned them?

12
Key guidelines
Do case study. Then identify on the grid where
your flagship PG coursework program lies.
  • Define learning goals and objectives
  • Check goals aligned to mission and program is
    distinctive
  • Minimum 1 program goal for each of 11 graduate
    attributes
  • Only 1 program learning outcome per goal
  • Involve peers and/or industry
  • Align curriculum with goals
  • Use template for curriculum alignment across a
    program
  • Identify where goal is introduced, developed,
    graduating and assured
  • Consider incorporating a capstone unit
  • Identify instruments and measures
  • Use template align Unit learning outcomes,
    activities, assessment, criteria
  • Measure program outcomes in embedded assessments
    in capstone
  • Involve peers and/or industry in setting
    assessment criteria and intervention
    trigger/benchmark

13
Key guidelines
  • Collect, analyse and disseminate data
  • Consider software to support data collection
  • Involve peers and/or industry
  • Use assurance data for continuous improvement
  • Involve peers and/or industry to close the loop
  • Identify improvement actions (eg. curriculum,
    pedagogy, measure)

14
General Management Leadership
Discipline focused
Pre-experience career
15
Curriculum alignment eg. Masters
M601 M602 M603 M604 M605 M606 M607 M608 M609/ M610
Learning goal 1 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Learning goal 2 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Learning goal 3 Intro Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Learning goal 4 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Learning goal 5 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Sem 1
Sem 2
Sem 3
Unit
Program
16
Program-wide planning matters
  • Where there is a greater sense of the holistic
    programme students are likely to achieve higher
    standards than on more fragmented programmes
    (Havnes, p. 2007)
  • Slowly learnt academic literacies require
    rehearsal and practice throughout a programme
    (Knight and Yorke 2004)

17
Curriculum alignment eg. Masters
Sem 1
Sem 2
Sem 3
M601 M602 M603 M604 M605 M606 M607 M608 M609/ M610
Learning goal 5 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Unit
Program
  • Note
  • Development is iterative not additive (hence
    arrows overlap)
  • Assurance is typically undertaken at graduating
    level when program learning goal is achieved or
    mastered.

18
Curriculum alignment effectively work in
multi-cultural team
Sem 1
Sem 2
Sem 3
M601 M602 M603 M604 M605 M606 M607 M608 M609/ M610
Learning goal 5 Intro Extend Extend Extend Extend Mastered and assured
Unit
Program
19
A common myth
  • It is a common belief that tertiary students
    acquire intercultural communication competence
    through interacting with each other in
    multicultural classrooms. Much research
    undertaken in Australia, however, indicates that
    having culturally diverse classrooms will not, by
    itself, necessarily promote student development
    in this area (Briguglio, 2005)

20
Pay strong attention to assessment
  • From our students point of view, assessment
    always defines the actual curriculum
    (Ramsden, P.,1992)
  • Assessment defines what students regard as
    important, how they spend their time and how they
    come to see themselves as students and then as
    graduates.........If you want to change student
    learning then change the methods of assessment
    (Brown, G et al, 1997)
  • Assessment patterns may be a much better
    predictor of student effort than teaching
    patterns. Students may skip classes and may not
    prepare well for classes but they make sure that
    they submit the necessary assignments
    (Gibbs,THES, 28 Sept 2007, p.6)

21
  • Conventional assessment procedures are unable to
    do justice to the most important outcomes of any
    educational process worth the name (Raven
    1991, p1)
  • Even when lecturers say that they want students
    to be creative and thoughtful, students often
    recognise that what is really necessary, or at
    least what is sufficient, is to memorise
    (Gibbs, 1992, p. 10)
  • Many research findings indicate a declining use
    of deep and contextual approaches to study as
    students progress through their degree
    programmes
  • (Watkins Hattie, 1985 Kember et al,
    1997 Richardson, 2000 Zhang Watkins, 2001)
  • The pressures of increased student numbers and
    the growing demands of QA procedures has changed
    the nature of assignments and tests, making them
    less open ended and less likely to foster a deep
    and thoughtful approach to studying (Gibbs
    cited in Bryan and Clegg, 2006, p.21
  • The types of assessment we currently use do not
    promote conceptual understanding and do not
    encourage a deep approach to learningOur means
    of assessing them seems to do little to encourage
    them to adopt anything other than a strategic or
    mechanical approach to their studies.
    (Newstead 2002, p3)
  • This quest for reliability tends to skew
    assessment towards the assessment of simple and
    unambiguous achievements, and considerations of
    cost add to the skew away from judgements of
    complex learning (Knight 2002b p278)
  • students become more interested in the mark and
    less interested in the subject over the course of
    their studies. (Newstead 2002, p2)
  • Our current systems focused on marks and grades
    arent working
  • (Rust 2007 Elander Hardman, 2002 Laming,
    1990 Yorke et al, 2002 Bridges et al, 2002
    Newstead and Dennis, 1994)

22
Unit of Study curriculum alignment (incl
assessment criteria)
23
Assessing and assuring a relevant program
learning goal effectively work in
multi-cultural team
Instrument Student activity Criteria Unacceptable/ Fail Acceptable/ Pass Exceed/Credit/ Distinction
Expert uses rubric (containing assessment criteria) to assess individual students observed working in teams and dealing with feedback (including peer assessment) at several points over semester and improving. NB. The assessment criteria (rubric) might be paper-based or electronically completed (using the Facultys tool ReView or SPARK) or via a paper-based sheet. Students complete assessment task in multi-cultural teams. Students undertake self- and peer-assessment of team process on formative basis early in team task and on completion for summative purposes. Students have in-class discussion after each self and peer assessment. Teams discuss both team processes and team tasks, referring also to aggregate self and peer feedback. Eg. Various relating to expert observing in-class how students work completing team assessments Eg. Various relating to peers feedback on team process (eg. effective listening) and tasks (eg. Pre-meeting reparation) out of class Eg. Various relating to expert observing in-class how student reflects on peer feedback develops improvementt strategy Eg. Student observed poorly contributing or engaged in team assessment Eg. Peers provide negative feedback on students contribution Eg. No evidence of student participating in peer feedback during in-class discussion (or self /peer assessment process) Eg. Student observed interacting inclusively in team assessment Eg. Peers provide positive feedback on students contribution Eg. Student observed actively participating in class discussion of peer feedback Eg. Student observed harnessing members to focus on team assessment Eg. Peers provide highly affirmative recognition on students contribution as leader Eg. Student develops improvement strategy after reflecting on peer feedback.
24
ReView in practice at USyd
  • Graduate attributes at University of Sydney and
    reflected in ReView

25
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26
acctg
27
Session outcomes
  1. Explain the importance of planning, implementing
    and assuring graduate attributes in ACU programs
  2. Identify the steps to embed graduate attributes
  3. Outline ALTC resources that can be used to assist
    in the embedding process
  4. Reflect on next steps

28
Elements of the ALTC Strategy
Teaching Quality Indicators
Promoting Excellence
Competitive Grants Program
Discipline Networks
Special Initiatives
Leadership Program
ALTC Exchange
Australian Learning Teaching Council
Learning Networks
Grants Scheme
Priority Projects Program
International Links
Fellowship Scheme
Awards Scheme
Awards (Teaching Programs)
National Teaching Fellows
Teaching Fellows
Citations
29
ALTC graduate attribute initiatives
  • Funded one national Fellow
  • Funding national event late 2009 (early 2010)
  • Funded 24 nationally collaborative projects
  • Projects cover wide range of disciplines
  • Community of practice developing (Oct 08
    Symposium)
  • See handout

30
ALTC Business
  • Appoint Discipline Scholar
  • Funded range of projects including
  • Completed (EDIC), nearly completed (EGA, AFF),
    started (GS,PR)
  • Develop ALTC Exchange resources
  • Summaries of projects and themes
  • Useful project resources (eg. developing
    intercultural competence)
  • Develop collaboratively with deans council (ie.
    ABDC) a Discipline Support Strategy
  • Collaboratively follow up national issues
    identified Dec08 Leading Change Symposium
  • 2009 Curriculum and engagement
  • 2010 Student leaning experience
  • 2011 Staff engagement

31
ALTC Accounting for the Future Project goals
  • To identify the range of non-technical skills
    expected and required of accounting graduates,
  • To identify stakeholders views on the relative
    importance of the technical v non-technical
    skills required and on the respective
    responsibilities of employers and universities
    for their development.
  • To identify examples of best practice by which
    non-technical skills can be embedded in
    accounting programs and their learning is
    assured.

32
On your table, rank the following
  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Problem solving
  • Self-management
  • Planning and organising
  • Technology
  • Life-long learning
  • Initiative and enterprise
  • Ability to deal with diversity

33
ALTC Accounting for the Future Importance of
the non-technical skills
  • Communication 1
  • Problem solving 2
  • Teamwork 3
  • Self-management 4
  • Life-long learning 5
  • Initiative and enterprise 6
  • Planning and organising 7
  • Ability to deal with diversity 8
  • Technology 9

34
ALTC Accounting for the Future How well do you
consider you are able to develop and assess these
skills? NB 1not at all 5excellent
35
ALTC Accounting for the Future External
stakeholder interviews
  • Common themes that have emerged across the
    country
  • Views on technical skills ability of graduates
    varied by size and location of employers.
  • Views on importance of non-technical skills
    varied by size and location of employers
  • Communication, team work and self management were
    deemed to be the most desirable.
  • Communication and problem solving being the most
    inadequate and posing the greatest limitations on
    graduates in both their skill sets and their
    career development.

36
ALTC Accounting for the FutureGood practice
example of programs with embedded graduate
attributes
  • Macquarie university
  • language for professional communication in
    accounting
  • embedding skills in 10 of the 13 MPA units
  • evidence to support success in relation to
    improvement in communication skills.

37
  • ALTC Embedding the Development of Intercultural
    Competence in Business Education
  • See handout
  • See ATLC Exchange

38
ALTC Exchange
http//www.altcexchange.edu.au/1-embedding-develop
ment-intercultural-competence-business-higher-educ
ation
39
3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Knowledge
Attitudes
Skills
Applies basic skills or directions to
routine tasks and interactions to accommodate
(a) specified cultural difference/s
Identifies cultural foundations of own and
others norms, values, experiences and
interactions
Acknowledges the practical significance of own
and others cultural identity (beliefs, values,
norms and biases) and their impact on behaviour
and interactions
Awareness
Implements appropriate processes and behaviours
for interactions with different cultural
settings and audiences
Analyses how diversity influences interaction
(and how culture manifests itself in interaction)
Adapts to differences between oneself and
others in interactions in varying cultural
contexts
Understanding
Selects or creates complex skill sets in
interactions under conditions of uncertainty,
risk and change in professional business
situations
Reflects and self-evaluates ones own and
others capabilities and limitations in
interactions in varying cultural contexts
Values intercultural interactions and
experiences with those from other cultures to
further ones own understanding and interactions
Autonomy
Ridings, Simpson, Leask et al. 2008
40
Session outcomes
  1. Explain the importance of planning, implementing
    and assuring graduate attributes in ACU programs
  2. Identify the steps to embed graduate attributes
  3. Outline ALTC resources that can be used to assist
    in the embedding process
  4. Reflect on next steps

41
Next steps
  • Reflect quietly on todays discussion.
  • Identify the top three actions you intend to take
    to get graduate attributes really embedded in the
    programs in your school
  • Share around the table briefly one priority

42
Challenges to embedding graduate attributes
  • Achieve wider buy-in
  • Leaders, program directors, academics
  • Employers/peers
  • Establish suitable policies and procedures to
    support it
  • Develop appropriate reward systems for academic
    buy-in
  • Appoint empowered program directors
  • Establish a QA sub ctee?
  • Develop a plan for defining goals, planning
    curriculum and assurance points
  • Agree rubrics for embedded assessments
  • Develop procedure to obtain and use data on
    actual student development for continuous
    improvement
  • Obtain suitable support resources and tools
  • Curriculum mapping templates and tools
  • Access emergent research eg. ALTC collaborative
    projects

43
  • Q A

44
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45
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46
Need for Change (3)The nature of standards
  • An indispensable condition for improvement in
    student learning is that
  • the student comes to hold a concept of quality
    roughly similar to that held by the teacher
    (Sadler, 1989)
  • Standards are often communicated to students
    using criteria.
  • Regulative and logical criteria standards can be
    defined in terms of well-defined outcomes
    (Sadler, 1987, p. 70)
  • Prescriptive and constitutive criteria refer to
    matters of degree and It would be difficult or
    impossible to guess the educational level at
    which they are applicable (Sadler, 1987, p.
    70). Such types of criteria are often
    interdependent and can only be assessed using
    holistic/professional judgement (Sadler, 2008)
  • Such criteria are socially constructed requiring
    the sharing of tacit knowledge over time
    (ODonovan et al, 2004 Rust et al, 2005)

47
Need for change (5)Coming to understand
standards
  • The achievement of high-level learning requires
    integrated and coherent progression based on
    programme outcomes
  • The most significant factor in student academic
    success is student involvement fostered by
    student/staff interactions and student/student
    interactions (Astin, 1997)
  • The only common factor in a study of departments
    deemed excellent in both research and learning
    and teaching is high levels of student
    involvement (Gibbs, 2007)
  • Where there is a greater sense of the holistic
    programme students are likely to achieve higher
    standards than on more fragmented programmes
    (Havnes, p. 2007)
  • Slowly learnt academic literacies require
    rehearsal and practice throughout a programme
    (Knight and Yorke 2004)
  • Students need to engage as interactive partners
    in a learning community, relinquishing the
    passive role of the instructed within processes
    controlled by academic experts (Gibbs et al,
    2004)
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