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Mississippi Department of Education Common Core State Standards and Assessments English / Language Arts Grades 9-12 Training of the Trainers July 2012 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Mississippi Department of Education


1
Mississippi Department of EducationCommon Core
State Standardsand Assessments
English / Language Arts Grades 9-12 Training of
the Trainers July 2012
2
All page references are from this document
unless otherwise noted.
3
Survey
  • Currently, what is your comfort level related to
    the Common Core State Standards for ELA?
  • Not comfortable
  • Somewhat comfortable
  • Very comfortable
  • Please respond using the Promethean device.

4
  • General Overview of
  • CCSS for ELA

5
Key Design Considerations
  • Grade levels and grade bands
  • Focus on results rather than means
  • Integrated model of literacy
  • Research and media throughout
  • Shared responsibility including focus on
    informational text
  • Focus and coherence in instruction and assessment

6
Students Who Are College and Career Ready in
Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and
Language
Refer to p. 7
7
Organization of CCSS for ELA
  • Introduction
  • Three main sections
  • K-5 (comprehensive and cross disciplinary)
  • 6-12 English Language Arts
  • 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,
    and Technical Subjects
  • Three appendices
  • Appendix A Research supporting key elements of
    the standards (includes text complexity) and
    glossary of key terms
  • Appendix B Reading text exemplars and sample
    performance tasks
  • Appendix C Annotated student writing samples

Refer to p. 8
8
Organization For Grades 9-12
  • Four Strands of Standards
  • Reading (R)
  • RL (Reading Standards for Literature)
  • RI (Reading Standards for Informational Text)
  • Writing (W)
  • Speaking and Listening (SL)
  • Language (L)
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards

Refer to p. 8
9
College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards
  • College and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor
    Standards drive the grade-specific standards.
  • Identify by strand and CCR number. (Refer to p.
    8)
  • Example of identifying (R.CCR.6Reading College
    and Career Readiness Anchor Standard 6 is assess
    how point of view or purpose shapes the content
    and style of a text.) (Refer to p. 35)

10
Grade Specific Standards
  • Grade-specific standards define what students
    should know and be able to do by the end of each
    year or grade band to progress toward achievement
    of each anchor standard.
  • Identify by strand, grade, number (or number and
    letter)
  • Example of identifying (RI.9-10.6 is determine
    an authors point of view or purpose in a text
    and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to
    advance that point of view or purpose.)
  • RI Reading Informational Text
  • 9-10 Grade Band
  • 6 Standard

11
Key Features
  • Reading
  • Text complexity increases with each grade level
  • Comprehension demands increase with each grade
    level
  • Writing
  • Text types--argument and informative/explanatory
    writing (in addition to narrative)
  • Writing about texts and other sources
  • Research (also included across standards)
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Collaboration
  • Range of oral communication and interpersonal
    skills
  • Language
  • General academic and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Essential rules of standard written and spoken
    English with a focus on craft and informed
    choices

12
Work Session 1 Scavenger Hunt
  • Locate Work Session 1 Activity Sheet.
  • Directions
  • Knowing where to find information in the
    Standards is just as important as knowing the
    information itself. Using the Common Core State
    Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts (ELA),
    search with others at your table (in groups of 2,
    3, or 4) to find the answers to the questions.

13
Work Session 1 Scavenger Hunt
  • Discuss answers for Work Session 1 CCSS for ELA
    Scavenger Hunt.

14
  • Unpacking the ELA Common Core State Standards
  • Committing to the Process

15
Unpacking CCSS for ELA Overview
  • WHY?
  • Unpacking helps teachers identify the skills and
    thinking students will need to know and be able
    to do in order to meet the standards.
  • HOW?
  • Begin by identifying key verbs and key terms in
    the CCSS that may be unfamiliar to students, as
    well as the key content that students should
    already know.
  • Next, write the identified words in language that
    students will readily understand
    (student-friendly) and that teachers can easily
    explain to students.
  • Finally, develop I can statements for students
    to understand the language of the standard
    (defines what students should know and/or be able
    to do).

16
Evaluating the Progression of a Standard Grades
6-8
(Handout 1)
17
Evaluating the Progression of a Standard Grades
9-12
(Handout 2)
18
Step One Unpacking the Standards
  • Identify key verbs and key terms in the CCSS that
    may be unfamiliar to students. Also list key
    content with which they may be familiar.
  • RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument
    and specific claims in a text, assessing whether
    the reasoning is valid and the evidence is
    relevant and sufficient identify false
    statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • Key Verbs
  • Delineate
  • Evaluate
  • Assessing
  • Identify
  • Key Terms
  • Fallacious
  • Key Content
  • Argument
  • Claims
  • Reasoning

19
Step Two Unpacking the Standards
  • Write the key verbs and key terms in language
    that students will readily understand
    (student-friendly) and that teachers can easily
    explain to students. The key content should
    already be student-friendly.
  • RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument
    and specific claims in a text, assessing whether
    the reasoning is valid and the evidence is
    relevant and sufficient identify false
    statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • Key Verbs
  • Delineate describe precisely
  • Evaluate judge or find the value of
  • Assessing determining the quality of
  • Identify recognize or point out
  • Key Terms
  • Fallacious misleading or deceiving
  • Key Content
  • Argument a belief or stance on an issue or
    topic
  • Claims statements made about an issue
  • Reasoning the thoughts behind an opinion
  • Evidence supporting documents, thoughts, or
    statements

20
Step Three Unpacking the Standards
  • Develop I can statements for students to
    understand the language of the standard. The
    statements should serve as examples of what
    students will know and be able to do.  
  • RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument
    and specific claims in a text, assessing whether
    the reasoning is valid and the evidence is
    relevant and sufficient identify false
    statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • I can identify, describe and judge the value of
    an authors stance on a topic and can determine
    the quality of the evidence provided.
  • I can statements may also be written as stepping
    stones to help students build their knowledge
    incrementally.

21
Work Session 2Unpacking CCSS for ELA
  • Locate Work Session 2 Activity Sheets
  • Directions
  • Participants will use the Unpacking the Standards
    form to unpack the standard indicated on the top
    of each form.
  • Participants will identify and record key verbs
    and terms, rewriting these terms in
    student-friendly language, and develop I can
    statements for students.

22
Unpacking Application
  • What are skills that students should know and be
    able to do in order to master the Speaking and
    Listening standards that were discussed?
  • How does unpacking contribute to my understanding
    of the standards?
  • What do I need to add to my current instruction?

23
Determining Text Complexity of Individual Texts
24
Text Complexity Considerations
  • Significant Instructional Shifts in CCSS for ELA
  • Consistent emphasis on increasingly complex texts
    throughout the grades to prepare students for
    success in college and career
  • Students need to develop the ability and the
    stamina to read complex texts independently and
    proficiently in all disciplines.
  • Integration of Literacy across the Content Areas
  • Educators have a shared responsibility for
    literacy instruction, regardless of discipline or
    content area.

(Handout 3)
Developed by EngageNY
25
Staircase of Complexity
  • To prepare students for the complexity of college
    and career ready-style texts, each grade level
    requires a step of growth on the staircase.
  • Students read the grade-appropriate text around
    which instruction is centered.
  • Teachers are patient and create more time and
    space for close, careful reading.
  • Teachers provide appropriate scaffolding and
    supports to meet students instructional needs
    and reading levels.

Developed by EngageNY
26
Advancing Our Students Language and Literacy
(2010) by Marilyn Jager Adams
  • Key Points
  • The literacy level of our secondary students is
    languishing because the kids are not reading what
    they need to be reading. (p. 3)
  • SAT scores decline as well as the difficulty of
    reading materials.
  • Textbooks became progressively easier as societal
    reading materials remained constant (newspapers)
    or increased difficulty levels.
  • Average length of sentences in books published
    between 1963 and 1991 was shorter than that of
    books published between 1946 and 1962.
  • In the seventh- and eighth-grade textbooks, ,
    the mean length of sentences had decreased from
    20 words to 14 words the equivalent of
    dropping one or two clauses from every sentence
    -- Hayes, Wolfer, and Wolfe (1996)
  • words are not just words. They are the
    nexusthe interfacebetween knowledge and thought
    ... It is through words that we build, refine,
    and modify our knowledge. What makes vocabulary
    valuable and important is not the words
    themselves so much as the understandings they
    afford. (p. 8)
  • Although the relaxation of school book complexity
    may be the consequence of our earnest efforts to
    ensure full curricular access to all, it is a
    solution with serious problems of its own. In
    terms of literacy growth, it is a solution that
    is self-propagating and self-defeating, for it
    is a solution that denies the student the very
    language, information, and modes of thought that
    they need most in order to move up and on.
  • a great benefit of common core curriculum is
    that it would drive a thorough overhaul of the
    texts we give students to read, and the kinds of
    learning and thought we expect their reading to
    support. (p. 11)

(Handout 4)
Adams, M. J. (2011). Advancing our students
Language and Literacy The challenge of complex
texts. American Educator, 34(4), 3-11.
27
CCSS and Text Complexity
  • The Common Core Standards hinge on students
    encountering appropriately complex texts at each
    grade level in order to develop the mature
    language skills and the conceptual knowledge they
    need for success in school and life (p. 3).

Taken from Coleman, D. Pimentel, S. (2011).
Publishers Criteria for the Common Core State
Standards in English Language Arts and Literacy
Grades 312. Retrieved from http//www.corestandar
ds.org/assets/Publishers_Criteria_for_3-12.pdf
28
Why Text Complexity Matters
  • Over the past 50 years, the complexity of college
    and workplace reading has increased, while text
    complexity in K-12 has remained stagnant
  • Research indicates that the demands that college,
    career, and citizenship place on readers has
    either held steady or increased over the last
    fifty years.
  • The difficulty of college textbooks has increased
    since 1962.
  • Students in college are expected to read complex
    texts with substantially greater independence
    than are students in typical K-12 programs.
  • Workplace reading, measured in Lexiles, exceeds
    grade 12 text complexity significantly, although
    there is considerable variation.

Taken from CCSS, Appendix A, p. 2
29
Combined Lexile Charts
  • Based upon a 2009 national study by MetaMetrics
    reported in The Lexile Framework for Reading

30
Lexile Level of Sample Reading Materials
  • Based upon a 2009 national study by MetaMetrics
    reported in The Lexile Framework for Reading

31
The Common Core and Text Complexity
  • College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard for
    Reading 10
  • Read and comprehend complex literary and
    informational texts independently and
    proficiently.
  • Grade-level Standard Examples
  • RI.9.10
  • By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend
    literary nonfiction in the grades 910 text
    complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
    needed at the high end of the range.
  • RI.10.10
  • By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend
    literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades
    910 text complexity band independently and
    proficiently.
  • RI.11.10
  • By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend
    literary nonfiction in the grades 11CCR text
    complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
    needed at the high end of the range.
  • RI.12.10
  • By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend
    literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades
    11CCR text complexity band independently and
    proficiently.

(Handout 5)
Taken from CCSS, pg. 40
32
The Common Core and Text Complexity
  • The Common Core Standards for Reading address the
    intertwined issues of what and how students read
    through
  • Increasing sophistication in students reading
    comprehension ability
  • Increasing text complexity in successive school
    years
  • A three-part model for determining the difficulty
    of a particular text

Taken from CCSS, Appendix A, p. 4
33
Common Core and Text Types
  • Narrative
  • Short stories
  • Novels
  • Poetry
  • Drama
  • Informational Text and Literary Non-fiction
  • Historical non-fiction
  • Biographies
  • Auto-biographies
  • Speeches
  • Historical documents
  • Technical documents

Taken from CCSS, p. 57
34
Text complexity is defined by
  • Quantitative Measures
  • Readability and other scores of text complexity
    are often best measured by computer software
    (word length, word frequency, sentence length,
    text cohesion).
  • Qualitative Dimensions
  • Levels of meaning or purpose, structure, language
    conventionality and clarity, and knowledge
    demands are often best measured by an attentive
    human reader.
  • Reader and Task Considerations
  • Background knowledge of reader, motivation,
    interests, and complexity generated by tasks
    assigned are often best measured by educators
    employing their professional judgment.

Taken from CCSS, Appendix A, pp. 4-9
35
Where do we find texts in the appropriate text
complexity band?
We could . . . Choose an excerpt of text from
Appendix B. . . . or. . . Use available
resources to determine the text complexity of
other materials on our own.
36
Determining Text Complexity
  • A Four-step Process
  • Determine the quantitative measures of the
    text.
  • Analyze the qualitative measures of the text.
  • Reflect upon the reader and task considerations.
  • Recommend placement.

37
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • Traditionally measured by
  • Word Length, Frequency, and Difficulty
  • Sentence Length
  • Text Length
  • Text Cohesion

38
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • Ranges for Text Complexity
  • The chart outlines the suggested ranges for each
    of the text complexity bands.

The K-2 suggested Lexile range was not
identified by the CCSS and was added by
Kansas. Taken from Accelerated Reader and the
CCSS, available at the following URL
http//doc.renlearn.com/KMNet/Roo4572117GCK46B.pd
f
Taken from www.ksde.org
39
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • What is the quantitative measure of the text
    complexity triangle using the Lexile system for
    Harper Lees 1960 novel To Kill A Mockingbird?

40
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • Finding a Lexile Measure for Text
    http//www.lexile.com/findabook/

41
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • For texts not in the Lexile database, consider
    using the Lexile Analyzer http//www.lexile.com/a
    nalyzer/
  • Registration is required (free)
    http//www.lexile.com/account/register/
  • Allows user to receive an estimated Lexile
    score
  • Accommodates texts up to 1000 words in length

42
Step 1 Quantitative Measures
  • Remember - the quantitative measures section is
    the first of three components of the text
    complexity triangle.
  • The final recommendation may be validated,
    influenced, or even over-ruled by the examination
    of qualitative measures and the reader and task
    considerations.

43
Step 2 Qualitative Dimensions
  • Measures such as
  • Levels of Meaning and Purpose
  • Text and Sentence Structure
  • Language Conventionality and Clarity
  • Organization
  • Prior Knowledge Demands

44
Step 2 Qualitative Dimensions
  • The Qualitative Measures Rubrics for Literary and
    Informational Texts are below.
  • The rubric for literary texts and the rubric for
    informational texts allow educators to evaluate
    the important elements of text that are often
    missed by computer software that tends to focus
    on more easily measured factors.
  • These factors represent continua rather than
    discrete stages or levels. Numeric values are not
    associated with these rubrics. The four points
    along the continuum are high, middle high,
    middle low, and low.

(Handouts 6 and 7)
45
Step 2 Qualitative Dimensions
  • So
  • How is the rubric used?
  • And how would To Kill a Mockingbird fare when
    analyzed through the lens of the Literary Texts
    Rubric?

(Handout 6)
46
Step 2 Qualitative Dimensions
(Handout 7)
47
ReviewSteps 1 and 2
  • From examining the quantitative measures, we
    knew

Lexile Text Measure 870L
But after reflecting upon the qualitative
measures, we believed
48
ReviewSteps 1 and 2
  • Quantitative Measures and Qualitative Dimensions
    are BOTH useful and imperfect.
  • Quantitative measures place most texts in a
    complexity band reliably. However, quantitative
    measures are less reliable for certain kinds of
    texts, such as poetry and drama.
  • Qualitative dimensions are on a continuum (not
    grade/band specific) and are most useful in
    conjunction with quantitative measures.

49
Work Session 3a Analyze a Text to Determine
Text Complexity
Quantitative Measures and Qualitative Dimensions
  • Locate Work Session 3a, page 3 of 5.
  • Directions
  • Participants will analyze the qualitative
    measures using The Qualitative Measures Rubric
    for Literary Texts for I Know Why the Caged Bird
    Sings.

Recommended Placement
Bird Image from http//www.askdesign.biz/blog/2011
/12/2011-poem-design-winners/
50
Work Session 3aAnalyze a Text to Determine Text
Complexity
Quantitative Measures and Qualitative Dimensions
51
Step 3Reader and Task Considerations
  • Step 3 Reader and Task Considerations such as
  • Knowledge and Cognitive Demands
  • Life experiences
  • Cultural and literary knowledge
  • Content and discipline knowledge
  • Mode(s) of Response
  • Written
  • Oral
  • Graphic
  • Purpose for Reading
  • Degree of Scaffolding

52
Step 3 Reader and Task Considerations
  • Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader
    and Task Considerations have been developed.
  • The questions provided in this resource are meant
    to spur teacher thought and reflection upon the
    text, reflection upon the students, and any tasks
    associated with the text.
  • The questions included here are largely
    open-ended questions without single, correct
    answers but help educators to think through the
    implications of using a particular text in the
    classroom.

53
Work Session 3b Analyze a Text to Determine
Text Complexity
Reader and Task Considerations
  • Locate Work Session 3b, page 4 of 5.
  • Directions
  • Participants will complete the Text Complexity
    Analysis Sheet by reflecting on the Reader and
    Task Considerations document for I Know Why the
    Caged Bird Sings.

Recommended Placement
Bird Image from http//www.askdesign.biz/blog/2011
/12/2011-poem-design-winners/
54
Step 4 Recommend Placement
  • After the examination of the Reader and Task
    Considerations, the third section of the text
    complexity model is complete.
  • Now, a recommendation for final placement within
    a text complexity band can be made.

55
Step 4 Recommend Placement
  • Based upon all the informationall three sections
    of the modelthe final recommendation for To Kill
    a Mockingbird is.

56
Step 4 Recommend Placement
  • In this instance, Appendix B confirms the
    evaluation of the novel. To Kill a Mockingbird
    is placed within the grade 9-10 text complexity
    band.

57
Step 4 Recommend Placement
  • The one-page template provides an opportunity to
    record the thinking involved in recommending the
    placement of a specific text into a text
    complexity band.
  •  
  • Keeping a record of such analysis and thinking
    might be useful documentation in the case that
    any questions arise in the future.

58
Text Analysis Sample
  • Example Text Analysis Summary Sheet from Kansas
    State Department of Education

59
Work Session 3cAnalyze a Text to Determine
Text Complexity
Recommended Placement
  • Locate Work Session 3c, page 5 of 5.
  • Directions
  • Participants will complete the recommendation
    section on the Text Analysis document for I
    Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

Recommended Placement
Bird Image from http//www.askdesign.biz/blog/2011
/12/2011-poem-design-winners/
60
Text Complexity Analysis
2
Lexile Score 1070 ATOS 5.5
1
4
3
61
Text Analysis of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
(Handout 8)
62
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers (PARCC)
  • Model Content Frameworks for ELA/Literacy

63
PARCC Model Content Frameworks for ELA
  • Purpose
  • Support implementation of the CCSS
  • Inform development of item specifications and
    blueprints for PARCC assessments
  • Intention
  • Dynamic
  • Responsive to evidence and input from educators

Taken from PARCC, p. 3
64
PARCC Model Content Frameworks for ELA
  • Designed to measure knowledge, skills, and
    understanding essential to achieving college and
    career readiness.
  • ELA/Literacy Areas
  • Reading complex texts
  • Writing effectively
  • Conducting and reporting on research
  • Speaking and listening
  • Using language for reading, writing, and speaking

Taken from PARCC, pp. 3-4
65
Structure of the PARCC Model Content Frameworks
for ELA
  • Narrative Summary of the ELA Standards
  • Model Content Framework Chart
  • Key Terms and Concepts for the Model Content
    Framework Chart
  • Writing and Speaking and Listening Standards
    Progression Charts

Taken from PARCC, p. 4
66
Section 1 Narrative Summary
Taken from PARCC, p. 86
67
Section 2 ELA Model Content Framework Chart
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
68
Section 3 Key Terms and Concepts for the Model
Content Framework Chart
  • Key elements as seen in the CCSS
  • To be addressed in the PARCC assessment
  • Defined within each grade level and specific to
    the grade level

Taken from PARCC, pp. 6-10 and 87
69
Reading Complex Texts
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
70
Reading Complex Texts
  • What are complex texts?
  • Focus on close, sustained analysis
  • Synthesis of ideas and making connections across
    texts
  • Extended and short texts must be appropriately
    complex at the grade-band-level
  • Various textspoems, short stories, magazine
    articles, political documents, classic works,
    website pages, new media texts
  • Access to wide range of materials and genres for
    independent reading (develop knowledge and
    promote reading for pleasure)

Taken from PARCC, pp. 6-7
71
Writing About Texts
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
72
Writing About Texts
  • Emphasis on writing arguments or informational
    pieces with a focus on analyzing sources (texts
    or media)
  • Routine writingcritical for reading
    comprehension and developing writing skills
  • Formal, structured analytic writingadvances an
    argument or explains an idea based on
    text-dependent questions
  • Timed writing and writing projects over multiple
    days or weeks

Taken from PARCC, pp. 7-8
73
Research Project
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
74
Research Project
  • Seeks to build connections between texts where
    students integrate knowledge
  • Develops expertise on various topics
  • Requires students to read closely and synthesize
    information from multiple texts
  • Requires students to present findings using
    formal and informal methods (oral presentations,
    compositions, multimedia products)

Taken from PARCC, p. 8
75
Narrative Writing
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
76
Narrative Writing
  • In K-5, 35 of writing is narrative.
  • Decreases gradually to 20 in high school.
  • Reinforces other learning.
  • Provides additional opportunities to reflect on
    or emulate what is read.

Taken from PARCC, pp. 8-9
77
For Reading and Writing in Each Module
Taken from PARCC, p. 87
78
For Reading and Writing in Each Module
  • Explanation of the knowledge and skills that may
    be integrated with all standards
  • Critical role of building content knowledge in
  • Citing evidence and analyzing content
  • Understanding and applying grammar
  • Understanding and applying vocabulary
  • Conducting discussions and reporting findings

Taken from PARCC, pp. 9-10
79
Writing and Speaking and Listening Standards
Progression Charts
  • Traces changes to standards between the previous
    grade and the current grade
  • Highlights the shifts in a single standard

Taken from PARCC, p. 91
80
Work Session 4 Jigsaw
  • Locate the PARCC Model Content Framework for
    ELA/Literacy For Grade 11.
  • Choose a group member to fulfill the following
    roles.
  • Group Leadermanages group
  • Recorderrecords Most Valuable Point (MVP) on
    chart paper
  • Reporterpresents the information to the entire
    group
  • Time Managerkeeps group on task and monitors
    time
  • Each person serves as a member as seen below to
    read a section/sections of the PARCC Model
    Content Frameworks.
  • Member 1Narrative Summary of ELA Standards for
    Grade 11 and Literacy Standards for Other
    Disciplines in Grade 11
  • Member 2Reading Complex Texts
  • Member 3Writing About Texts and Research Project
  • Member 4Narrative Writing and For Reading and
    Writing in Each Module
  • Noteif more than 4 members at a table, then
    assign each section to partners.
  •  

81
Work Session 4 Jigsaw
  • Group Members read and present
  • Each member silently reads assigned section and
    completes the Essential Details component of
    the Think Sheet for assigned section, page 2 of
    2.
  • Once sections are read, each member presents to
    the group the essential details from the Think
    Sheet.
  • Discuss ideas on Think Sheet
  • Group discusses key or big ideas from the
    Essential Details on Think Sheet from assigned
    sections.
  • Group determines the MVP and recorder writes the
    MVP on the large chart paper.
  • Time Manager displays MVP on wall.

82
Work Session 4 Jigsaw
  • Reporter in each group will describe the MVP to
    the entire group.

83
Integrating the CCSS and PARCC Model Content
Frameworks (MCF)
  • Unit Planning

84
Utilizing the PARCC MCF for Unit Planning
Refer to p. 67
85
Module A
Refer to p. 67
86
Compare and Contrast Modules A and B
(Handout 9)
Refer to p. 67
87
10th Grade Argument Writing Sample
Taken from CCSS Appendix C, p. 68
(Handout 10)
88
Did the students writing sample show mastery of
9-10 Writing Standard 2 and Sub-standards a-f?
  • W.9-10.2. - Write informative/explanatory texts
    to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts,
    and information clearly and accurately through
    the effective selection, organization, and
    analysis of content.
  • a. Introduce a topic organize complex ideas,
    concepts, and information to make important
    connections and distinctions include formatting,
    graphics, and multimedia when useful to aiding
    comprehension.
  • b. Develop the topic with well-chosen,
    relevant, and sufficient facts, extended
    definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
    other information and examples appropriate to the
    audiences knowledge of the topic.
  • c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to
    link the major sections of the text, create
    cohesion, and clarify the relationships among
    complex ideas and concepts.
  • d. Use precise language and domain-specific
    vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
  • e. Establish and maintain a formal style and
    objective tone while attending to the norms and
    conventions of the discipline in which they are
    writing.
  • f. Provide a concluding statement or section
    that follows from and supports the information or
    explanation presented.

(Handout 11)
Taken from CCSS for ELA, p. 45
89
Focus Standards for Ninth Grade Unit Plan
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9.
(Handout 12)
90
Sample Unit of Study Grade 9, Module
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
(Handout 13)
91
Complex Text 1 Speech (Informational Text)
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
(Handout 14)
92
Complex Text 2 Novel (Literary Text)
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
(Handout 15)
93
Complex Text 3 Letter (Informational Text)
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
(Handout 16)
94
Complex Text 4 Poem (Literary Text)
(Handout 17)
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
95
Research Project Example
Select an author from our unit of study and
conduct further research about this individual.
Begin by defining a research question related to
the literal and figurative power this person
possessed and refine it as necessary. The
research should include an autobiographical or
biographical text, another story, speech, or poem
by the author, and at least two other references
to the author and his or her work. Ultimately,
you should be able to critically analyze not only
the power of this individuals words, but the
impact this individual had on society. Be
prepared to share your findings with your
classroom in a ten-minute presentation.
  • This research project provides students the
    opportunity to demonstrate the following
    standards W.9.7 SL.9.4 and RI.9.3.

(Handout 18)
Adapted from Common Core Curriculum Maps for
English Language Arts for Grade 9. These can be
accessed at http//commoncore.org/maps/unit/grade_
9
96
Shifts in Planning According to PARCC Model
Content Framework
  • How will the demands of this unit of study
    structure affect the time allocated for reading
    texts?
  • What must happen in classrooms to plan for the
    shift from literary texts to informational texts?
  • What will need to happen to incorporate all of
    the writing tasks necessary in this new
    structure?
  • How will language standards be integrated into
    the unit of study structure?

97
Close Reading Analytical Thinking
98
Slowing Down
  • Teachers can enhance students pleasure and
    success in reading by showing them how to slow
    down and savor what they read.
  • - T. Newkirk

Taken from ASCD Educational Leadership, March
2010, Volume 67, Number 6, pages 6-11
99
What is close reading?
  • Reading closely means developing a deep
    understanding and a precise interpretation of a
    literary passage.
  • When reading closely, a reader does not stop at
    the literal meaning of the words on a page, but
    embraces larger themes and ideas evoked or
    implied by the passage itself.
  • Close reading involves reading and rereading
    deliberately to examine meaning, as well as
    careful gathering of observations from the
    smallest linguistic matters to larger issues of
    overall understanding and judgment.

Taken from Indianas Transition to the CCSS
Document, Series One, Page 2.
100
What is close reading? (cont.)
  • The Common Core State Standards for ELA strongly
    focus on students gathering evidence, knowledge,
    and insight from what they read.
  • 80 to 90 of the Reading Standards in each grade
    require text dependent analysis.

Taken from AchievetheCore.orgs Guide to Creating
Text Dependent Questions for Close Analytic
Reading, which can be accessed at this website
http//www.achievethecore.org/steal-these-tools/te
xt-dependent-questions
101
Text Dependent Questions Ask Students To
  • Analyze paragraphs on a sentence by sentence
    basis and word by word basis to determine literal
    and figurative meaning
  • Investigate how meaning can be altered by
    changing key words and why an author may have
    chosen one word over another
  • Probe each argument in persuasive text, each idea
    in informational text, each key detail in
    literary text, and observe how these build to a
    whole
  • Examine how shifts in the direction of an
    argument or explanation are achieved and the
    impact of those shifts
  • Question why authors choose to end and begin when
    they do
  • Note and assess patterns of writing
  • Consider what the text leaves uncertain or
    unstated

(Handout 19)
Taken from Achieve the Core Guide which can be
accessed at this website http//www.achievetheco
re.org/steal-these-tools/text-dependent-questions
102
Examples of Text Dependent Questions for the
Gettysburg Address
  • How does Lincoln establish what is at stake in
    this war in the first two sentences of the
    Gettysburg Address?
  • What is the unfinished work that those listening
    to the speech are asked to achieve? With this in
    mind, how does Lincoln use the idea of
    unfinished work to assign responsibility to his
    listeners?
  • How does the meaning of dedicate change over
    the course of the text, and what does this reveal
    about the Gettysburg Address?

Taken from David Colemans Common Core Unit for
High School English/Social Studies
http//www.achievethecore.org/steal-these-tools/cl
ose-reading-exemplars
103
Example of Non-text Dependent Questions
  • Why did the North fight the Civil War?
  • Have you ever been to a funeral or a gravesite?
  • Lincoln says that the nation is dedicated to the
    proposition that all men are created equal. Why
    is equality an important value to promote?

If the question can be answered without reading
the text, it is not a text dependent question.
Taken from AchievetheCore.orgs Guide to Creating
Text Dependent Questions for Close Analytic
Reading, which can be accessed at this website
http//www.achievethecore.org/steal-these-tools/te
xt-dependent-questions
104
VIDEO
(Handouts 20 and 21)
105
Work Session 5 Planning for an Individual Text
Within a Unit
  • Locate Work Session 5
  • Directions
  • Using the Writing and Speaking and Listening
    Standards listed on the sheet and the text,
    Letter from Birmingham Jail, create a writing
    task or tasks and a speaking and listening task
    or tasks that would provide students an
    opportunity to demonstrate the selected
    standards.

106
Websites and Contact Information
  • Common Core Website
  • www.corestandards.org
  • MDE website PARCC
    Website
  • www.mde.k12.ms.us (Hot Topics)
    www.PARCConline.org
  • Mississippi Department of Education
  • Office of Curriculum and Instruction
  • Vincent Segalini
  • Office Director-English/Language Arts
  • vsegalini_at_mde.k12.ms.us
  • (601)359-2586
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