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Disaster Recovery versus Continuity of Operations

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Disaster Recovery versus Continuity of Operations Disaster recovery is the process by which you resume business in the short term after a disruptive event. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Disaster Recovery versus Continuity of Operations


1
Disaster Recovery versus Continuity of Operations
  • Disaster recovery is the process by which you
    resume business in the short term after a
    disruptive event.
  • "Business continuity planning" is a more
    comprehensive approach to making sure the
    organization continues to keep operating and
    making money.
  • Disaster recovery could be considered a sub-part
    of continuity of operations.
  • Both apply across a range from an earthquake to a
    computer virus attack.

2
Business continuity actions
  • Mitigation Something done to reduce the
    likelihood of occurrence and the severity of the
    loss
  • Avoidance Actions taken to eliminate the event
    from occurring
  • Transference Shift the risk to a third party

3
Federal Government Continuity of Operations Plan
(COOP)
  • FPC-65 describes the planning considerations and
    requirements for COOP plans.
  • FPC-65 requires that all Federal Executive Branch
    agencies must
  • Be capable of implementing their COOP plans with
    and without warning.
  • Be operational not later than 12 hours after
    activation.
  • Be capable of maintaining sustained operations
    for up to 30 days.
  • Include regularly scheduled testing, training,
    and exercising of personnel, equipment, systems,
    processes, and procedures used to support the
    agency during a COOP event.
  • Provide for a regular risk analysis of current
    alternate operating facilities.
  • Locate alternate facilities in areas where the
    ability to initiate, maintain, and terminate COOP
    is optimal.
  • Take advantage of existing agency field
    infrastructures and give consideration to other
    options, such as telecommuting, work-at-home, and
    shared facilities.

4
Business Continuity Plans
  • Plans that enable your company to operate at
    possibly reduced levels during and immediately
    following a disaster.

5
Steps in Planning
  • To build a disaster recovery plan, the following
    steps should be taken
  • Identify critical assets
  • Identify risks to the assets
  • Determine the likelihood of the threat and reduce
    it
  • Steps to minimize damage
  • Response actions

6
Contingency Plan Coordination
  • Designated person to coordinate the contingency
    plan
  • Adequate knowledge and knowledge to implement the
    plan
  • Select a team to develop and implement the plan
  • Finance
  • Legal
  • Safety
  • Production
  • Administration

7
Business Impact Analysis
  • A business impact analysis (BIA) is the first
    step in developing a BCP. It should include
  • Identification of the potential impact of
    uncontrolled, non-specific events on the
    institution's business processes and its
    customers
  • Consideration of all departments and business
    functions, not just data processing and
  • Estimation of maximum allowable downtime and
    acceptable levels of data, operations, and
    financial losses.

8
Business Impact Analysis
  • As part of a disaster recovery plan, BIA is
    likely to identify costs linked to failures, such
    as loss of cash flow, replacement of equipment,
    salaries paid to catch up with a backlog of work,
    loss of profits, and so on.
  • A BIA report quantifies the importance of
    business components and suggests appropriate fund
    allocation for measures to protect them.
  • The possibilities of failures are likely to be
    assessed in terms of their impacts on safety,
    finances, marketing, legal compliance, and
    quality assurance.

9
Risk Assessment
  • Combined likelihood and severity of the event
  • Tangible losses
  • Costs that can be readily quantified
  • Lost productivity
  • Lost income
  • Extra expenses
  • Property damage
  • Intangible losses
  • Costs related to the event but hard to quantify
  • Lost business opportunities
  • Damaged reputation

10
Examples of Risk Assessments
  • Tornadoes
  • Earthquakes
  • Thunderstorms
  • Snows
  • Extreme thunderstorms
  • Hurricanes
  • Floods

11
Potential Manmade Risks
  • Maps of hazardous materials routes
  • Locations of hazardous facilities
  • Pipelines
  • Railroads
  • Dams
  • Rivers

12
Facility Risks
  • Electricity
  • Telephones
  • Water
  • Climate control
  • Data networks
  • Structural

13
Security Risks
  • Workplace violence
  • Bomb threats
  • Physical security of property
  • Sabotage
  • Intellectual property thefts

14
Medical Threats
  • Illness
  • Deaths
  • Serious accidents

15
Factors that can Affect Risks
  • Time of day
  • Day of the week
  • Location

16
COOP Elements
  • Elements that make a COOP plan viable, include
  • Essential functions.
  • Delegations of authority.
  • Succession planning.
  • Alternate facilities.
  • Interoperable communications.
  • Vital records and databases.
  • Human capital.
  • Testing, training, and exercise program.
  • Plans for devolution and reconstitution.

17
COOP Plans
  • COOP planning objectives include
  • Ensuring continued performance of essential
    functions.
  • Reducing loss of life and minimizing damage.
  • Ensuring succession to office of key leaders.
  • Reducing or mitigating disruptions to operations.
  • Protecting essential assets.
  • Achieving a timely recovery and reconstitution.
  • Maintaining a test, training, and exercise
    program for program validation.

18
FEMAs COOP Elements
  • Elements that make a COOP plan viable, include
  • Essential functions
  • Delegations of authority
  • Succession planning
  • Alternate facilities, communication systems
  • Vital records and databases
  • A test, training, and exercise program
  • Plans for devolution and reconstitution

19
Essential Functions
  • Essential functions are those functions that
    allow the organization to provide vital services
  • Essential functions are those functions which
    must continue to be provided without interruption

20
Delegations of Authority
  • Delegations should be predetermined and
    documented in writing. They should state
    explicitly
  • What authorities are delegated.
  • To whom.
  • Exceptions to the successors authority to
    redelegate.
  • Limitations on the delegated authority.

21
Succession Planning
  • Order of Succession provides an orderly
    transition of power in the event of an emergency
  • Orders of succession should be established
    management, supervisors, etc. who are responsible
    for performing essential functions

22
Alternate Facilities, Communications
  • In the event of a disaster, arrangements for
    alternate facilities should be identified
    beforehand
  • Arrangements should be made ahead of time to
    ensure communication systems can be brought back
    up and operational with limited interruptions

23
Vital Records
  • In the event of a disaster, loss of data and loss
    of records may occur
  • Provisions and procedures should be made in
    advance to ensure back up copies are made and
    available
  • Examples of these records include legal records,
    financial records, etc.

24
Tests
  • From a COOP perspective, tests are an excellent
    way to evaluate functions such as
  • Communications connectivities.
  • Alert and notification procedures.
  • Deployment procedures.

25
Training
  • Training is instruction in core competencies and
    skills and is the principal means by which
    individuals achieve a level of proficiency
  • Provides the tools needed to accomplish a goal,
    meet program requirements, or acquire a specified
    capability.
  • Training encompasses a range of activities, each
    intended to provide information and refine skills.

26
Exercises
  • Exercises are events that allow participants to
    apply their skills and knowledge to improve
    operational readiness.
  • Exercises also allow planners to evaluate the
    effectiveness of previously conducted tests
    and training activities.

27
Devolution
  • Devolution is the capability to transfer
    statutory authority and responsibility for
    essential functions from an agencys primary
    operating staff and facilities to other employees
    and facilities.

28
Reconstitution
  • Reconstitution is the process by which agency
    personnel resume normal agency operations from
    the original or a replacement primary operating
    facility.
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