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EGR 2

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: Destiny Williams Last modified by: eleal Created Date: 3/6/2013 2:14:01 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: EGR 2


1

EGR 2
2
WorkOne Offers the following services
  • Staffing Assistance
  • Labor Market Information
  • Re-Entry Services
  • Veteran Services
  • Youth Programs JAG
  • Unemployment Insurance Assistance

3
WorkOne Business Services Division
  • Whether filling one position or expanding a
    workforce, WorkOne can provide access to
    thousands of job seekers and FREE job postings on
    Indianacareerconnect.com.
  • We also offer
  • Candidate Screening
  • Job Fairs
  • Plus on-site facilities for
  • Recruitment
  • Training
  • Testing

4
WorkOne
  • Candidate Pool
  • Professional Networking Groups
  • Recent College Graduates
  • Occupational Certification Graduates
  • Skills Enhancement Graduates

5
Ex-Offender Re-Entry Program
  • Participants will have available
  • One on One Job Placement Assistance
  • Job Readiness Workshops
  • Bonding Information
  • Mentoring post employment

6
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7
Award Winning JAG Team
  • Working with At Risk Youth,
  • Providing structure, direction
  • and support
  • Sweeping the Regional and
  • State-Wide competitions
  • Works with both
  • in and out of school youth.
  • Internship opportunities to
  • gain work experience

8
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9
  • 2014 Assessment/Forecast

10
  • The assessment/forecast for 2014 came as a result
    of conversations between the WorkOne Business
    Consultants, Chambers, Economic Developers, and
    employers of our region. There have also been
    many conversations between the WorkOne Business
    Consultants and local post-secondary
    institutions.

11
  • The discussions began as we noticed a slow-down
    in job placements, job orders being listed, and
    more and more conversation going on around us
    about the lack of skilled employees.
  • As the state and nation sit on the precipice of
    another economic down-turn, how is WorkOne as a
    region preparing for the down-turn and how are we
    working to position our potential employee
    customers for the new employment requirements as
    they come forth?

12
  • How are we truly evaluating the needs of our
    employers and working to create viable solutions
    to meet those needs?

13
FOUR YEAR WINDOW APPEARS TO BE STRONG
  • 2,600 projected new jobs in the next four years
  • 31 approved projects (23 in Elkhart County)
  • 8 projects awaiting approval (number of new jobs
    undetermined)
  • Businesses appear to have money to invest

14
2013 GROWTH TO BE SLOW TO MODERATE
  • Businesses express pessimism concerning the
    economic growth over the next 12 months
  • Business are in a precautionary (wait and see)
    mode
  • There is currently a lack of acceptable existing
    commercial property (buildings) available for
    expansion and or development

15
2013 GROWTH TO BE SLOW TO MODERATE (continued)
  • Workforce skill gaps continue
  • Unemployment is projected to remain above 7
    percent
  • Inflation rate is projected to remain around 2
    percent

16
THE PROBLEM
  • Powerful forces jarring the labor market
  • Sudden and rapid job growth, hiring needs and
    skill set needs after two to three years of
    stagnate and/or decreasing job growth
  • Finding qualified employees
  • Ongoing rapid infusion of technology

17
THE PROBLEM (Continued)
  • Decline of vocational training in the Regions
    educational system
  • Three fourths of educators believe their
    graduates are ready for the job market
  • Employers do not feel that the majority of people
    applying for their positions are job ready

18
THE PROBLEM (Continued)
  • Decline, and in many cases, elimination of
    company sponsored training and developmental
    programs
  • Businesses that create the bulk of new jobs are
    unable or unwilling to spend the money to train
    new hires on their equipment or processes
  • Absence of work ethic continues to drive
    employers to the use of temporary agencies to
    screen potential employees

19
THE PROBLEM (Continued)
  • Ongoing mass exodus of a generation of skilled
    baby boomers headed for retirement, leaving
    employers with not only a skill gap, but more
    importantly, a work ethic gap

20
THE PROBLEM (Continued)
  • Employers are unwilling to pay higher wages to
    compete for better skills
  • Many companies have lowered the wages provided
    for the same job or for a job with higher output
    expectations since the economic downturn.
  • This leads employees to continue to job search
    for a job
  • paying a few cents more per hour, resulting in a
    lack of
  • company loyalty.

21
THE PROBLEM (Continued)
  • Many employers, educators, guidance/career
    counselors do not know or understand the wants,
    needs and or the aspirations of the Millennials
    (26 years of age or younger) nor do they
    understand what motivates them
  • Millennials are driven by quality of life versus
    quantity of money earned
  • Millennials are driven to give and work in
    charity organizations they need to see a bigger
    picture for employment opportunities that exist
    for them is it a job or are they making a
    difference.
  •  

22
GLOBAL AND DOMESTIC CONCERNS
  • India, Brazil and China Growth deceleration
  • Europe Recession (Euro crisis)
  • Japan The most indebted country in the world
  • Domestic Fiscal Cliff /Sequestration
  • Possible return to recession
  • Budget deficit
  • Taxation
  • State direction (New Administration)
  • Education ( lack of vocational training)

23
WORKFORCE SKILL GAPS
  • Inability to pass drug testing
  • Inability to pass background checks
  • Reading comprehension is much lower
  • Math skills missing (measuring)

24
WORKFORCE SKILL GAPS (continued)
  • Team work (working and playing well together)
  • If not appreciated or if denigrated for not being
    up to par, individuals will not participate in
    a team setting
  • Less prone to follow instructions
  • Lack of social skills
  • Difficult to maintain interest in the job once
    they are hired

25
WORKFORCE SKILL GAPS (continued)
  • Poor attendance
  • Unwillingness to work weekends or Holidays
  • Poor attitudes
  • Unwillingness to work second, third or swing
    shifts. Unwillingness or inability to work part
    time

26
WORKFORCE SKILL GAPS (continued)
  • Specific to Manufacturing Welders, Machine
    Operators, Machine Mechanics, Machine Trouble
    shooters, Metal Fabricators, Sewers, Cabinet
    Makers, Woodworkers
  • Specific to Transportation Vehicle Mechanics,
    OTR Truck Drivers (Class A and B CDL)
  • Specific to Healthcare Support Workers, CNA
  • In general, Laborers and Assemblers

27
UNEMPLOYMENT AVERAGES
2012 Averages 2011 Averages
State 8 (92 Counties) 8.7 (92 Counties)
St. Joseph 9.1 10
Elkhart 8.8 11.1
Marshall 8.3 9.7
Fulton 8.1 9.1
Kosciusko 7.0 8.2
28
JOB ORDERS, OPENINGS, REFERRALS 7/1/2012
3/6/2013
COUNTIES ORDERS OPENINGS REFERRALS
St. Joseph 2,018 4,665 36,512
Elkhart 1,058 5,967 29,680
Kosciusko 815 2,383 9,513
Marshall 199 437 3,412
Fulton 34 50 625
When you see high numbers of referrals to the job
openings, please understand that not all of these
are referrals coming from with the WorkOne
offices. Many of these are individuals
self-referring themselves to positions. Many
times individuals refer themselves to jobs for
which they are not qualified in order to satisfy
the unemployment requirement of applying for
jobs. Often, they are not interested in the job
and they refer themselves multiple times for the
same position. As we continue to work with more
individuals through the Emergency Unemployment
Compensation Re-Employment Assistance (EUCREA)
program, we are able to better assist them in
appropriate referrals to jobs for which they are
qualified.
29
EGR2 HOOSIER HOT 50 JOBS
      2009 2008 2018 2018 2018 2018
Rank Code Occupational Title Wage Employment Projection Growth Change Openings
1 47-2061 Construction Laborers 38,820 1,314 1,625 311 24 399
2 29-1111 Registered Nurses 55,534 5,100 6,327 1,227 24 2,118
3 29-2061 Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses 38,311 1,522 1,869 347 23 823
4 17-2112 Industrial Engineers 65,822 891 1,089 198 22 426
5 15-1081 Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts 54,967 417 588 171 41 246
6 13-1111 Management Analysts 96,788 336 462 126 38 184
7 53-3032 Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer 42,531 4,494 4,925 431 10 1,235
8 15-1030 Computer Software Engineers 62,185 424 618 194 46 230
9 29-1060 Physicians and Surgeons 166,400 937 1,188 251 27 414
10 25-1000 Postsecondary Teachers 69,945 2,842 3,313 471 17 965
11 41-4000 Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing 61,045 5,654 5,778 124 2 1,433
12 49-9021 Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers 43,044 418 544 126 30 193
30
EGR2 HOOSIER HOT 50 JOBS
    2009 2008 2018 2018 2018 2018
Code Occupational Title Wage Employment Projection Growth Change Openings
13 49-9042 Maintenance and Repair Workers, General 36,233 3,734 3,990 256 7
14 13-2011 Accountants and Auditors 61,958 1,716 2,022 306 18
15 13-1070 Human Resources, Training, and Labor Relations Specialists 43,788 1,224 1,481 257 21
16 43-4051 Customer Service Representatives 33,723 3,331 3,734 403 12
17 43-3031 Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks 32,471 4,635 4,973 338 7
18 47-2073 Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators 55,971 856 963 107 13
19 51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic 35,159 897 1,062 165 18
20 31-9091 Dental Assistants 39,206 606 832 226 37
21 25-2000 Primary Secondary School Teachers 45,624 8,075 9,292 1,217 15
22 13-1051 Cost Estimators 56,560 466 566 100 21
23 21-1020 Social Workers 32,661 977 1,124 147 15
24 21-1010 Counselors 41,181 889 1,044 155 17
25 11-9030 Education Administrators 69,975 853 932 79 9
26 41-3000 Sales Representatives, Services 54,384 2,494 2,695 201 8
27 29-2021 Dental Hygienists 62,261 492 677 185 38
28 47-1011 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers 59,162 945 1,092 147 16
31
EGR2 HOOSIER HOT 50 JOBS
    2009 2008 2018 2018 2018 2018
Code Occupational Title Wage Employment Projection Growth Change Openings
29 47-2152 Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters 53,277 1,151 1,256 105 9
30 43-6000 Secretaries and Administrative Assistants 35,737 8,205 8,868 663 8
31 41-1011 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers 38,349 3,659 3,822 163 4
32 47-2051 Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers 39,768 578 657 79 14
33 11-9111 Medical and Health Services Managers 78,989 676 801 125 18
34 17-2031 Biomedical Engineers 85,715 93 167 74 80
35 15-1051 Computer Systems Analysts 73,814 517 612 95 18
36 47-2031 Carpenters 36,919 4,384 4,492 108 2
37 43-1011 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers 48,864 2,422 2,602 180 7
38 51-4041 Machinists 35,501 2,198 2,277 79 4
39 27-3031 Public Relations Specialists 45,560 372 464 92 25
40 23-2000 Legal Support Workers 35,636 649 771 122 19
41 37-1000 Supervisors, Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Workers 36,873 1,046 1,139 93 9
42 13-1023 Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products 51,957 1,021 1,139 118 12
43 11-9199 Managers, All Other 60,067 1,084 1,166 82 8
44 51-9023 Mixing and Blending Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders 32,000 532 680 148 28
32
EGR2 HOOSIER HOT 50 JOBS
    2009 2008 2018 2018 2018 2018
Code Occupational Title Wage Employment Projection Growth Change Openings
45 29-1131 Veterinarians 103,747 156 203 47 30
46 19-1040 Medical Scientists 59,637 128 181 53 41
47 29-1122 Occupational Therapists 63,676 161 206 45 28
48 27-1020 Designers 34,684 1,246 1,342 96 8
49 13-2052 Personal Financial Advisors 89,665 161 190 29 18
50 47-2111 Electricians 50,269 1,295 1,342 47 4

2009 Wages 2009 Wages
Source Indiana Workforce Development Source Indiana Workforce Development Source Indiana Workforce Development
33
What about Small Businesses?
  • WorkOne, in partnership with SCORE and IEDC,
    conducted a Small Business Symposium
  • on March 6, 2013 
  • - SCORE focused upon providing the businesses
    with capabilities
  • to grow their business
  • - Department of Workforce Development provided
    information on
  • employers management of Unemployment
    Insurance  
  • - WorkOne Business Services team provided an
    overview of services being
  • offered to our customers as we move forward
    developing the workforce
    needed to meet the new emerging economy
  •   - A symposium is currently
    being planned for Elkhart County

34
DRIVING QUESTIONS FOR OUR REGION
  • How do we instill work ethic in individuals being
    asked to work at a lower rate of pay for a higher
    output of work?

35
DRIVING QUESTIONS FOR OUR REGION
  • How do we develop the relationships with our
    training providers to ensure the training
    provided truly meets the needs of our local
    employers?
  • Many training programs are being developed
    without consideration for the local needs. If
    individuals cannot get a job doing what they are
    now trained to do, what is the true value of that
    training? Where do they have to go to locate
    that kind of employment

36
DRIVING QUESTIONS FOR OUR REGION
  • How do we reduce the brain drain from our region?
  • How do we train to the future and meet the
    immediate employer needs?

37
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