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An Integrated English Course Book 3

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Title: An Integrated English Course Book 3


1
An Integrated English Course Book 3
  • Unit 1
  • Unit 2
  • Unit 3
  • Unit 4
  • Unit 5
  • Unit 6
  • Unit 7
  • Unit 8
  • Unit 9
  • Unit 10
  • Unit 11
  • Unit 12
  • Unit 13
  • Unit 14
  • Unit 15
  • Unit 16

2
Unit 1
  • Fresh Start

3
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 Fresh Start.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.
  • be aware of the cross-cultural differences of a
    freshmans experience in college.

4
Text 1. Fresh Start
  • Do you remember your first days at college? Did
    anything special happen then?
  • Are you afraid of making mistakes that cause
    embarrassment?

5
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraphs 1)
  • this is the introductory paragraph.
  • 1. What does first-gradish mean? (having the
    qualities and characteristics of a first-grade
    student)
  • 2. Why did the author have the impression that
    everyone on campus was watching me? (being too
    sensitive, was uneasy with her identity as a
    freshman. She thought a new student would attract
    others attention, as what she did or said was
    liable to be too naive to be right.)

6
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 2-9)
  • The writer recalls a few incidents during her
    first days of college.
  • 1. Why did the author exclaim what confidence,
    what reserve, what muscles! when saw the
    football player? (college life is new to her, it
    shows her excitement about the new college life.)
  • 2. Why did a cold sweat break out on the back of
    her neck? (she found she was in a wrong class.)
  • 4. Why did she remain in the wrong room? (She
    didn'tt want others to notice her ignorance.)
  • 5. How did the students react when she slipped
    and fell down? (They cheered and clapped. She
    felt embarrassed and humiliated.)
  • 6. Why did she dine on junk food for the next
    three days? (She thought she had become the
    laughing-stock on campus. She couldn'tt stand by
    being laughed at by the students in cafeteria.)

7
  • Part Three (Paragraph 10-14)
  • This is the concluding part.
  • 1. What was the key lesson Evelyn Herald
    learned
  • during her first few weeks in college?
    (The key lesson was that since people grow by
    trial and error, one should relax and be
    oneself.)
  • 2. What lessons have you learned from
    Evelyn
  • Heralds experiences after reading the
    article
  • Fresh Start?

8
LANGUAGE WORK
  •  Distinct clearly seen, heard, felt, understood,
    etc.
  • noticeable
  • E.g. 1) Now that the boss no longer present,
    there was
  • a distinct change in her attitude.
  • 2) The children have distinct memories
    of their
  • grandfather in his last days.

9
  • Clutch vt. to hold or grasp tightly vi. to try
    to grasp or seize
  • E.g. 1) The frightened woman clutched her bags
    to her breast.
  • 2) He clutched at the rope we had
    thrown to him but could
  • not reach it.
  • Reserve self-restraint in expression the habit
    of not showing ones feelings or thoughts
  • E.g. 1) Being a man of reserve, Mr. York was
    never popular
  • with his colleagues.
  • 2) Judy has tried every moment to
    break through the
  • reserve of her stepson.

10
  • Whereabouts n. approximate location ad. about
    where in, at or near what location
  • E.g. The orphans whereabouts is/are still
    unknown.
  • Whereabouts do you live?
  • Tip off to give an advance warning or hint to
  • E.g. Somebody must have tipped off the
    burglars off
  • that the house world be empty.

11
  • Flail to (cause something to) wave or swing
    about wildly
  • E.g. 1) I flailed her arms to get her
    attention.
  • 2) The babys feet flailed under the
    quilt.
  • Rear end buttocks
  • Somebodys heart goes out to somebody used to
    say that someone feels a lot of sympathy towards
    another person
  • E.g. His heart went out to Mrs. Bradshaw and
    her
  • fatherless child.

12
  • Slink to go or move in a quiet, stealthy way to
    move as if one feels guilty or ashamed, or does
    not want to be seen
  • E.g. 1) She tried to slink out of the office
    so that nobody
  • would see her.
  • 2) The cat slunk through the grass
    toward its prey.
  • Malicious having the nature or wish to hurt
    others
  • E.g. a malicious remark

13
  • Shackle a metal fastening, usually one of a
    pair, for encircling and confining the ankle or
    wrist of a prisoner or captive a restraint or
    check to action or progress, often used in the
    plural form
  • E.g. 1) The policeman placed shackles on the
    suspects
  • hands.
  • 2) It is hard to break through the
    shackles of habit.

14
QUESTIONS
  • What is the text concerned with?
  • What is the message of the text?

15
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • A University Stands and Shines was the authors
    response to a toast in his honor. In the text, he
    highly evaluates the significance of university
    and the honor of being a member of a university.
  • A Topic to discuss
  • How do you think a university is even more
    enduring than religions and dynasties?

16
Unit 2
  • Tyranny of the Urgent

17
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 Tyranny of the
    Urgent.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.

18
Text 1. Tyranny of the Urgent
  • Do you often feel pressed by time? Do you hate
    meeting deadlines?
  • Do you think the busier you are, the more
    accomplished your life will be?

19
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraphs 1-2)
  • The first two paragraphs serve as an
    introduction. In the first paragraph, the writer
    mainly explains why people wish for a thirty-four
    hour day. In the second paragraph, he goes on to
    explain why this extra time may not help people
    much. The following questions are suggested
  • 1. How does the author introduce his topic?
    (by a rhetorical question)
  • 2. Does the author believe that this extra
    time will help people to ease the pressure? (No.
    The author does not think that the prolongation
    of time may solve the problem of shortage of time
    once for all because ones work is endless.)

20
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 3-5)
  • This is the main body of the essay. The
    writer explains the people of priorities and
    explores the cause of tyranny of the urgent.
  • 1. What is the problem of priorities? (What
    should people deal with first when confronted
    with endless work?)
  • 2. When are people liable to frustration?
    (When they find numerous tasks unfinished and
    especially when they find that they have left the
    important tasks aside.)
  • 3. Why do people often delay an important
    task? (People are constantly driven by urgent
    tasks while they are usually given more time to
    accomplish important tasks. As a result, they are
    likely to lack a sense of urgent for important
    tasks.

21
  • Part Three (Paragraph 6)
  • In this paragraph, the writer comes to the
    conclusion that we have become slaves to the
    tyranny of the urgent.
  • 1. Why does the author say A mans home is
    no longer his
  • castle? (A castle is a strongly-built
    building fortified against attacks, especially as
    in former times. In old days, one might be kept
    away from all the worries about work once he was
    back home. But in modern times, with the
    development of telecommunication, one can hardly
    avoid being interrupted even when he is at home.)
  • 2. What does tyranny of the urgent mean?
    (It implies that the urgent things outweigh
    everything else.)

22
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Trail a stream of dust, smoke, people, vehicles,
    etc. behind something moving
  • E.g. 1) He went inside, leaving a trail of
    muddy footprints
  • behind him.
  • 2) The typhoon has left a trail of
    muddy foot prints behind
  • him.
  • Haunt to be always in the thoughts of
  • E.g. 1) The decision to leave her children
    now haunts
  • her.
  • 2) Thirty years after the fire he is
    still haunted by
  • images of death and destruction.

23
  • Exacting (of a person or piece of work)
    demanding much care, effort and attention
  • E.g.1) The trains used in the Channel Tunnel
    have to
  • conform to exacting fire safely
    standards.
  • 2)Volunteers are needed for an
    exacting
  • assignment.

24
  • Dilemma a situation in which one has to make a
    difficult choice between two courses of action,
    both perhaps equally undesirable
  • E.g. 1) The doctors dilemma was whether he
    should tell the
  • patient the truth or not.
  • 2) The president finds himself in a
    dilemma over how to
  • tackle the crisis.

25
  • Priority something that needs attention,
    consideration, service, etc. before others
  • E.g. 1) You have to learn to get your
    priorities straight.
  • 2) Getting your priorities in order is
    an effective way not
  • to waste time on trivial or even
    meaningless pursuits.
  • Misgiving (a feeling of ) doubt, distrust, or
    fear, especially about a further event
  • E.g. 1) We had misgivings about flying near
    mountains in such
  • weather.
  • 2) The plan seemed utterly impractical
    and I was filled
  • with misgiving about it.

26
  • Crowd out to keep out for lack of space
  • E.g. Pressure on study space has crowd out new
    students from
  • many university libraries.
  • Maxim a short saying that expresses a general
    truth or rule for good and sensible behavior
  • E.g. Aesops fables illustrate moral maxims.
  • Rebuke to speak angrily to someone
  • E.g. 1) Her mother rebuked her for
    frightening
  • her brother.
  • 2) He was rebuked for cheating.

27
  • Breach to break (a promise, agreement, etc.) to
    make an opening in a wall or fence
  • E.g. 1) They breached the agreement they had
    made with their
  • employer.
  • 2) The defenses were easily breached.
  • Imperious (too) commanding expecting obedience
    from others
  • E.g. 1) She sent them away with an imperious
    wave of the hand.
  • 2) From across the table he gave an
    imperious look.

28
  • Devour to used up all of something to eat
    hungrily and in large quantities, so that nothing
    remains.
  • E.g. 1) In the light of recent incidents, we
    are asking our
  • customers to take particular care
    of their personal
  • belongings.
  • 2) In the light of this information, it
    is now possible to
  • identify a number of key issues.

29
  • Prominence the fact or quality of being
    well-known and important
  • E.g. 1) He came to prominence during the World
    Cup in Italy.
  • 2) Most of the papers give to
    prominence to the same story
  • this morning.

30
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • Time illustrates the authors view on time from
    several aspects, trying to imply than to value
    time is to be wise.
  • A topic for discussion
  • What is your view on time?

31
Unit 3
  • Chinese Food

32
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 Fresh Start.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.
  • be aware of the cross-cultural differences of
    food between Chinese and Western.

33
Text 1. Chinese Food
  • How important is food to the Chinese people?
  • What are the characteristics of Chinese cuisine?

34
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraphs 1-4)
  • Discuss the difference in Chinese and Western
    attitudes
  • toward food. Here are some questions for
    consideration
  • In the life of an individual, how, according to
    Kenneth Lo, is food different from music, a
    lecture or conversation, or matters of business?
    (As music, a lecture or conversation, or matters
    of business will never be integrated into ones
    body or spiritual and moral fiber, one may not
    attend to them whole-heartedly. Yet, food is
    different. As it is going to be part of our
    bodies, it requires our serious treatment.)
  • How does Lo make his point clear? (by comparison
    and contrast)
  • What is the Chinese attitude of food? (They
    regard food as their first happiness.)

35
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 5-6)
  • Deal with the reasons of the international
    success
  • of Chinese food.
  • Why does the writer mention from Hong Kong to
    Honolulu to Huboken to Huddersfield? (These
    places with H as the initial are located in
    different areas of the world. They are randomly
    chosen, just to show the ubiquity of Chinese
    food.)
  • What has helped the spread of Chinese food to the
    rest of the world? (First, many people from Hong
    Kong, China opened restaurants in various
    places. Secondly, the Western people have become
    interested in the pursuit of sensual pleasures
    and are eager to the old Western habits. Finally,
    sensual concept is an inherent element of Chinese
    food.

36
  • Part Three (Para. 7-9) Elaborate the
    nature of Chinese food.
  • 1. How does the writer explain that the
    traditional high-quality Chinese meal is a
    serious matter? (He uses figures to explain how
    complicated and time-consuming it is to prepare
    the Chinese meal. The he lists several methods of
    cooking to show that cooking itself is no easy
    work.
  • 2. What else must be pleased besides the palate?
    Why? (The eye must be pleased, to. The philosophy
    that underlies Chinese food and everything else
    is Taoism, which signifies the proper human
    conduct and the ultimate harmony of the universe.
    In the enjoyment of food, the eye, as well as the
    palate, is the essential element to be please.)

37
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Derive from to come from a source or origin
  • E.g. The word deduct derives from Latin.
  • Ecstasy sudden intense feeling or excitement
  • E.g. They went into ecstasies over the view.
  • Smother to cover closely or thickly
  • E.g. The cook smothered a steak with
    mushrooms.
  • Marked striking conspicuous
  • E.g. John worked really hard. He showed
    marked improvement in all the tests.

38
  • Assert to declare strongly
  • E.g. He asserted boldly that he was innocent
    of the crime.
  • Bedeck to decorate to hang ornaments or
    decorations on
  • E.g. He led us into a room bedecked with
    tinsel.
  • Infamous deserving of or causing an evil
    reputation
  • E.g. He is famous for saying that cheating is
    the way the game is played.

39
  • Part and parcel an essential part that must not
    be ignored
  • E.g. Its best to accept that some
    inconveniences are
  • part and parcel of travel.
  • Phenomenal very remarkable
  • E.g. He enjoyed phenomenal success as a race
  • care driver.
  • Inherent existing as a natural and permanent
    quality
  • E.g. She stared fastidiously at the dirty
    table.
  • He fastidiously copied every word of
    his
  • notes onto clean paper.

40
  • Fastidiously with excessive care of delicacy
  • E.g. She stared fastidiously at the dirty
    table.
  • He fastidiously copied every word of
    his notes
  • onto clean paper.
  • Chore a hard or unpleasant task a small job
    that someone has to do regularly
  • E.g.In 1862, a technique was contrived to
    take a
  • series of photographs showing stages of
    movement.
  • Conform to act in accordance with to comply
    with
  • E.g. He clothes are conformed to fashion.
  • Though educated, we conform to some
    old customs.

41
  • Palate the sense of taste
  • E.g. Well have a dinner to delight the
    palate.
  • I let my palate dictate what I eat.
  • Elusive hard to express or define
  • E.g. He tried to recall the elusive thought he
    had had months before.
  • Piquant having a pleasant sharp or strong taste
  • E.g. With that piquant tomato sauce, the dish
    tastes much better.

42
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • Say No to Western Fast Food introduces a new
    phenomena which is happening around China now. It
    implies the harm the fast food brings to people.
    On the other hand, it doesn'tt deny the
    advantage of eating in the fast food restaurants.
    The article compares fast food with Chinese
    traditional food, emphasizing the significance of
    keeping food tradition in China.
  • A topic for discussion
  • What should we learn from the western
    restaurants and what should not we learn from the
    western restaurant, according to the author of
    text II?

43
Unit 4
  • Why I Want a Wife

44
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 Why I Want a Wife.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.

45
Text 1. Fresh Start
  • What role does a wife usually play in a
    traditional Chinese family? What role does an
    American wife play in her family? Are there any
    similarities or differences between them?
  • Is there any change in womens status in China
    and around the world?

46
  • The passage can be divided into four parts.
  • Part One (Paragraphs 1-2)
  • The authors recent encounter with a friend
    of hers who has just had a divorce and who is
    looking for another wife make her think about the
    topic of wanting a wife.
  • The writer introduces her identity in the
    first paragraph and starts her bitter satire, in
    the second paragraph, on those men desiring for a
    wife who fits in with their ideal notions by
    pretending that she would like to have a wife
    with all possible virtues.

47
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 3-7)
  • The writer divides a wifes duties and
    responsibility into various functions or services
    according to the ideal notions most men are
    likely to have for a wife.
  • Three main duties are taking care of
    the baby arranging the husbands social
    activities and satisfying husbands sexual
    needs.
  • wife is consistently used in the text
    to help emphasize a wifes role, duties and
    responsibilities by de-emphasizing her sex.
  • The writer presents in an ironical
    tone all the duties a wife should fulfill.

48
  • Part Three (Para. 14-20)
  • By the way he behaved when confronted with
    another sad moment---the loss of his grandpa, the
    author shows us that he came to understand what
    his grandpa had taught him.
  • One would divorce the present wife and marry
    another new one, leaving the ex-wife solely
    responsible for the care of the children when one
    find a more suitable wife.

49
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Incidentally in a way that was not planned, but
    as a result of something else
  • Ex-wife former wife
  • If need be if necessary
  • Rambling (of a speech, writing) disorder and
    wandering
  • E.g. 1) Ive just had this rambling,
    incoherent letter from my
  • sister.
  • 2) His actions were accomplished by a
    rambling
  • monologue.

50
  • Replenish to fill up again
  • E.g. 1) Let me replenish your glass.
  • 2) Food stocks were replenished by
    imports from
  • the USA.
  • Sensitive to strongly or easily influenced or
    changed by
  • E.g. She is sensitive to the change of
    weather.
  • Clutter up to make untidy or confused,
    especially by filling with useless or unwanted
    things.
  • E.g. 1) This room is so impressive that it
    would be a shame to
  • clutter it up.
  • 2) She says she deliberately tried to
    clutter up her mind.

51
  • Entail to make (an event or action) necessary
    to involve
  • E.g. 1) The changed outlook entails higher
    economic
  • growth than was previously
    assumed.
  • 2) Repairing the roof will entail
    spending a lot of
  • money.
  • Adherence to acting in accordance (with
    something) following (something)
  • E.g. 1) He was noted for his strict adherence
    to the rules.
  • 2) The villagers adherence to their
    religious beliefs
  • impressed all the visitors.
  • Monogamy the custom or practice of having only
    on wife or husband at one time
  • Replacewith to change one for another, often
    better, newer.
  • E.g. Weve replaced those typewriters with
    computers.

52
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • Of Marriage and Single Life expresses the
    writers view on marriage or single life for a
    man. It illustrates the advantages on marriage an
    being single, mean it indicates the features on
    both sides for a man. The writer tries to
    enlighten people what kind of life people will
    choose eventually, get married or being single
    without suggesting directly.
  • A topic for discussion
  • Based on your reading and person views,
    decide whether you would like to be married or
    single in your life.

53
Unit 5
  • The Company Man

54
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 The Company Man.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.

55
Text 1. The Company Man
  • What do you think is the life of a typical
    workaholic like?
  • How important do you think work is to a person?

56
  • Highlights
  • The text talks about a company man devoted all
    his thoughts and energy to work and everything
    else secondary to that and the end might be
    considered tragically heroic he worked himself
    to death. The author paints an ironic picture of
    the cutthroat life of a company man and his
    family. The man was a workaholic who died of a
    heart attack, which surprised no one. His wife
    lost him years ago to his work, and his children
    did not know him well.

57
  • The passage can be divided into four parts.
  • Part One (Paragraph 1)
  • This is introductory part of the text. The
    first sentence provide the information about
    who, what, how and when. Finally
    suggests the doomed ending of the workaholic.
    Precisely emphasizes his devotion to work, as
    he died on a Sunday, a day when people are
    supposed to take a rest.

58
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 2-6)
  • This part reports how devoted the man
    was to his work. Unlike most essays which usually
    make it clear who the character is at the very
    beginning, this essay begins with the pronoun
    He. At the end of the third paragraph where the
    name was finally mentioned, readers only get to
    know the first name of the deceased, not his full
    name. This, on the one hand, is meant to get the
    fact that workaholicism has become a common
    phenomenon. The deceased was only one of the many
    workaholics who bury themselves in their work and
    forget all about their individuality.
  • The man that the author describes in the
    text was a workaholic who cared about nothing
    but work while many others in his company worked
    four days a week, he worked long hours for six
    days every week.

59
  • Part Three (Para. 7-13)
  • This part describes Phils role in his
    family. At home, the wife has lost her husband
    too his work for many years. And his eldest son
    tried to know what his father was like from his
    neighbors. His daughter found nothing to talk
    with him and his youngest son had very little to
    share with him. To his children, he seems like a
    stranger.
  • The author repeats he finally worked himself
    to death, at precisely 300a.m. Sunday morning
    three time. By repeating this sentence, the
    author relates the two contradictory
    ideas----work on Sunday and thus reveals the
    personality of the man and suggests that the man
    is destined to be exhausted.

60
  • Part Four (Paragraph 14-16)
  • After the cause of Phils death being
    restated, the author goes on to report the
    company presidents inquiry for his successor.
  • By putting contradictory actions or ideas
    together such as work himselfat 300 a.m.
    Sunday morning, On Sundays, Phil wore a sports
    jacket to the office he (his son) went around
    the neighborhood researching his father, the
    author creates the imagine of a workaholic, one
    who worked on days when others were having their
    holidays and one who failed to be a qualified
    husband and father while being successful in his
    career. The article ends with a presidents
    question whos been working the hardest? this
    question shows that being hard-working is the
    deciding factor in determining whether one will
    be promoted. From this, we can learn that it was
    this social value of the competitive society that
    determined Phils attitude towards work and
    caused his death.

61
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Precisely exactly
  • E.g. They arrived at five oclock precisely.
  • Overweight weighing more than is normal,
    necessary, or allowed, especially having more
    body weight than is considered normal or healthy
    for ones age or build.
  • Fat implies excessive weight and is generally
    unfavorable in its connotations
  • E.g. Charlie is not merely overweight but
    downright fat.
  • Obese implies gross overweight

62
  • Fleshy suggests a not necessarily excessive
    abundance of flesh
  • E.g. Susan quite likes her boyfriends firm,
    fleshy arms.
  • Stout is sometimes used a polite term to
    describe fatness. In stricter application stout
    refers to person with a thickset, bulky figure
  • E.g. Even slim girls can become stout
    matrons.
  • Pudgy means short and fat
  • E.g His pudgy fingers look really funny.
  • Plump applies to pleasing fullness of figure
  • E.g. Everybody loves Rita, the plump, rosy
    little girl.
  • A chubby person is round and plump
  • E.g. a chubby toddler chubby cheeks

63
  • Survive to live longer than to outline
  • E.g. its amazing that she could have
    survived all her children
  • and grandchildren.
  • Marketable wanted by purchasers or employers
  • E.g. They have failed to launch a marketable
    model for years.
  • Straighten out to solve or settle to remove
    difficulties (from something) or the doubt or
    ignorance (in somebodys mind)
  • E.g. We need someone capable of
    straightening out all the confusion.

64
  • QUESTIONS
  • What is the text concerned with?
  • What is the message of the text?

65
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • The Unhappy American Way attempts to tell the
    readers the major causes that prevent people from
    being happy is that most Americans act on some
    principles rather than on impulse.. They believe
    in a general theory on how to make one happy, but
    the theory is basically false. A competitive
    struggle dominates life in which happiness lies
    in getting ahead of those who are your neighbors,
    colleagues or friends. They forget joys devoid of
    competitive elements. If people desire to live a
    healthy and happy life, they should allow impulse
    to have sufficient scope to remain alive and they
    should preserve a range of interest.
  • A topic for discussion
  • What are the causes prevent people from being
    happy as much as possible?

66
Unit 6
  • Knowledge and Wisdom

67
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 The Company Man.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.

68
Text 1. The Company Man
  • What kind of people are considered wise? What
    are the elements that constitute wisdom?
  • How can you become wise? Do you think what you
    are doing in college contributes to wisdom?

69
  • Highlights
  • The author of the text tries to tell us the
    essence of wisdom lies in impartiality, the
    ability to defy the physical world. Russell
    believes knowledge itself cannot save the world.
    Knowledge without wisdom will not benefit the
    world and in some cases will even pose a serious
    threat to humanity. So a wise perosn has to have
    a comprehensive view. The author also implies
    that the process of growing wise is that of
    tearing itself away from the physical and
    emotional world and moving into a higher stage,
    the spiritual world.

70
  • The passage can be divided into two parts.
  • Part One (Paragraph 1)
  • The first paragraph serves as introduction.
    The view is commonly accepted by most people that
    knowledge is not equal to wisdom as history has
    suggested that the acquisition of knowledge does
    not necessarily lead to the increase of wisdom.
    In the first paragraph, the author states the
    purpose of writing, which is the discussion of
    what contributes to wisdom and how to teach
    wisdom.

71
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 2-5)
  • This part is the main body of the essay. The
    four paragraph tell us what wisdom is. The author
    holds that these factors contribute to wisdom a
    sense of proportion, an awareness of the ends of
    human life and emancipation from personal
    prejudice. A sense of proportion means the
    ability to take account of all the importance
    factors in a problem and to attach to each its
    due weight. In other words, it refers to the
    ability to judge correctly what factors are of
    more importance and what are of less importance.
  • The ends of human life refers to the goals
    of human life.
  • The author suggests that people cannot avoid
    being partial. The difference between a wise man
    and an unwise man is the former has a lesser
    degree of partiality. As one becomes more
    impartial, his wisdom grows.

72
  • Part Four (Paragraph 14-16)
  • After the cause of Phils death being
    restated, the author goes on to report the
    company presidents inquiry for his successor.
  • By putting contradictory actions or ideas
    together such as work himselfat 300 a.m.
    Sunday morning, On Sundays, Phil wore a sports
    jacket to the office he (his son) went around
    the neighborhood researching his father, the
    author creates the imagine of a workaholic, one
    who worked on days when others were having their
    holidays and one who failed to be a qualified
    husband and father while being successful in his
    career. The article ends with a presidents
    question whos been working the hardest? this
    question shows that being hard-working is the
    deciding factor in determining whether one will
    be promoted. From this, we can learn that it was
    this social value of the competitive society that
    determined Phils attitude towards work and
    caused his death.

73
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Surpass to do or be better than
  • E.g. 1) The student was surpassing himself in
    mathematics.
  • 2) Tom surpassed all expectations.
  • Cease to come to an end
  • E.g. He never ceased from his activities as
    propagandist.
  • Means a method that enables a purpose to be
    fulfilled
  • E.g. 1) He was prepared to use any means to
    get what he
  • wanted.
  • 2) The quickest means of travel is by
    plane.

74
  • Contribute to to help to cause or bring about
  • E.g. Her singing will contribute greatly to
    the success of the party.
  • Attach due weight to to ascribe proper
    importance to
  • E.g. 1) They will surely meet with due
    punishment.
  • 2) Due care must be taken while one is
    driving.
  • Populous densely populated
  • Spectacular strikingly large and obvious
  • Pursuit the action of following somebody or
    something
  • E.g. 1) The police care raced through the
    streets in pursuit of
  • another car.
  • 2) He devoted every spare moment to
    the pursuit of his
  • passion.

75
  • Many eminent historians have done more harm than
    good what many eminent historians have done is
    more damaging than help
  • E.g. 1) She is more thoughtless than stupid.
  • 2) Their beliefs are more Christian
    than Buddhist.
  • Lack the state of not having enough of
    something to be without or deficient in not o
    have enough of
  • E.g. 1) He failed in the appeal for lack of
    evidence
  • 2) There is no lack of entertainment
    abroad the ship.

76
  • Inculcate to fix (ideas and principles, etc.) in
    the mind of (somebody)
  • E.g. 1) Its important to inculcate you with
    a respect for culture.
  • 2) They will try to inculcate you with
    a respect for culture.
  • Standard-bearer a leading figure in a cause or
    movement
  • Emancipation from freedom from political,
    moral, intellectual or social restraints
    offensive to reason or justice
  • Confer to grant
  • E.g. 1) The queen conferred knighthoods on
    several distinguished men.
  • 2) The honor was conferred on him
    just after the war.

77
  • Search for to look carefully in order to find
    something
  • E.g. She searched through her purse for the
    keys.
  • Appalling horrifying, shocking
  • E.g. 1) When will this appalling war end?
  • 2) He became, as it were, a man
    without a country.
  • Instill to gradually but firmly establish (an
    idea or attitude, especially a desirable on) in a
    persons mind
  • E.g. It is a part of the teachers job to
    instill self-confidence
  • into his or her students.

78
  • Be bound up with be involved in, dependant on,
    connected with
  • E.g. 1) The survival of these creatures is
    intimately bound up
  • with the health of the ocean.
  • 2) Dominant and submissive behavior is
    closely bound up
  • with childhood.
  • Impartially the condition of treating all rivals
    or disputants equally
  • E.g. 1) Certainly ministers are pressing for
    new rules or
  • disputants equally.
  • 2) Political impartiality is
    strengthened.

79
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • How to Become a Man of Genius is mainly target at
    D. H. Lawrence. The essay indicates the major
    conflict between Russell and Lawrence for the
    emotional, physical side. Russell despites
    Lawrence for his primitive mant understanding of
    the relationship between men and women and his
    reliance on passion and desire for emancipation.
    And Lawrence criticizes the cold and impotent
    nature of rationality each of them is just the
    opposite of the other..

80
Unit 7
  • The Chaser

81
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 The Chaser.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.

82
Text 1. The Company Man
  • Do you believe love can be fostered? How can you
    lure one into love with you?
  • What is likely to happen when a couple no longer
    love each other?

83
  • Highlights
  • The text is a story tells a young man who fall
    in love one-sidedly are seldom right enough to
    win young ladys heart. He went to an old man to
    buy love lotion for the girl he fancies. The
    conversation between the young man and the old
    man indicates serious philosophy. One of the
    moral lessons the text contains is anything
    precious, love included, is most likely to have
    an end. A person can easily fall in love and get
    married, but what await him or her could be
    endless remorse, and a with that it might end as
    soon as possible. So one should be wise and keep
    their eyes open when they are in love though love
    is said to be blind.

84
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraph 1)
  • The first paragraph describes a timid, skeptical
    and hesitant character, Alan Austen.

85
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 2-12)
  • The old man is trying to sell his
    mixture.
  • Paragraph 2 indicates the young man is very
    nervous and timid.
  • Paragraph 3 from the greeting of the old man, it
    indicates the old man is expecting Alans
    arrival.
  • The following paragraphs implies the experienced
    old man had
  • encountered many young men who had been in the
    grip of
  • romantic desire before, but who eventually got
    tried of the
  • possessive love they had experienced. He knew for
    sure that
  • Austens possessive love would not last long. It
    would eventually
  • bore and anger him. He expected that when his
    enthusiastic
  • passion changed into hatred. Austen would come to
    him again,
  • because he had already seen those disillusioned
    customers return
  • to buy the chaser so that they could be free
    from the women for
  • whom they had previously bought the love potion.

86
  • Part Three (Paragraphs 13-45)
  • This part mainly developed through the
    dialogue between the old man and Alan. Alan got
    to know about the love potion and in the end
    bought it.
  • For Alan, love means entirely passion for
    lover.
  • The surprising ending suggests that the wise
    old man had a good understanding of men like
    Austen they were filled with illusion about love
    but once in the possession of this love, they
    were most likely to be tormented to such a degree
    that they would like to buy the life-cleaner. The
    cynical tone of the old man gives what he said a
    double meaning.

87
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Peer to look very carefully or with difficulty,
    especially as if not able to see clearly
  • E.g. She peered over my shoulder at the
    computer screen and
  • asked about the figures.
  • Peep to look at something quickly and
    secretly, especially through a hole or other
    small openings
  • E.g. Now and then she peeped to see if he was
    noticing her.
  • Make somebodys acquaintance to meet somebody
    for the first time
  • E.g. He made her acquaintance at a dance.

88
  • Imperceptible that cannot be noticed or felt
    because so small, slight or gradual
  • E.g. Marthas hesitation was almost
    imperceptible.
  • Apprehensively full of anxiety about the future
  • E.g. They looked at each other
    apprehensively.
  • Students are waiting with
    apprehension for their final exam
  • results.
  • Oblige (1) to do somebody a favor to fulfill
    the wises of
  • E.g. She asked him to lend her
    his car, and he willingly
  • obliged her.
  • (2) to make it necessary for
    somebody to do something
  • E.g. The heavy snow obliged me
    to abandon the car and
  • continued ton foot.

89
  • Rapture great joy and delight
  • E.g. They stared with rapture at the new
    opera house.
  • Overwhelm (1) to give somebody a particular
    feeling very
  • strongly
  • E.g. The family of the victim was overwhelmed
    by /with grief.
  • The need to talk to someone, anyone,
    overwhelmed me.
  • Overwhelming very large or very great
  • E.g. The overwhelming majority of small
    business went back
  • within the first twelve months.

90
  • Fervently with deep sincere feelings
  • E.g. It is a cause of which we have
    campaigned fervently these
  • past four years.
  • We fervently believe in the peaceful
    reunification of the
  • motherland.
  • Be better off to have more than one used to have
    or most other people
  • E.g. Mr. Cooper was much better off when he
    got promoted,
  • and even could afford foreign travel.
  • Be better off doing/ to do something to be
    wiser to do something specified
  • E.g. If youve got heavy bags you are better
    off taking/to take a
  • taxi.

91
  • QUESTIONS
  • What is the text concerned with?
  • What is the message of the text?

92
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • The story describes a hero tried all means to
    instruct a girl on how to become a smarter person
    and he suggested a kind of intimate relationship
    between them. But the girl pointed out different
    fallacies in his logic. It tells us one should
    not be too calculate in everything, particularly
    in love that is the result of natural affection
    developed over a long time.
  • A topic for discussion
  • Is love built up gradually between loves or
    generated naturally?

93
Unit 8
  • Fan, Oh Boy. Fun. You Could Die from It

94
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage through
    an intensive reading of Text 1 Oh Boy. Fun. You
    Could Die from It.
  • comprehend the topic sentences in Text 1
    thoroughly and be able to paraphrase them.
  • get a list of new words and structures and use
    them freely in conversation and writing.

95
Text 1. The Company Man
  • What is the greatest fun in your life?
  • How important is fun in your life?

96
  • Highlights
  • According to the author, fun is not a family
    visit to Disney World not is it celebrating big
    occasions. Fun is simple pleasure in life, which
    lies rather in ones work and the fulfillment of
    ones duty. The author points out that fun cannot
    be compared with duty and morality. People should
    not be obsessed with fun instead they should
    devote themselves to their work and the
    fulfillment of ones responsibility.

97
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraph 1-5)
  • The first five paragraphs, which from the
    introduction to the essay, provide a stipulate
    definition to fun.
  • The first two paragraphs state fun is hard to
    have and fun is a rare jewel. The author uses
    definition, comparison and a series of questions
    to introduce the topic.
  • By making a startling statement and raising a
    series of questions, the author points out that
    fun has become the major concern of people. It
    has overweighed many other questions.

98
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 6-11)
  • In this part of the essay, the writer
    offers the extended definition of the word fun
    by negation.
  • In paragraph 6, the author lists several
    things that are supposed to bring people fun,
    like family outings, sex, education, work, Wart
    Disney, church and staying fit.
  • In paragraph 8, the author tried to clarify
    something will not bring people fun, like in a
    test, dirty bumper, stick refrigerator doors are
    some to the things that are not sources of fun.
    Some people resort to thrilling ways such as
    adventures, immoral actions, crimes or alcohol to
    have fun. The author creates a conversational
    style by using everything, everybody, Golly
    gee.

99
  • Paragraph 9 tells us when people live under
    pressure stress, they can hardly relax and the
    monotonous routine work is not exciting enough
    for them. Only when they indulge themselves in
    drugs and alcohol can they forget the worries of
    the day and have a little fun.
  • Paragraph 10 with high expectation for fun,
    people are not content with the joy that big
    occasion such as holidays, weddings or birthdays
    bring them. To make up for the inadequacy of fun
    and joy, they are still expecting the next big
    occasion which might bring them excitement.

100
  • Part Three (Para. 12-15) the essay
    concludes with an anecdote that further explains
    what fun is.
  • Paragraph 12 according to the author, we
    should treat fun respectfully. Fun is not
    supposed to be everywhere. We cannot easily get
    fun out of everything.
  • Paragraph 13 the author develops the idea
    that fun is a mystery.
  • In paragraph 14, the author claims that as a
    rule, no holiday, no big occasions would take
    place on this day. But if we treat fun properly,
    we can have fun even on such an ordinary day.

101
LANGUAGE WORK
  • Overshadow to make somebody or something less
    successful, important, or impressive by
    comparison with others to dominate
  • E.g. 1) Ben overshadows all his colleagues.
  • 2) She is overshadowed by her younger
    and more
  • attractive sister.
  • Flunk to fail, especially in a course or an exam
  • E.g. The boy was upset because he flunked in
    an English exam
  • flunk out to expel or be expelled from a
    school or course because of work that does not
    meet required standards
  • E.g. We didnt flunk out, but our records
    werent so good.

102
  • Epitome an ideal a typical representation
  • E.g. His father is the epitome of goodness.
  • Epitomize to be an epitome of something
  • E.g. 1) He epitomizes the loving father.
  • 2) She epitomizes all the good
    qualities for her family.
  • Damper something that stops an occasion from
    being as enjoyable as it was intended to be
  • E.g. The bad news put a damper on the party.
  • Blaspheme to swear, to use words which show a
    lack of respect for God or religion
  • E.g. The bank manager began to rage and
    blasphemed Islam.

103
  • Malted milk a soluble powder made of dried milk,
    malted barley, and wheat flour
  • Chunky 1) (of candy, etc.)containing small,
    thick pieces
  • E.g. chunky peanut butter chunky soup
  • 2) (of a man) short and strong stocky
  • E.g. A chunky man usually has a wide upper
    body and looks
  • strong.
  • Scan 1) to examine something carefully, with the
    eyes or with a machine, in order to obtain
    information
  • E.g. She anxiously scanned the faces of the
    young men leaving the train in
  • the hope of finding her son.
  • 2) to scan a text can also mean to look
    through it quickly in order to find a piece of
    information that one wants or get a general idea
    of what the text contains

104
  • QUESTIONS
  • What is the text concerned with?
  • What is the message of the text?

105
MAIN IDEAS 0F TEXT 2
  • The Age of Thrill tells us our age is the age of
    thrill. It generates many more thrills than any
    of the previous ages did and people in our age
    expect to be thrilled as continuously as people
    in no other ages did. Happiness is not rooted in
    thrills, which are merely amusements. Happiness
    chiefly derives from affection for people and
    interest in various objects in the external
    world. Those who are truly happy to do not
    dependent on thrills for their happiness, for
    thrills can only help to get rid of the feeling
    of boredom.
  • A topic for discussion
  • Should we deny ourselves entirely the
    excitement of thrills?

106
  • Unit 9

107
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • By the end of this unit, you are supposed to
  • grasp the authors purpose of writing and make
    clear the structure of the whole passage.
  • comprehend and paraphrase the useful or important
    expressions/sentences.
  • Learn the new words and structures, and use them
    freely in conversation and writing.
  • have a good understanding of the personality
    traits and the tips given in the text.

108
Text I On Becoming a Better Student
  • Topics for Pre-reading Discussion
  • What are the greatest problems your group has in
    English study? Specify two or three, or recommend
    your effective study habits.
  • As a student, what is your expectation of
    teachers? Do you expect them to be omniscient and
    omnipotent, or as human as you are?
  • What do you think are the personality traits of a
    fine student?

109
Highlights
  • Donna Farhi Schuster is a certified yoga teacher
    from the San Francisco Bay Area. This article
    originally appeared in Yoga Journal in
    September/October 1987.
  • The text presents a snapshot of major qualities
    of a good student and tips for an aspiring
    student in a clear and concise way so as to give
    students some guidelines on how to become a
    better student.
  • The author wants to tell us that good study
    skills and positive personality traits are
    actually more important to academic success than
    intelligence and hard work.

110
  • The passage can be divided into three parts.
  • Part One (Paragraphs 1-2) the writer explains
    what teaching and learning is meant to be
    students should learn how to learn by themselves.
  • Part Two (Paragraphs 3-9) the writer discusses
    various factors that will make a good student
    curiosity, discipline, risk-taking, initiative,
    and enthusiasm.
  • Part Three (Para. 10) the writer gives advice
    to the aspiring students be attentive, be seen,
    be on time, be consistent, listen with your whole
    body, appreciate constructive criticism, ask
    pertinent questions, dont be too free to express
    your disagreement, and let your teacher know how
    much you appreciate him or her.

111
LANGUAGE POINTS
  • 1.      We may even have the expectations that
    they be endless repositories of skill and
    knowledge from which we may partake at will.
  • gt Verbs to express order, decision, suggestion,
    etc., and their derivatives (as expectations
    here) are usu. followed by clauses in the
    be-pattern subjunctive mood.

112
  • 2.      repository n. a place where things are
    stored.
  • e.g. My father is a repository of interesting
    facts.
  • 3.      at will whenever, wherever, etc., one
    wishes.
  • e.g. You can use my car at will (at any time
    you want to).
  • 4.      feel weighted feel anxious or nervous
  • e.g. He felt heavily weighted with such high
    expectations from his parents.
  • 5.      partial negation in all not structure
  • Translate the sentence All the words and
    theories and techniques are of no use to students
    who have yet to open themselves with receptivity
    and to take it upon themselves to practice.

113
  • 6.  receptive adj. able or quick to receive
    new ideas, suggestions, etc.
  • e.g. Generally speaking, young people are more
    receptive to new developments than old people.
  • 7.      paraphrase learn how to find themselves
    through their own investigation.(para.2)
  • 8.    embody v. to serve as a symbol or
    expression of an idea, suggestion, etc.
  • e.g. He embodies all the best qualities of a
    teacher.
  • 9.      not so much as not but rather
  • e.g. Success in life does not depend so much on
    ones school record as on ones honesty and
    diligence.
  • Compare not so much as She is a manager in a
    company, but it is strange that she cannot so
    much as write her own name well.

114
  • 10.    in a good/bad/favorable light (so as to
    be seen well or badly)
  • e.g. It is hard to view his conduct in a
    favorable light.
  • 11.      discipline
  • a. training, esp. of the mind and character,
    aimed at producing self-control, obedience, etc.
  • E.g. Military discipline is imposed on freshmen
    each year
  • b. result of such training ordered behavior.
  • E.g. The test-takers showed perfect discipline
    during the examination.
  • c. a branch of knowledge a subject of study.
  • E.g. We are going to take a wide range of
    scientific disciplines in the university.

115
  • 12.     but only cannot but can only
  • e.g. I could not but admit that you were right
    and I was wrong.
  • 13.     dry (quality) plain, without anything
    pleasant or interesting.
  • e.g. They offered no apology, just a dry
    explanation for the delay.
  • 14.    for open discussion Our culture is in
    need of redefining what it means to study.
    (para. 5)
  • 15.     compare discrete with discreet
  • These small companies now have their own discrete
    ( independent, separate) identity.
  • We must be extremely discreet (careful) the
    police suspect something.
  • 16. (fail to) live up to ones principles,
    ones reputation, ones parents expectations,
    etc.

116
  • 17.      well-paved road pave the way for/to
  • e.g. The agreement paved the way for a lasting
    peace.
  • 18.      for discussion or debate To be a
    student is to take risks. (para.6)
  • 19.      paraphrase Children enter school as
    question marks and leaves as periods. (para.6)
  • 20.      relinquish to give up abandon
  • e.g. He had relinquished all hope that she was
    alive.
  • 21. paraphrase and illustrate failures has
    tremendous social stigma. (para.6)

117
  • 22.      compare precedence with precedent
  • precedence the condition of being dealt with
    before other things or of being considered more
    important than other things.
  • e.g. The needs of the community must take
    precedence over individual requirements.
  • precedent earlier decision, case, event, etc.
    that is regarded as an example or rule for what
    comes later
  • e.g. The Queen has broken with precedent
    by sending her children to ordinary schools.
  • 23. ask students to illustrate There is
    nothing quite so satisfying as undergoing a
    difficult process and after long hard work
    discovering the true nature of that process.
    (para.7)

118
  • 24.      be proportion to sth./be in proportion
    to sth.
  • e.g. Payment will be proportional to the amount
    of work done, not to the time spent doing it.
  • 25.     spoon-feed give too much help or
    teaching in a way that does not allow him to
    think for himself
  • e.g. Some teachers are just spoon-feeding their
    students.
  • 26.      initiative
  • a. the ability to make decisions and take action
    without asking for the help or advice of others
  • e.g. A man who lacks the initiative never makes
    a good leader.
  • b. the position of being able to take action or
    influence events
  • e.g. Because of a stupid mistake, we lost the
    initiative in the negotiations.

119
  • 27.      prior coming or planned before
  • e.g. She was unable to attend the meeting
    because of a prior engagement.
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