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Positioning CCCU Campuses in the Third Millennium

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: Maguire Assoc. Last modified by: mduncan Created Date: 8/22/2000 5:41:51 PM Document presentation format: Letter Paper (8.5x11 in) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Positioning CCCU Campuses in the Third Millennium


1
Positioning CCCUCampuses in the Third Millennium
  • CCCU Forum
  • February 9, 2001
  • www.maguireassoc.com

2
Megatrends in Higher Education
  • Drivers of change
  • Shrinking revenues and rising costs
  • Shifts in decision making
  • Impact of workplace trends
  • Growth in adult and traditional markets
  • Strategic pricing and financial aid policies
  • The Web and community

3
Drivers of Change in Higher Education
  • Changing demographics
  • Increasing demand
  • Knowledge explosion
  • Technology
  • Globalization
  • More competitive environment
  • Creation of new enterprises

(Source IBM Campuslink Project Office)
4
Shrinking Revenues and Rising Costs
  • The soaring expense of traditional need-based and
    no-need scholarships
  • Declining financial support from state and
    federal governments
  • The spending needed to bring and keep
    libraries, classrooms, IT, and laboratories up to
    date

5
Shrinking Revenues and Rising Costs
  • The pressures of deferred maintenance
  • The price of faculty expertise
  • The competition for students from for-profit
    institutions, providers of electronic
    education, and corporations own training programs

6
Shrinking Revenues and Rising Costs
  • The cost of technology
  • The rising costs of recruiting students in the
    highly competitive environment

7
Shifts in Decision Making
  • Public policy is moving toward market-driven
    mechanisms because of
  • The increasing power of the consumer
  • Technologys ability to transcend space, time,
    and political boundaries

(Source IBM Campuslink Project Office)
8
Impact of Workplace Trends
  • Retraining is becoming a requirement for
    employees.
  • Technology is a required workforce competency.
  • Telecommuting is becoming a way of life.

(Source IBM Campuslink Project Office)
9
Growth in Adult and Traditional Markets
  • Explosive growth in adult markets
  • 90 million adults (46) participated in one or
    more adult education activities in 1999.
  • Overall participation rate of college graduates
    was more than three times the rate of those
    without a degree.
  • Participation in adult education is six times the
    total higher education enrollment.
  • National Household Education Survey

10
Growth in Adult and Traditional Markets
  • Qualified traditional student growth projections
  • The number of high school graduates in 2000 will
    mirror the early 1980s.
  • By 2004, this population is expected to reach the
    peak levels of the late 1970s.
  • By 2009, the total number of high school
    graduates will be 32 higher than in 1992.

(Source Challenges in College Admissions,
AACRAO, ACT, CB/ETS, NACAC)
11
Growth in Adult and Traditional Markets
  • Qualified traditional student growth projections
  • A record of more than 3.2 million high school
    graduates will peak in 2008-09.
  • Early in this century, more than a third of
    college students will be minority students.
  • By 2020, the Hispanic population will become the
    largest minority group in the United States.

(Source National Center for Education
Statistics)
12
Growth in Adult and Traditional Markets
  • Other notable trends
  • Between 1987 and 1997, the number of men
    enrolling in college rose by 7, while the number
    of women rose by 17.
  • Between 1987 and 1997, the number of male
    full-time graduate students increased by 22,
    compared to 68 for full-time women.

(Source The Chronicle of Higher Education
Almanac, 1998)
13
Growth in Adult and Traditional Markets
  • There are many more small colleges, but most
    students attend the larger institutions.
  • In1997, 40 of all institutions had fewer than
    1,000 students however, these campuses enrolled
    4 of college students.
  • 10 of the campuses enrolled 10,000 or more
    students and accounted for 50 of the total
    college enrollment.

14
Strategic Pricing and Financial Aid Policies
  • Higher education has been (re)embracing merit aid
    programs.
  • Sophisticated financial aid models are being
    employed as revenue generating tools.

15
Strategic Pricing and Financial Aid Policies
  • The linking of institutional values and goals to
    pricing policies is changing the world of
    financial aid.
  • The Princeton policy
  • The domino theory
  • The virtuous circle

16
The Web and Community
  • Distance learning techniques in a residential
    liberal arts environment
  • College constituencies and community using the
    Internet

17
Key Research Findings from the CCCU Membership
Study
18
Goals of the Project
  • Determine how families define value
  • Provide the CCCU with big picture themes
  • Develop strategies for promoting
    under-appreciated yet cherished elements of the
    CCCU mission
  • Uncover profiles of target audiences
  • Gain a longitudinal perspective (1986 vs. 2000)

19
Benchmarks
  • Comparisons of the1986 and 2000 Studies

20
1986 Versus 2000 Comparisons
  • Prospects Year 2000 versus 1986
  • More emphasis on cost
  • More interest in investment value
  • More importance placed on social life
  • Less reliance on general reputation of an
    institution

21
1986 Versus 2000 Comparisons
  • Inquirers Year 2000 versus 1986
  • More emphasis on monetary issues
  • More importance placed on social life and
    location
  • More interest in the integration of faith and
    learning
  • Less confidence in receiving financial aid from
    CCCU institutions

22
1986 Versus 2000 Comparisons
  • Accepted students Year 2000 versus 1986
  • More importance on monetary issues, social life,
    location, and the integration for faith and
    learning
  • Less interest in preparation for graduate school
    and quality of faculty and facilities
  • Less interest in diversity
  • Less confidence in receiving financial aid from
    CCCU institutions

23
(No Transcript)
24
1986 Versus 2000 Comparisons
  • Slight increase in CCCU visibility, but overall
    familiarity still low
  • Gains in reputation for preparing students for
    graduate school and careers, but not as much in
    overall academic reputation
  • Rise in concerns about closed-mindedness

25
Familiarity with Christian Liberal Arts Colleges
and Universities (1986 vs. 2000)
(Totally Familiar) (Not at All
Familiar)
26
Research Highlights
  • Year 2000 Membership Study

27
(No Transcript)
28
The college search is starting earlier for
families.
29
Timing of College Search (2000)
30
The use and influence of the Web represents a
major change in market behavior.
31
Use of Source
32
How the Internet is Used
  • Use and influence of Web sites
  • Reliance from prospect to enrollment stages of
    the college search
  • Implications for content
  • Implications for investment
  • Growing interest in email and chat rooms
  • Need to develop electronic recruitment plans
  • Call to reassess institutional policy on outside
    access to information and people

33
Public universities are major competitorsof the
CCCU.
34
First-Choice Schools (2000 Prospects)
  • Florida State University, FL (3)
  • University of California, Los Angeles, CA (2)
  • University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (2)
  • University of Florida, FL (1)
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
    (1)
  • Texas AM University, TX (1)
  • University of Texas, Austin, TX (1)

35
Positioning Strategies
  • Advantages of Christian mission and smaller size
  • Opportunities for total student development
  • Character development
  • Spiritual development
  • Personal growth in a values-based environment
  • Faculty/student rapport
  • Mentoring

36
The phrase liberal arts is not helpful in
clarifying image or communicating value.
37
Understanding the Liberal Arts
  • Families do not fully understand its meaning.
  • The connection between the liberal arts and
    preparation for careers is not strong.
  • The ability to give impressions of a Christian
    college or university was greatly reduced when
    the phrase liberal arts was added.

38
The Christian mission plays a major role in the
college decision-making process.
39
Admissions Funnel Important College
Characteristics (2000)
Prospect--gtInquirer
The 6 Christian Variables Liberal Arts
Education Geographic Location Close Contact with
Faculty in and out of Class Character
Development
Prospect
Inquirer
Inquirer--gtApplicant (Accepted)
Non- Matriculant
5 of the 6 Christian Variables (not Church
Affiliation of Institution)
Non-Matriculant--gtMatriculant
Matriculant
The 6 Christian Variables Social Life
(Residence Life, Extracurricular Activities,
etc.) Character Development
Items listed are significantly more important
between stages, moving DOWN the admissions
funnel.
40
COUNCIL FOR CHRISTIAN COLLEGES UNIVERSITIES
Chaid Analysis CCCU Distinguishing Inquirers and
Applicants (Admitted Students) Based on
Importance of Characteristics
TOTAL
62.68
n1329
Integration of the Christian faith and learning
1
2,3
4
5
32.47
46.13
61.74
75.74
n77
n349
n264
n639
Academic facilities (quality of library, labs,
computer center, etc.)
Preparation for graduate/ professional school
Character development
Diverse student body
1-3
4,5
1-3
4,5
1,2
3,4
5
1-3
4
5
48.57
19.05
66.15
34.25
80.70
61.80
24.14
91.05
74.92
57.53
n35
n42
n130
n219
n57
n178
n29
n190
n303
n146
Value of education
Christian service opportunities
Liberal arts education
Diverse student body
Quality of major
Quality of major
1-3
4,5
1,2
3-5
1-4
5
1-3
4,5
1-3
4,5
1-4
5
96.15
58.65
53.85
30.00
68.79
35.14
98.44
87.30
81.62
64.41
82.61
46.00
n26
n104
n39
n180
n141
n37
n64
n126
n185
n118
n46
n100
41
Positive and Negative Images of a Christian
Education
  • Quality-of-life issues emerged often
  • Good atmosphere
  • Good environment
  • Nice/friendly/caring people
  • Values/morals
  • Christian fellowship
  • Christian atmosphere

42
Positive and Negative Images of a Christian
Education
  • Top negative mentions
  • Too small
  • Too sheltered
  • Too protected
  • Closed-minded
  • Strict
  • Expensive

43
(No Transcript)
44
(No Transcript)
45
Understanding of a Christian campus is an
underdeveloped building block of the Christian
educational experience.
46
Integration of Faith and Living
  • Prospective students are focused on rules and
    regulations.
  • Students have a siloed image of campus life
  • Service learning
  • Social life
  • Community experience

47
Prospective students have concerns about the
relationship between the Christian influence and
intellectual life.
48
Integration of Faith and Learning
  • Concerns voiced about closed-mindedness
  • References to academic quality missing from
    first-word responses
  • Concerns about restrictions on academic breadth
    and content
  • Students priority of advancing personal academic
    agenda
  • Appeal of the freedom of intellectual discourse
    and growth from within

49
Academic excellence is intertwined with
preparation for the future.
50
Academic Quality and Future Orientation
  • Prospective students for the CCCU identify their
    top priorities as
  • Educational value
  • Preparation for future careers
  • Quality of a specific major
  • Quality of faculty
  • Availability of financial aid
  • Employment opportunities after graduation
  • Quality of academic facilities

51
(No Transcript)
52
Parents are more involved in the college search
in the CCCU market.
53
Parents Influence in Choice of
College/University (2000)
(Very Influential) (Not at All
Influential)
54
(No Transcript)
55
The Parent Perspective
  • In their own words, parents placed substantial
    weight on practical outcomes, such as
  • Employment opportunities after graduation
  • Preparation for careers

56
The value proposition for CCCU schools should
include messages about tangible outcomes and
character development.
57
Value Proposition
  • Every institution should prepare a distinctive
    value proposition.
  • Cost Reverse tendency to think about money
    issues in terms of sticker price rather than net
    cost.
  • Value Students and parents are interested in
    return on investment.
  • First jobs, graduate school acceptances
  • Development of the whole person

58
Educational Value
  • Integrated definition for prospects
  • Closely tied with the importance of preparation
    for future careers and character development
  • Integrated definition of value for inquirers
  • Preparation for future careers
  • Character development
  • Exposure to different cultures on campus and in
    off-campus programs

59
Educational Value
  • Integrated definition of value for accepted
    students
  • Career opportunities
  • Quality of major
  • Academic reputation
  • Preparation for graduate school
  • Academic facilities
  • Quality of faculty
  • Character development

60
Hallmark Themes
  • Academic Quality A high-quality education in a
    secular world.
  • Christian-centered Community A close-knit,
    Christian community that emphasizes character
    development and spiritual growth.
  • Future Orientation Preparation for life as well
    as a living.
  • Financial Investment The value proposition.

61
Academic Quality A high-quality education in a
secular world.
  • Introduces the Christian focus
  • Positions against public and private secular
    universities
  • Acknowledges concerns about invasion of
    voiceless/faceless world
  • Sets the stage for conveying freedom of
    intellectual inquiry as well as the integration
    of faith and learning

62
Christian-centered Community A close-knit,
Christian community that emphasizes character
development and spiritual growth.
  • Highlight character development
  • Distinguishes spiritual growth opportunities
  • Enhances appreciation for value
  • Develops understanding of integration of faith
    and living

63
Future Orientation Preparation for life as well
as a living.
  • Addresses interest in careers
  • Advances concept of development of the whole
    person
  • Provides foundation for moral and spiritual
    lifestyle
  • Raises the bar for definition of success

64
Financial Investment The value proposition.
  • Calls for the creation of a succinct statement at
    the Council and member institution levels
  • Fold in essential elements of the first three
    hallmark themes
  • Write to a parent audience
  • Connect to cost discussions and copy at all times

65
Maguire Associates, Inc.
  • The Art of Research
  • The Science of Communications

135 South Road Bedford, Massachusetts
01730 781-280-2900 Contact Dr. John Maguire,
Chairman jmaguire_at_maguireassoc.com
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