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IEP Training Module: Developing IEPs to Improve Student Performance

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Title: IEP Training Module: Developing IEPs to Improve Student Performance


1
IEP Training ModuleDeveloping IEPs to Improve
Student Performance
  • Developed by the Kentucky Special Education
    Cooperative Network

2
Focus Questions
  • How do we improve the performance of students
    with disabilities?
  • How do we link the curricular documents and IEPs
    so they work together?
  • How will we meet the childs other educational
    needs that result from the disability?
  • How will we teach the goals/benchmarks/objectives?
  • How can we use student data to guide
    instructional decision-making?

3
Purpose of the Training
  • Provide time for developing a results-driven IEP
  • Provide a process for developing IEPs
  • Provide an opportunity to practice developing
    IEPs
  • Provide a connection between the General
    Curriculum, the IEP, and instructional planning

4
Activity One
I. E. P.
5
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6
Nothing worth learning is learned quickly, except
parachuting. David S. Brown
7
(No Transcript)
8
KY Learner GoalsSchools shall develop their
students ability to
KY School Goals Schools shall
  • Have high expectations for all students
  • Develop student ability to apply KY Learner Goals
  • Increase student rate of school attendance
  • Reduce student dropout retention rates
  • Reduce physical mental health barriers to
    learning
  • Be measured on the proportion of students who
    make a successful transition to work,
    postsecondary education the military
  • Use basic communication and mathematics skills
  • Apply core concepts and principles from content
    areas
  • Become self sufficient individuals
  • Become responsible group members
  • Think and solve problems in a variety of
    situations
  • Connect and integrate experiences and new
    knowledge
  • KRS 158.6451, 707 KAR 1290 4,
  • 704 KAR 3303

9
Kentucky Learner Goals
  • 1. Use basic communication and mathematics skills
  • 2. Apply core concepts and principles from
    content areas
  • 3. Become self-sufficient individuals
  • 4. Become responsible group members
  • 5. Think and solve problems in a variety of
    situations
  • 6. Connect and integrate experiences and new
    knowledge

10
Academic Expectations
  • Example Learner Goal 1
  • 1.1 Students use reference tools to find the
    information they need to meet specific demands,
    explore interests, or solve specific problems.
  • Example Learner Goal 2
  • 2.7 Students understand number concepts and use
    numbers appropriately and accurately.

11
Program of Studies (POS)(Kentuckys Mandated
Curriculum)
  • Outlines the minimum content required for all
    students before graduating
  • Provides all students with common content and
    opportunities to learn at high levels
  • Serves as the basis for establishing and revising
    curriculum at the local level

12
Core Content for Assessment4.1
  • Is essential for all students to know
  • Is included in state assessment
  • Addresses the following content areas
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Math
  • Practical Living/Vocational Studies
  • Arts and Humanities

13
Character Education
  • This document offers additional instructional
    tools for teaching
  • altruism, citizenship, courtesy, honesty, human
    worth, justice, knowledge, respect,
    responsibility, and self-discipline.

14
(No Transcript)
15
General Education Curriculum
IEP
Learner Goals
LRE
Academic Expectations
Program of Studies
IEP Services
Core Content
Measurable Goals, Benchmarks/STO
Aligned District Curriculum
Standards-Based Instructional Units
Present Levels Affect Statement
Lesson Plan
Transition
Progress Monitoring Data
Special Considerations
Design Down-Deliver Up Model
16
Purpose of the IEP
  • To support educational performance

707 KAR 1320 5 (7)(b)1 2 34 CFR 300.320 (a)
17
The IEP supports educational performance by
  • Providing access to the general curriculum.
  • Ensuring the student will make progress in the
    general curriculum.
  • Addressing the students other unique educational
    needs.
  • Preparing the student for further education,
    employment, and independent living, if needed.

707 KAR 1320 5 (7)(b)1 2 34 CFR
300.320(a)(2)(A)
18
Who Contributes to the IEP?
  • General and special educators
  • Parents
  • Students, when appropriate
  • Evaluation specialists
  • Related service providers

19

IEP Development is a PROCESS not an event!
Special Factors
Transition
Student Performance Data
Remember the flow
Reporting Progress
Present Levels
Annual Goals Benchmarks Short Term Objectives
IEP Services
20
Purpose of Student Performance Data
  • Write the IEP
  • Plan instruction
  • Evaluate and report progress
  • Determine the effectiveness of instructional
    services
  • Determine if the child continues to need SDI
    and/or related services
  • Revise the IEP
  • Document implementation of the IEP

21
Student Performance Data Sources
  • pre-referral intervention results
  • work samples (e.g., portfolios, daily
    assignments, etc.)
  • behavioral observations
  • results of standardized individual assessments
  • culminating products/projects
  • state and district-wide assessment results
  • progress monitoring data (including baseline
    data)
  • interviews
  • classroom tests
  • formal/informal assessment
  • journal writing
  • ILP (IGP)
  • student parent surveys

22
IEP DEVELOPMENT CONSIDERATIONS
  • The ARC shall consider in the development of an
    IEP
  • the strengths of the child
  • the concerns of the parents for enhancing the
    education of their child
  • the results of the initial or most recent
    evaluation of the child
  • the academic, developmental, and functional needs
    of the child and
  • as appropriate, the results of the childs
    performance on any general state or district-wide
    assessment programs.

707 KAR 1320 5 (1) 34 CFR 300.324 (a)(1)
23
Present Levels Affect Statement
Transition
Special Considerations
Goals, Benchmarks/ Objectives
Progress Reporting
Student Performance Data
SDI and Related Services
Progress Monitoring
Daily Lesson Plans
Participation in General Ed
Instructional Planning
24
IEP Development Process
  • Consideration of Special Factors
  • Post-secondary Transition
  • Present Level of Academic Achievement and
    Functional Performance
  • Annual Goals, Benchmarks Objectives
  • IEP Services
  • Participation

25

IEP Development is a PROCESS not an event!
Special Factors
Transition
Student Performance Data
Remember the flow
Reporting Progress
Present Levels
Annual Goals Benchmarks Short Term Objectives
IEP Services
26
Consideration of Special Factors
  • Behavior Concerns
  • Limited English Proficiency
  • Blind or Visually Impaired
  • Communication Needs
  • Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • Assistive Technology
  • 707 KAR 1320 5 (2)
  • 34 CFR 300.324 (a)(2)

27
Anita
28

IEP Development is a PROCESS not an event!
Special Factors
Transition
Student Performance Data
Remember the flow
Reporting Progress
Present Levels
Annual Goals Benchmarks Short Term Objectives
IEP Services
29
Post-Secondary Transition Needs
  • In the childs eighth grade year or when the
    child has reached age 14 (or younger if
    determined appropriate) the IEP includes a
    statement of transition service needs
  • The statement is updated annually
  • Focuses on the childs course
  • of study

707 KAR 1320 7 (1) 34 CFR 300.320 (b)(2)
30
Measurable Postsecondary Goals
  • Beginning no later than the first IEP to be in
    effect when the child is 16, the IEP includes
    appropriate measurable postsecondary goals
  • Postsecondary goals are updated annually
  • Postsecondary goals are based upon age
    appropriate transition assessment related to 1)
    training/education, 2) employment, and, where
    appropriate, 3) independent living skills
  • IEP includes the transition services (including
    courses of study) needed to assist the child in
    reaching those postsecondary goals
  • IEP includes annual goals that will reasonably
    enable the student to reach the postsecondary
    goals.
  • 707 KAR 1320 7 (2)
  • 34 CFR 300.320 (6) (1)

31
Individual Learning Plan or Individual
Graduation Plan?
32
Transfer of Rights
  • Beginning at least one year before the age of
    majority
  • Statement that the student and their parents have
    been informed of the rights that will transfer to
    the student upon reaching the age of majority
  • Upon the student reaching the age of majority,
    parents must continue to receive the Conference
    Summary

707 KAR 1320 6 (4) 707 KAR 1320 5 (14) CFR
320 (c)
33
Transition Tips
  • The Transition needs of the student must be
    discussed first
  • Have the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) at all
    ARC meetings
  • Update the transition surveys annually (parent
    and student)
  • Review other transition assessments

34
Anita
35
Write Your Own
  • Transition Needs Statement
  • Post-Secondary Goal
  • Transition Services (including statement of
    interagency linkages and responsibilities)

36
Other Transition Considerations
  • Part C (Preschool) to Part B (IDEA)
  • Different levels (preschool elementary
    elementary middle middle high)
  • Different building (physical access issues,
    building layout)
  • Different program (pull-out setting to general ed
    setting)

37

IEP Development is a PROCESS not an event!
Special Factors
Transition
Student Performance Data
Remember the flow
Reporting Progress
Present Levels
Annual Goals Benchmarks Short Term Objectives
IEP Services
38
Let the Rabbits Run A Parable
39
Present Level of Academic Achievement and
Functional Performance
  • A statement of the childs present levels of
    academic achievement and functional performance,
    including
  • How the childs disability affects the childs
    involvement and progress in the general
    curriculum as provided in the Kentucky POS or
  • For preschool children, as appropriate, how the
    disability affects the childs participation in
    appropriate activities.
  • 707 KAR 1320 5 (7)(a)
  • 34 CFR 320 (a)(1)

40
Academic Achievement and Functional Performance
Areas to Consider
  • Communication
  • Academic Performance
  • Social and Emotional
  • General Intelligence
  • Health, Vision, Hearing, and Motor
  • Transition to Post-Secondary
  • Functional Vision/Learning Media Assessment

707 KAR 1320 5 (2) (c) 707 KAR 1320 7 (1) 707
KAR 1300 4 (10) 34 CFR 300.304 (c) (4)
41
Student Performance Data
Strengthen Instructional Planning
Present Levels
Measurable Goals
42
Activity
  • What information would help the ARC develop the
    Present Levels?
  • What are some specific sources for this
    information?

43
Sources of InformationPresent Levels of Academic
Achievement and Functional Performance may
include information collected about the child
including
  • pre-referral intervention results
  • work samples (e.g., portfolios, daily assignments
    etc.)
  • behavioral observations
  • results of standardized individualized
    assessments
  • culminating products/projects
  • state and district-wide assessment results
  • progress monitoring data (including baseline
    data)
  • interviews
  • classroom tests
  • formal/informal assessment
  • journal writing
  • ILP (IGP)
  • student parent surveys

44
Initial Present Levels of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
Classroom Performance Data
State Assessment
District Assessment

Individual Assessment Report
Data from referral information
45
Annual Present Levels of Academic Achievement
and Functional Performance
Individual Assessment Report
State Assessment
District Assessment
Progress Monitoring Data toward IEP Goals
46
How do you Write the Present Levels?
47
Present Levels Planning Process
  • The ARC must know
  • What skills the student has and what content the
    student knows (student performance data)
  • What students in this grade are expected to know
    and do (from the curricular documents)
  • What needs the student has that are not addressed
    through the curricular documents

48
Steps to Write the Present Levels
  1. Review the students performance information to
    plot where the student is in the general
    curriculum
  2. Locate the students grade level in the Program
    of Studies or district curriculum
  3. Determine the skills and content the student
    needs to learn from the curriculum
  4. Determine what the student needs to learn that is
    not addressed through the curricular documents
    (to address the childs other needs)

49
How the disability affects the childs
involvement and progress in the general
curriculum
  • 707 KAR 1320 5 (7)(a)
  • 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(1)(i)

50
Affect on Involvement and Progress in the General
Curriculum
  • Based on the statements in the Present Level
  • What are the students challenges related to the
    disability?
  • How will the challenges related to the
    disability affect day-to-day life?

51
Present Level Statement
  • Grade 4 (Student) uses phonetic clues to
    pronounce one syllable words. He has a sight
    word vocabulary of approximately 150 words,
    produces rhyming words, and uses context clues to
    understand text. He learns best when words are
    paired with visual cues and when information is
    highlighted. He is unable to use text features
    and organizational patterns to distinguish the
    difference between reading for information and
    reading for enjoyment. He cannot interpret the
    authors intent or opinions, or use details to
    support the authors opinions.

52
Affect Statement
  • (Students) inability to read high-frequency/grade
    appropriate words affects his performance in
    language arts and content areas when given
    grade-level reading materials, written
    directions, completing homework assignments,
    reading for information, answering open response
    requests, and responding to on-demand writing
    tasks.

53
  • (Students) inability to read high-frequency/grade
    appropriate words affects his performance in
    language arts and content areas when given
    grade-level reading materials, written
    directions, completing homework assignments,
    reading for information, answering open response
    requests, and responding to on-demand writing
    tasks.

54
  • (Students) inability to read high-frequency/grade
    appropriate words affects his performance in
    language arts and content areas when given
    grade-level reading materials, written
    directions, completing homework assignments,
    reading for information, answering open response
    requests, and responding to on-demand writing
    tasks.

55
Present Level Statement
  • (Student) demonstrates above average cognitive
    abilities and below average academic abilities.
    In timed situations, she refuses to complete the
    work and tries to leave class, curses, and will
    bite and kick at the adult, resulting in
    interruptions of learning experiences for herself
    and others. She is more successful at
    interacting with younger students. She enjoys
    working on the computer, games involving
    individual effort, and physical education class.

56
Affect Statement
  • (Students) loss of time in the learning
    environment and unwillingness to complete
    assignments have resulted in the students
    performing below same age peers, and affects her
    ability to progress in the general education
    curriculum by working cooperatively in groups,
    participating in class discussions, completing
    timed assignments, accepting redirection, and
    complying with adult directions.

57
  • (Students) loss of time in the learning
    environment and unwillingness to complete
    assignments have resulted in the students
    performing below same age peers, and affects her
    ability to progress in the general education
    curriculum by working cooperatively in groups,
    participating in class discussions, completing
    timed assignments, accepting redirection, and
    complying with adult directions.

58
  • (Students) loss of time in the learning
    environment and unwillingness to complete
    assignments have resulted in the students
    performing below same age peers, and affects her
    ability to progress in the general education
    curriculum by working cooperatively in groups,
    participating in class discussions, completing
    timed assignments, accepting redirection, and
    complying with adult directions.

59
Present Level Statement
  • Grade 5 (Student) shows an understanding of place
    value of numbers to 1,000 but cannot read, write,
    and model whole numbers to 100,000,000 can add,
    subtract, and multiply without regrouping, but he
    cannot use the skill of regrouping in these
    operations, and cannot do simple division. He
    can use manipulatives to show ½ and ¼ but he
    cannot compare and apply the sizes of common and
    mixed fractions. He cannot collect, organize, or
    display data, or choose an appropriate way to
    collect and represent data.

60
Affect Statement
  • (Students) difficulty in math affects his
    performance in his ability to organize, collect,
    and interpret information to complete content
    assignments to think, predict, and problem-solve
    in content assignments and real-life situations.

61
Tips for Writing the Present Levels
  • Use information from student performance data
  • Describe what the student can and cannot do
  • Remember to include an affect statement
  • Cite the source of information obtained from
    outside the school (e.g., parent , medical
    information)
  • Use parent-friendly language

62
Anita
63
Write Your Own
  • Present Level of Academic Achievement and
    Functional Performance
  • Affect Statement

64
Prioritizing Student Needs
  • Students strengths and weaknesses
  • Amount of time left in school
  • Skills needed to achieve postsecondary goals
  • Behaviors that appear most modifiable
  • Parent, teacher and student interests and
    concerns

65
Anita
66

IEP Development is a PROCESS not an event!
Special Factors
Transition
Student Performance Data
Remember the flow
Reporting Progress
Present Levels
Annual Goals Benchmarks Short Term Objectives
IEP Services
67
Measurable Annual Goals
  • A statement of measurable annual goals, including
    academic and functional goals and benchmarks or
    short-term objectives, designed to
  • Meet the childs needs that result from the
    childs disability to enable the child to be
    involved in and make progress in the general
    curriculum and
  • Meet each of the childs other educational needs
    that result from the childs disability.

707 KAR 1320 5 (7)(b) 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(2)
68
What is Measurable?
  • Measurable means it must be possible to evaluate
    and document whether the student is making
    progress toward the goal.

69
Measurable Annual Goals
  • Are written to ensure access and enable progress
    in the general curriculum
  • Relate to the needs identified in the Present
    Levels
  • For students age 16 and older, reasonably enable
    the student to reach his/her postsecondary goals
  • Include a method of measurement
  • Describe performance anticipated within
  • ONE year

70
Setting IEP Goals
  • Step A Determine the Skills Needed
  • Step B Determine How Far By When
  • Step C Determine Short-term instructional
    objectives/Benchmarks

71
Goal Setting Example
James has difficulty summarizing a story and
employing sight word vocabulary to make sense of
text. He currently reads 30 wpm at the 3rd grade
level, which is at the 7th percentile. His Rate
of Learning is 0.8 words per minute per week. To
achieve the 25th percentile on grade level James
needs a growth rate of 1.7 words per week. His
difficulty with immediately identifying words in
a passage impact achievement in grade level
content materials.
Present Levels
Identified Need
Improve oral reading fluency
James will read 75 words correct per minute with
less than 5 errors on randomly selected passages
representing grade 2 material for oral reading
fluency as measured by curriculum probes.
Proposed Annual Goal
72
Sample Goals and Short Term Objectives for
Preschool Age Student With Significant
Disabilities (All Domains- cognitive,
personal/social adaptive, communication, (non
verbal), motor (Likely FMD)
  • Goal Marsha will demonstrate general skills
    and strategies of the communication
  • process including non-verbal communication for
    a variety of purposes, as
  • measured by her increased
    communicative responses. KECS 1.1
  • STOs/Benchmarks
  • Upon seeing and wanting a particular item, and
    with a picture of that item in reach, Marsha will
    pick up the picture, reach to person holding the
    item, and release the picture into that person's
    hand with at least 80 accuracy across three
    implementers, as measured using a discrete trial
    format. (PECS)
  • Upon seeing and wanting a particular item, and
    with a picture of that item alone on a
    communication book within reach, Marsha will
    remove the picture from the book, go to the
    communicative partner, and give picture to that
    person with at least 80 accuracy across three
    implementers, as measured using a discrete trial
    format. (PECS)
  • Upon seeing and wanting a particular item, and
    with a picture of the item alone on a
    communication book, Marsha will go to the book,
    remove the picture, go to communicative partner,
    and give picture to the partner with at least 80
    accuracy across three implementers, as measured
    using a discrete trial format. (PECS)
  • Upon seeing and wanting a particular item and
    with the communication book available with
    corresponding picture and picture of a distracter
    item on it, Marsha will request that item by
    giving communicative partner the correct picture
    with at least 80 accuracy across three
    implementers, as measured using a discrete trial
    format . (PECS)

73
Marshas Specially Designed Instruction
  • verbal cues, hand over hand assistance, system
    of least prompts, visual cues, immediate
    reinforcement for correct responses

74
Sample Goals and Short Term Objectives for
Elementary Age Student With Significant
Disabilities (multiple-OHI, FMD)
  • Goal
  • Sherida will demonstrate skills and work habits
    that lead to success in school and work as
    measured by her increased on task behaviors (
    attention to instruction, following directions
    and task completion) as assessed by performance
    based on criteria established within an on task
    behavior scoring guide. A.E. 2.37
  • STOs and Benchmarks
  • Sherida will attend to 1-1 instruction in a
    variety of structured settings and increase the
    number of instructional tasks she completes
    during given work time (i.e. 5 minutes on task,
    increasing by 1 minute intervals as her attention
    to tasks increases/ begin with 2 tasks at a time
    and increase by 1 as appropriate), as measured
    using an on task behavior scoring guide.
  • Sherida will demonstrate independent work habits
    by increasing the amount of familiar, structured
    tasks she completes across instructional
    settings, as measured using an on task behavior
    scoring guide.
  • Sherida will participate in a variety of small
    group activities with increased independence by
    orienting to adult directive, demonstrating joint
    attention to task upon request, and completing
    pre-taught instructional activity with decreasing
    levels of prompting, as measured using an on task
    behavior scoring guide.
  • Sherida will participate in a variety of large
    group activities with increased independence by
    orienting to an adult directive, demonstrating
    joint attention to task upon request, and
    completing pre-taught instructional activity with
    assistance as needed as measured using an on task
    behavior scoring guide.

75
Sheridas Specially Designed Instruction
  • Visual cues, visual work system, first___,
    then___ visual support, system of least
    prompts/cueing, modeling, guided practice, direct
    instruction, peer support, frequent reinforcement
    for appropriate attention and completion of tasks

76
Sample Goals and Short Term Objectives for Middle
School Student With Significant Disabilities
(Autism-moderate)
  • Goal Tiffany will demonstrate her ability to
    become a responsible member of a group at home or
    in the community as measured by her increased use
    of interpersonal skills to initiate various
    social interactions across settings, with
    different people, as assessed by interpersonal
    skills checklist. (A.E. 4, 4.1)
  • STOs and Benchmarks
  • Tiffany will demonstrate her ability to use
    effective interpersonal skills by initiating or
    responding to a greeting from a peer or adult,
    on 4 out of 5 occasions across a 4 week period,
    as assessed using an interpersonal skills
    checklist.
  • Tiffany will demonstrate her ability to use
    effective interpersonal skills by initiating a
    simple conversation (2 exchanges) with a familiar
    peer or adult on a topic of her choice with no
    more than 2 prompt/cues, on 4 out of 5 occasions
    for 4 weeks, across a variety of settings, as
    assessed using an interpersonal skills checklist.
  • Tiffany will maintain conversation with familiar
    peer or adult on preferred topic for a minimum of
    4 exchanges with no more than 2 prompts/cues, on
    4 out of 5 occasions for 4 weeks, across a
    variety of settings, as assessed using an
    interpersonal skills checklist.
  • Tiffany will terminate a conversation
    appropriately by offering an age appropriate
    salutation (i.e. bye, goodbye, see you later, see
    ya, etc.) to peer or adult across a variety of
    settings, as assessed using an interpersonal
    skills checklist.

77
Tiffanys Specially Designed Instruction
  • positive practice across social settings, peer
    modeling of appropriate conversational skills,
    simplified verbiage, prior teaching/preparation
    of topic with rehearsal, video self modeling as
    applicable, modeling, system of least
    prompts/cues, scripting, social stories, comic
    book conversations, direct social skills
    instruction

78
Sample Goals and Short Term Objectives for High
School Student With Significant Disabilities
(Multiple-OHI medically fragile, FMD)
  • Goal
  • Cheryl will use the verbal, reading and writing
    processes to communicate ideas and information
    for a variety of purposes, as measured by
    performance on criteria established on reading
    running record checklist. (POS-LA)
  • STOs and Benchmarks
  • Cheryl will use combinations of pictures,
    symbols, letters and words to convey meaning as
    she constructs sentences with increasing
    complexity across various content areas.
  • Cheryl will interpret specialized vocabulary
    (words and terms specific to understanding the
    content) found in practical workplace passages
    including recipes, household labels, newspapers,
    forms, applications, etc.)
  • Cheryl will use correct and appropriate spelling,
    punctuation grammar and capitalization, as she
    constructs sentences or sentences she is given to
    edit
  • Cheryl will write transactive pieces (writing
    produced for authentic purposes and audiences)
    that demonstrate self-sufficiency and practical
    living skills observed in the practical workplace
    (i.e. forms, applications, letters resume, etc.)
  • Given weekly vocabulary words from various
    content areas that are practicably applicable,
    Cheryl will be able to match the appropriate
    words to the correct picture and identify at
    least one practical application for each using
    words, pictures, photos etc.

79
Cheryls Specially Designed Instruction
  • One to one instruction, pictorial graphic
    organizers, pictures, objects, pictorial word
    processor (fading physical and verbal prompts,
    pictorially supported reference guides, community
    referenced activities, modeling, system of least
    prompts, keyboarding instruction including use of
    spell check, and other editing devices, guided
    practice,

80
Sample Goals and Short Term Objectives for High
School Student With Significant Disabilities (
Multiple-low FMD, physical, OHI, VI)
  • Goal
  • David will identify and apply a variety of
    appropriate reading strategies to make sense of a
    various print and non print texts as assessed by
    checklist. POS-LA
  • Objectives
  • David will recognize from two, through eye gaze
    or switches, familiar vocabulary to make sense of
    texts.
  • Using eye gaze or switches, David will make
    choices from two and interpret pictures and terms
    specific to understanding various content found
    in practical settings including recipes,
    household labels, newspapers, form, applications,
    other texts, etc.

81
Davids Specially Designed Instruction
  • One to one instruction, print enlarged to 24 pt.
    font, presentation of materials at a proper
    height and distance with head positioned
    correctly, physical assist as needed, touch
    response, switches as appropriate, Yes/No boards
    (pictorial), pictorial supports for choices

82
Goal Setting Example
James will read 75 words correct per minute with
less than 5 errors on randomly selected passages
representing grade 2 material for oral reading
fluency as measured by curriculum probes.
Proposed Goal
James current Rate of Learning 0.8 wpm Growth
Needed to catch up to grade level 1.7 wpm Growth
Level for typical 3rd Graders 0.9 wpm Growth
Rate Needed at 2nd Grade Goal Level 1.1
wpm Growth Level for typical 2nd Graders 1.0
Levels
Realistic Goal?
Yes
83
Goal Setting Example
Mark can produce all letters using cursive and
write all numbers. He can form most words common
to his fifth grade curriculum. However it takes
him up to 4 times as long to complete each word
as it does his peers. The legibility of his
handwriting deteriorates with any written work
over three minutes. He cannot communicate ideas
legibly if more than 2 or 3 sentences of 5 or 6
words are required. When provided a scribe, tape
recorder, personal recorder or calculator with a
printer, Mark can communicate ideas and complete
math assignments within the lower performance
range of classmates. In computer class, 95 of
classmates achieved basic skill levels related to
using a computer. Mark uses his right hand only
for keyboarding skills, uses the hunt and peck
method, and can only produce an average speed of
3 wpm. The average for classmates is 15 wpm with
a range from 10-20 wpm, using both hands. He does
not use the keyboard for accurate spacing,
punctuation, and capitalization, although he can
accurately state where to use the concepts.
Present Levels
Identified Need
Practical Handwriting Use of technology for
written expression
Mark will use a computer to effectively
communicate ideas and information when written
assignments or products are required for any
class, within the timeframe set for all students,
and will demonstrate planning, translating and
reviewing as recorded by classroom teachers using
a scoring rubric..
Proposed Annual Goal
84
Goal Setting Example
By the end of the year, Mark will use a computer
to effectively communicate ideas and information
when written assignments or products are required
for any class, within the timeframe set for all
students, and will demonstrate planning,
translating, and reviewing work, as recorded by
classroom teachers using a scoring rubric.
Proposed Goal
1. By October, Mark will be fluent in the use of
the beginning keystrokes in the home row, typing
10 error free words per minute, using both hands,
as observed and recorded by staff on 5 occasions
over a 2-week period. 2. By March, Mark will be
fluent in the use of advanced and basic
keystrokes, typing 10 error free words per
minute, using both hands, as observed and
recorded by staff on 5 occasions over a 2-week
period.
Benchmark/STOs
Realistic Goal with Benchmark/STOs?
Yes
85
Reporting to Parents
  • Parents must be informed of
  • How progress toward annual goals is measured
  • When periodic progress reports will be provided

707 KAR 1320 5 (13)(a-b) 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(3)
86
How can we Write Measurable Goals that Access the
General Curriculum?
Access to the General Curriculum
Measurable Goal
Whats the missing link?
87
How can we Write Measurable Goals that Access the
General Curriculum?
Curriculum Documents!!
Measurable Goal
Access to the General Curriculum
88
Measurable GoalsHow Do We Know?
89
Measurable GoalAnita will identify and apply a
variety of appropriate reading strategies to make
sense of a variety of print and non-print texts
as demonstrated by curriculum based probes,
annotated recordings, and work samples.
  • Benchmarks
  • Anita will analyze the content or make
    connections as it applies to students lives and
    real world issues
  • Anita will apply word recognition strategies to
    determine pronunciations
  • Anita will use text features and visual
    information (ex., maps, charts, graphs, time
    lines, visual organizers) to understand text
  • Anita will explain how the use of text features
    (ex., illustrations) enhances the readers
    understanding of a passage
  • Presented an informational text, Anita will
    orally summarize the meaning of the text with 90
    accuracy during 3 out of 4 consecutive trials

90
Student Performance Data
Strengthen Instructional Planning
Present Levels
Measurable Goals
91
Steps to Progress Monitoring
  1. Identify the target behavior in the annual goal,
    benchmark/short term objective.
  2. Select the method of measurement for monitoring
    student progress.
  3. Implement the IEP.
  4. Collect the data.
  5. Analyze the data.
  6. Report data.

92
Methods of Measurement
  • Scoring guide
  • - holistic - conventional
  • - checklist - combination
  • Curriculum-based measurement
  • - teacher made tests - error analysis
  • - running record - task analysis
  • - annotations (marker papers)
  • Teacher observations
  • -anecdotal -intentional

93
Remember the flow
Develop the Present Level including the Affect
Statement
Prioritize Needs related to the childs disability
Develop Annual Goals
Add methods to make measurable
94
Remember the flow
Johnny can use visual strategies to understand
words within a text. He can apply phonetic
principles by sounding out letters within a word.
Johnnys difficulty with identifying words
immediately within a passage will affect reading
grade level content...
Present Levels
Identified Need
Increase fluency through word identification.
Annual Goal
AE 1.2 Johnny will make sense of a variety of
materials he reads
Methods of Measurement
as measured by the increased number of words read
within a reading passage.
95
Remember the flow
Present Levels
Suzie can add, subtract, and multiply without
regrouping, but she cannot use the skill of
regrouping in these operations, and cannot do
simple division.
Identified Need
To learn skills to use regroup when performing
math activities.
Annual Goal
AE 2.7 Suzie will increase her ability to
understand number concepts and use numbers
appropriately and accurately
Methods of Measurement
as measured by classroom based tests and
curriculum probes.
96
Remember the flow
Verbally and in writing, Anitas ideas are
expressed by completing simple sentences due to
her limited vocabulary. Anita lacks the skills
for interviewing, writing resumes, and completing
applications that will be required for post
secondary training or placement.
Present Levels
To develop skills for transitional writing.
Identified Need
AE 2.38 Anita will demonstrate skills such as
interviewing, writing resumes, and completing
applications that are needed to get a job
Annual Goal
Methods of Measurement
as measured by performance based on criteria
established within rubrics to assess her job
portfolio and interviewing skills.
97
Tips for Writing Annual Goals
  • Link to vocabulary from the Curricular Documents
  • Consider adding demonstrators as demonstrated
    by or as evidenced by to make it measurable
    (seen, heard, measured, counted)
  • Determine the method of evaluation that will
    assist in documenting how the students progress
    will be measured and reported as related to the
    goal
  • Consider naturally occurring opportunities for
    evaluation
  • Connect the goal (s) back to the needs and
    performance information in the Present Levels
  • Consider the childs other educational needs that
    relate to the disability

98
Addressing Other Educational Needs that Relate to
the Disability
Tiffany is quiet, withdrawn and only speaks to
peers when spoken to, except within her small
circle of friends. In social and classroom
settings Tiffany displays what might be perceived
as inappropriate behaviors. When in conversation
with others the direction of her gaze is down
which gives the appearance she is not attending
to conversation. Her withdrawn behaviors and
body language will affect relationships at home,
school or in the community and her personal
safety.
Present Levels
Identified Need
To develop social interaction skills
Tiffany will demonstrate conversation skills such
as a relaxed but erect body stance, holding her
head upright, facing the speaker, and using
nonverbal cues such as nodding and tracking the
voice to acknowledge conversation.
Annual Goal
Methods of Measurement
as measured by performance based on criteria
established within rubrics to assess social
interaction skills.
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99
Anita
100
Write Your Own
  • Annual Measurable Goal
  • Method of Measurement

101
Benchmarks and Short Term Objectives
  • milestones for measuring progress
  • written for each annual goal

102
Short Term Objectives
  • Audience
  • Behavior
  • Circumstances
  • Degree
  • Evaluation

103
By the end of the second grading period, Jake
will provide a written interpretation of the
authors intent for a minimum of 8 personally
chosen reading selections. He will include the
written interpretive pieces in a working
portfolio and the teacher will evaluate the
pieces using a scoring guide.
  • Audience
  • Behavior
  • Circumstances
  • How/with what
  • Where
  • When
  • Degree
  • Target Score, Percent, Length of Time
  • Number of times
  • Evaluation
  • Documentation

104
Jake will provide a written interpretation of the
authors intent for personally chosen reading
selections.
  • Audience
  • Behavior
  • Circumstances
  • How/with what
  • Where
  • When
  • Degree
  • Target Score, Percent, Length of Time
  • Number of times
  • Evaluation
  • Documentation

105
Benchmarks/Short Term Objectives
  • One Way
  • By October, when presented with appropriate
    materials, John will use a picture board to relay
    three messages daily with 80 accuracy as
    indicated in staff observations and recorded by
    the teacher.
  • Another Way
  • John will sequence pictures to relay a message or
    retell a story.

106
Benchmark STO Tips
  • Refer to the Annual Goals for specific skills,
    both academic and functional skills
  • Use curricular documents to guide the
    benchmark/STO
  • Use appropriate grade level expectations
  • Ensure the benchmark/STO matches the goal

107
Johnny
  • Present Level Johnny can use visual strategies
    to understand words within a text. He can apply
    phonetic principles by sounding out letters
    within a word. Johnnys difficulty with
    identifying words immediately within a passage
    will affect reading grade level content...
  • Annual Goal AE 1.2 Johnny will make sense of a
    variety of materials he reads as measured by the
    increased number of words read within a reading
    passage.
  • Benchmarks
  • 1. Johnny will apply word recognition strategies
    to determine pronunciation of words in a
    passage. (CCA- RD-EP-1.1)
  • Johnny will read high frequency/grade appropriate
    passage with automaticity (immediate recognition)
    (POS).
  • Short Term Objective
  • 1. Given a 100 word reading passage, Johnny will
    read 95 of the words correctly within one minute.

108
Suzie
  • Present Level Suzie can add, subtract, and
    multiply without regrouping, but she cannot use
    the skill of regrouping in these operations, and
    she cannot do simple division.
  • Annual Goal AE 2.7 Suzie will understand number
    concepts and use numbers appropriately and
    accurately as demonstrated by achieving a score
    of 80 on textbook chapter and teacher-made
    tests.
  • Benchmarks
  • 1. Suzie will learn and apply computational
    procedures to add, subtract, multiply, and divide
    whole numbers using basic facts and technology as
    appropriate. (POS 5th grade, Number Operations)
  • 2. Suzie will analyze real-world situations to
    identify the appropriate mathematical operations,
    and will apply operations to solve real-world
    problems by adding, subtracting, multiplying, and
    dividing whole numbers less than 100,000,000.
    (CC MA-05-1.3.1)

109
Anita
  • Present Level Verbally and in writing, Anitas
    ideas are expressed by completing simple
    sentences due to her limited vocabulary. Anita
    lacks the skills for interviewing, writing
    resumes, and completing applications that will be
    required for post secondary training or
    placement.
  • Annual Goal AE 2.38 Anita will demonstrate
    skills such as interviewing, writing resumes, and
    completing applications that are needed to get a
    job as measured by performance based on criteria
    established within rubrics to assess her job
    portfolio and interviewing skills.
  • Benchmarks
  • Anita will apply skills for writing a resume to
    seek a job/career (CCA 4.1 PL-HS-4.3.3).
  • Anita will complete a job application within the
    area of her job/career interest with 90
    accuracy.
  • Anita will demonstrate effective speaking and
    listening skills used in a job interview (ex.,
    friendly greeting, maintain eye contact,
    responding positively) (CCA 4.1 PL-HS-4.3.3).

110
Anita
111
Write Your Own
  • Benchmarks and/or short term objectives

112
Student Performance Data
Strengthen Instructional Planning
Present Levels
Measurable Goals
113
Whats Special about Special Education?
  • IEP services address unique needs
  • Specially-designed instruction
  • Supplementary aids and services
  • Related services
  • Program modifications
  • Supports for school personnel

114
Specially Designed Instruction, Related Services,
Supplementary Aids and Services, Program
Modifications and Supports for School Personnel
  • Services are provided to the child or on behalf
    of the child
  • to advance appropriately toward attaining annual
    goals
  • be involved and progress in the general
    curriculum and to participate in extracurricular
    and other nonacademic activities and
  • to be educated and participate with other
    children with disabilities and nondisabled
    children.
  • 707 KAR 1320 Section 5 (8)
  • 34 CFR 300.320 (a) (4)

115
SDI The Definition
  • Specially-designed instruction (SDI) means
    adapting, as appropriate, the content,
    methodology, or delivery of instruction to
    address the unique needs of the child with a
    disability and to ensure access of the child to
    the general curriculum included in the Program of
    Studies.

707 KAR 1280 1 (58) 34 CFR 300.39 (b)(3)
116
Activity
  • Brainstorm several different forms of specially
    designed instruction.

117
Examples of SDI
Instruction in the use of
  • Text/Screen readers
  • Advanced organizers
  • Signed instruction
  • Word identification strategies
  • Use of talking calculator
  • Manipulatives
  • Oral presentation of printed material
  • Paraphrasing strategies
  • Use of talking calculator
  • Procedural prompts
  • Use of Visual cues
  • Multi-sensory approach to reading
  • Use of Reinforcement strategies

118
Supplementary Aids and Services Are
  • Aids, services, and other supports that are
    provided in regular education classes or other
    education-related settings to enable children
    with disabilities to be educated with
    non-disabled children to the maximum extent
    appropriate.
  • 707 KAR 1280 1 (61)
  • 34 CFR 300.42

119
Activity
  • Brainstorm several different types of
    supplementary aids and services

120
Examples of Supplementary Aids and Services
  • Manipulatives
  • Calculators
  • Extra time
  • Preferential seating
  • Adapted test format
  • Behavior contracts
  • Shortened assignments
  • Use of computer
  • Text/Screen readers
  • Enlarged text
  • Self-monitoring
  • Augmentative communication
  • Scribe

121
Program Modifications Support for School
Personnel
  • Support to meet the unique needs of the child may
    include
  • Specialized Training
  • Use and maintenance of specialized equipment
  • Use of school time
  • Shared planning time
  • Use of school staff
  • Additional adult supervision (note when
    where)

707 KAR 1320 5 (8) 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(4)
122
Assessment Accommodations and Modifications
  • Related to verified disability (with evaluation
    data to support it)
  • Documented as a part of the IEP
  • Part of regular instructional routine
  • Purpose of accessing general curriculum
    (demonstrating what student knows)
  • 703 KAR 5070
  • 707 KAR 1320 5 (10)
  • 34 CFR 300.320(a)(6)

123
Alternate Assessment
  • If the ARC determines that the child shall take
    an alternate assessment for state or
    district-wide assessment, the ARC includes a
    statement of why
  • The child cannot participate in the regular
    assessment and
  • The particular alternate assessment selected is
    appropriate for the child.

707 KAR 1320 5 (11) 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(6)(ii)
124
Related Services
  • Transportation and such developmental,
    corrective, or supportive services as are
    required to assist a child with a disability to
    benefit from special education.
  • 707 KAR 1280 1 (51)
  • 34 CFR 300.34

125
Related Services...
  • facilitate provision of specially designed
    instruction
  • facilitate participation in the regular education
    program
  • need to be provided in school facilities
  • facilitate access to public school
  • are not needed solely for aesthetic, medical, or
    health reasons

126
Activity
  • In small groups, brainstorm a list of related
    services

127
Examples of Related Services
  • transportation
  • psychological services
  • counseling
  • parent education
  • interpreting
  • orientation and mobility
  • occupational therapy
  • physical therapy
  • recreational therapy
  • speech and language therapy
  • 707 KAR 1280 1 (51)
  • 34 CFR 300.34(a)

128
Anita
129
Write Your Own
  • IEP Services including
  • Specially Designed Instruction
  • Supplementary Aids and Services
  • Program Modifications and Support for School
    Personnel
  • Assessment Accommodations and Modifications
  • Alternate Assessment
  • Related Services

130
Beginning Date, Frequency, Location, Duration
  • Stated for services modifications
  • Anticipated frequency how often
  • Anticipated duration anticipated amount of time
    beginning date
  • Location
  • 707 KAR 1320 5 (12)
  • 34 CFR 300.320 (a)(7)

131
Participation in the General Education Program
132
Physical Education
  • The district shall make available to every child
  • with a disability
  • physical education services, specially designed
    if necessary or
  • the opportunity to participate in the regular
    physical education program available to children
    without disabilities unless
  • the child is enrolled full time in a separate
    facility in which case the agency responsible for
    the education of the child in that facility shall
    ensure the child receives appropriate physical
    education or
  • the child needs specially designed physical
    education as prescribed in the childs IEP
  • 707 KAR 1350 1(9)
  • 34 CFR 300.108

133
Making a Placement Decision
  • Review the services in the IEP
  • Consider placement in general
  • education classes FIRST
  • Remove the student from general education only
    when the nature and severity of the disability
    cannot be accommodated for the students success
    in general education classes, even with the use
    of supplementary aids and services
  • 707 KAR 1350 1 (9)
  • 34 CFR 300.117

134
Continuum of Placement Options
LRE FAPE
  • The continuum shall include the alternative
    placements of
  • Instruction in Regular Classes
  • Special Classes
  • Special Schools
  • Home Instruction
  • Instruction in hospitals and institutions
  • 707 KAR 1350 1(2)(3)
  • 34 CFR 300.115

135
Delivery of Services
136
Collaboration Models
  • Lead and Support
  • Co-teaching
  • Speak and Add
  • Speak and Chart
  • Station Teaching
  • Skill Groups
  • Parallel Teaching
  • Show Teaching/Alternative Teaching

137
IEP in Effect
  • For each child with a disability at the beginning
    of the school year
  • Before specially designed instruction and related
    services are provided
  • Implemented as soon as possible following an ARC
    meeting
  • For all eligible children ages 3 through 5
  • 707 KAR 1320 1(3)(4)(7)
  • 34 CFR 300.323(a)

138
No delay due to payment
  • 707 KAR 1320 1 (5)
  • 34 CFR 300.323(c) (2)

139
Minor Changes to an IEP
  • 707 KAR 1320 2 (2)
  • 34 CFR 300.324 (a) (4) (ii)

140
Student Transfers
707 KAR 1320 6 34 CFR 300.323 (e) (f)
141
IEP AccountabilityGood Faith Effort
  • 707 KAR 1320 9 (1)(3)

142
Assurance after IEP written
  • Accessibility to implementers
  • Implementers informed of specific
    responsibilities related to IEP implementation
  • Specific accommodation, modification and supports
    are provided in accordance with the IEP
  • 707 KAR 1320 1 (6)
  • 34 CFR 300.323 (d)

143
Implementers
  • Qualified personnel are selected based on
  • Services as stated in the IEP
  • Qualifications of the service provider (i.e.,
    licensure, certification
  • 707 KAR 1320 1 (6) (a)
  • 34 CFR 300.323 (d)

144
Implementer Responsibilities
  • Instructional planning
  • Monitor progress on goals objectives
  • Maintain records of progress
  • Report progress

145
Progress Monitoring Decisions That Must Be Made
  • Who will collect the data?
  • Where will data be collected?
  • How often will data be collected?
  • How will data be recorded?
  • Where will progress data be kept?
  • What actions should the teacher take if a student
    is not progressing as expected? 707 KAR
    1320 2 (6) (b)
  • 34 CFR 300.324 (b) (A)

146
Collect Data
3/31/2015
147
Progress Monitoring Data is Collected
  • In an on-going manner
  • At least as often as indicated in local
    procedures
  • According to the frequency of the services
  • With indicators of date and criteria of work
    completed

3/31/2015
148
Setting Baseline
  • Determine a Baseline before the delivery of
    Specially Designed Instruction
  • Administer multiple probes
  • Score the probes
  • Plot the scores

3/31/2015
149
Example Edward
Goal 1 Using a list of high frequency words,
Edward will correctly identify 40 words in one
minute.
150
Setting a Baseline
Day 1 8 wpm Day 2 10 wpm Day 3 6 wpm
The middle number in the sequence.
151
Set Up a Graph
Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb Mar Apr May
Months of School
3/31/2015
152
Goal Line
Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb Mar Apr May
153
Determining the Frequency of Data Collection
Daily, Weekly, or Monthly
  • 1. Find the baseline number (In this case 8)
  • Subtract baseline number from the goal (40-8
    32)
  • Divide the difference between the baseline and
    the goal by the number of days, weeks, or months
  • 32 words / 8 months 4 words per month

154
Implement Specially Designed Instruction
and Collect Student Progress Data
Sep Oct Nov Dec
Jan Feb Mar Apr
May
155
Not making Progress Change Instructional Program
trend-line
X
X
goal-line
3/31/2015
156
Progress is Greater than the Goal Increase the
Goal Target
trend-line
goal-line
3/31/2015
157
Edwards Progress
Sep Oct Nov Dec
Jan Feb Mar Apr
May
158
Annual Review Report the Data
  • Review the IEP
  • Make decisions about the IEP
  • Plan for reevaluation, if necessary
  • Determine the need for ESY

707 KAR 1320 2 (6) (c) 34 CFR 300.324 (b)
3/31/2015
159
Annual Review Decisions
  • Did not make progress as expected still needs
    SDI develop new IEP
  • Made progress as expected and no longer needs SDI
    -Release child from SDI
  • Did not make progress as expected or may no
    longer need but reevaluation information is
    needed develop new IEP

160
Extended School Year
  • Determination of need and level of service
  • An ARC decision
  • Based on individual need
  • Not based on disability category
  • Not one size fits all
  • ESY services are provided
  • Beyond the districts normal school year
  • At no cost to parents
  • In accordance with the IEP

161
ESY Data Collection Process
Teach Data Break
Data Regression Yes No Reteach
Data Recoupment Report to ARC
162
Reflect on the IEP
  • Can you articulate this to staff and parents?
  • Do you know what it means?
  • Do you know how to teach it?
  • Does it clearly explain what you are going to
    work on?
  • Do you know how to evaluate it?
  • Can you teach this tomorrow?

163
Writing the IEP is the beginning not the end!
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